Gluten-Free Road Trip

A version of this article was originally published in our September 2016 Newsletter.


gary_schneider_truckster
It takes us to work, hauls the kids to school, and totes our groceries. It’s subjected to scorching heat, freezing ice, and every kind of weather in between. Without it, life would be a lot more complicated. I present to you the humble automobile.

Once considered a toy for the rich and powerful, mass production methods made cars available to the general population. Since the early 1900s, this piece of machinery changed not only how we travel, but life as we know it.

There’s no denying the call of the open road. The 4 million miles of public roads in the United States offer a freedom that’s hard to match.
arewethereyet

Most of us have childhood memories of that thing we call a “family vacation”. It involves piling everyone and only their “most essential” belongings into the family vehicle for the seemingly never ending cross-country trek to somewhere or some obscure relative.

Traveling is one of the challenges we encounter in the gluten-free lifestyle. Leaving the safety of your home can be unsettling - even for the most experienced. With a little planning and some creativity, we can make it a trip we remember for a lifetime.

Traveling by car/van/Wagon Family Truckster/Vista Cruiser is not the fastest mode of transportation, but it’s readily accessible, the most economical, and certainly the most flexible method.

Arrive two hours before departure. Stand in endless lines. Put up with ill-tempered TSA agents eagerly waiting to do full body searches. Pay for going six ounces over the fifty pound weight limit for luggage. Fahgettaboudit - we’re calling the shots - we’re traveling on our own terms. Heck, we can take 50 pounds of shoes if we want! However, we’ll be using our space more effectively by taking 45 pounds of food and only 5 pounds of shoes. Hey, we gotta be comfortable walking around the world’s largest ball of twine, right?

tripplanningequation

A successful trip starts before you even insert the key into the ignition. Planning is an important part of the equation - it’s even more important on a gluten-free road trip.

I’m going to assume you’ve already had your vehicle checked over and know that it’s road worthy. No one wants a breakdown on the way Neillsville, WI to see Chatty Belle, the world’s largest talking cow.

Are you ready to start your gluten-free road trip? Let’s go!

Create an Itinerary.

It helps to have at least a rough itinerary for your trip. Research the cities you’ll be visiting or passing through. The internet makes this so much easier. If you are near larger cities, it’ll be easier to find grocery stores, farmers markets, and restaurants that will be accommodating. If you’ll be meandering down the less travelled dusty backroads, you need to expect gluten free options will be less likely - so plan accordingly.

Local support groups can be invaluable when it comes to finding trusted sources of food. As you well know, groups and their most humble leaders are amazing resources.

Road Trip Toolbox

Mapping sites

  • Mapping sites allow you to get directions to and from desired locations.
  • Get a bird’s eye view of the area.
  • Great reconnaissance tools.
  • Create maps with your points of interest in order to quickly see how close or far these spots are from one another.

How far is that gluten-free restaurant from our hotel?

Google Maps
MapQuest
Bing Maps
Rand McNally



Trip Planning Websites

NOTE: No personal experience with these sites, but will be investigating them closer.

Roadtrippers
TripHobo
PlanApple



Lodging

Find, Research, and book hotel rooms. I always use TripAdvisor to vet hotels. Guest comments are extremely helpful.

TripAdvisor
Kayak
Travelocity
Plan Your Meals and Snacks.

Think carefully about the number of days and nights on the road and your “eating opportunities”. Keep in mind, “eating and drinking opportunities” in a car are almost constant. Make sure you have plenty of snacks and H2O on hand. Double bonus points for healthy snacks!

We do best if we plan for breakfast and lunch. For dinner, we try to seek out a reputable restaurant - of course - if at all possible, this is mapped out ahead of time.

Many hotels offer free continental breakfasts, but gluten-free options are usually limited to fresh fruit. If you’re lucky, you might find hard boiled eggs. Luckily, you brought your own!

When selecting a hotel, get a room with a microwave and fridge. Having these basic tools on hand makes it a bit more convenient. If you’re staying longer than overnight, find a place with a kitchenette. Of course this means packing some basic cooking equipment.

Stocking Your Mobile Pantry.

You’ll want to raid your kitchen or go to the grocery store to lay in supplies for your epic road adventure. You’ll want to pick foods & snacks that are easy to handle, particularly for the driver.

Since you’ve already scouted out some potential grocery stores at your stopping points, you can gauge how much food you’ll need to bring along for each leg of your Tour de ‘Merica.

Grab your favorite gluten-free crackers, pretzels, breads, snack bars, beef jerky or meat sticks, sandwich meat, packets/cans of tuna, hard boiled eggs.

Make up a cold pasta or tuna salad the night before you leave. This makes for a great lunch the next day. While you’re at it, fry up a pound or two of bacon (crispy please). You’ll be happy you did when you have access to a microwave.

Don’t forget your favorite fruits (whole apples, bananas, oranges, grapes, watermelon, cantaloupe, strawberries) and veggies (carrots, sliced bell pepper, broccoli and cauliflower florets, celery, snap pea pods, cucumber slices, cherry tomatoes).

No road trip is complete without a big batch of trail mix (a variety of nuts, dried fruits, chocolate chips or M&Ms…and any thing else you like - be creative).

Prepping some of the foods ahead of time will pay big dividends when you’re out on the road. Washing, slicing, pealing, and packaging foods will make them easier to eat. Put these foods into sealable air/water tight containers - like Ziplock Containers/bags, or Tupperware brand containers.

Road Trip Toolbox

Toaster Bags

Practice safe-toasting. You’re hankering for a piece of gluten-free toast, but you can’t find a gluten-free toaster anywhere. No problem, toaster bags to the rescue!

Several brands of Toaster Bags
Toaster Bags - Amazon



Individual/Travel Sized Products

Minimus.biz offers over 2,500 food & non-food products. A most interesting website!

Gluten-Free Food

“Only food products that have been labeled by the manufacturer as being Gluten Free are listed here in our Gluten Free Food shopping aisle. Though other products may also qualify as Gluten Free, they are not marked by the manufacturer. “


Minimus.biz Website
Cooler Hand Luke or Have Cooler Will Travel.

A cooler is an essential part of any trip - yes, even day trips!

Improper food storage can result in food-borne illness; in severe cases it can be deadly. Bacteria thrive and multiply quickly in warmer temperatures. The danger zone falls between 40 and 140 degrees. Without refrigeration or a heat source, perishable food should not be left out for more than two hours if the temperature is below 90 degrees. Reduce that time to one hour if the temperature is at or above 90 degrees. Keep cold foods at or below 40 degrees and hot foods at or above 140 degrees. Throw an appliance thermometer in the cooler to keep an eye on the temperature.

Coolers come in many sizes, shapes, and materials (soft sided and hard sided). They range from simple low-tech styrofoam to hi-tech iceless car battery/AC powered travel coolers and refrigerators. The hard sided coolers offer longer cooling than soft sided. Spend some time researching which type of cooler is right for your needs - it’s worth the investment of time.

If you’re going old school with a traditional non-powered cooler, you’ll need to think about the type of ice to use. What?!? Ice is ice, no?

Crushed ice or cubes cools items faster, but blocks of ice last longer. Dry ice is also an option, but requires some special handling - we won’t cover that here.

Cube ice & water mixture is great for cooling beverages, but tends to be messy and doesn’t mix well with food. Soggy food is never good eats.

The best option is block ice - even better when the block is inside a container like a plastic bottle or sealable container. The container helps in reducing the amount of water in your cooler.

The best bottles I’ve found are Simply Lemonade/OJ/Apple Juice/etc 88.93 and 59 oz. Also Pure Leaf Iced Tea 64 oz. What I like about these bottles - they’re not round and have relatively flat sides - this means better contact with food for maximum cooling.

For smaller ice bottles, Pure Leaf Iced Tea 18oz are perfect. All of these bottles are made of thicker plastic and hold up very well. We use them almost weekly for grocery shopping expeditions. Soda bottles work well too.

You can also freeze water in quart sized Ziploc freezer bags or the 3” thick ZipLoc rectangular containers. I’d prefer the containers over the bags. The flat ice blocks can come in handy when layering items in the cooler.

Remember, water expands when it freezes. Do not fill bottles/containers all the way to the top - leave some room for expansion.

Road Trip Toolbox

Cooler Reviews

Looking for your first cooler? Looking to add another one to your collection? Here’s a few sites offering their reviews of different brands/models.

Good Housekeeping
Field & Stream (High End - $$$)
Outdoor Gear Lab
Best Cooler



Air & Water Tight Containers

Wondering what to put your foods in? Check out these containers:

LockNLock
TupperWare Brand



Food Cold Storage Times


How long can I keep foods?

Univ. of MN Extension Food Safety
http://bit.ly/2cKHnyr - http://bit.ly/2ceucqa
Pack Your Cooler Like a Gluten-Free Boss.

Now that you have a cooler, you need to know how to pack it properly. Here are some tips.
Wash it before & after using. These guys usually are stored in the basement, in the garage, under the crawl space, in the attic. They can be hot and dirty. If they’re not clean and dry, the inside can get funky. No one likes Cooler Funk.

Pre-chill the cooler with ice and water mixture for a few hours before packing. This will ensure the cooler is chillin’. Discard the pre-chill ice bath.

Don’t pack room temperature or warm items. These items make the ice melt faster, plus it takes a long time for them to get cold. Make sure everything you pack in the cooler is already cold. For most food, it’ll be coming cold from the fridge or the freezer, but for things like beverages - it’s best to pre-chill them - just like the cooler.
Store foods in air/water tight containers. I mentioned this above, but it bears repeating. You don’t want cooler water seeping into your food. Ewww, just ewww. Tupperware brand containers are supposed to be the cat’s meow for this type of storage. Canning jars with the rubber ringed covers would work too, but they’re glass and have the potential to break if dropped.

Place ice (whatever form you use) on the bottom of cooler. Place the perishable foods - those that need to be kept cold the most (pasta/potato salads, meats, dairy, eggs, etc) closest to or directly on the ice. Build layers of ice/food/ice using those flat rectangular containers or Ziploc bags containing ice. Items on top of the cooler should require the least amount of cold.

Keep the lid closed of your food cooler as much as possible.

Have a separate beverage cooler if you have the room. A smaller one just to keep a couple of bottles of your favorite beverage. It’ll help you stay out of the food cooler.

A full cooler stays colder, longer. If you start to run low on items in the cooler - add nonperishable foods, or even a blanket to take up space.

Keep the cooler out of the sun. Keep the cooler inside the car where there’s air conditioning - not in the trunk.

Road Trip Toolbox

Find Local Gluten-Free Support Groups

Always check your destination for the nearest local support group. They’ll be able to direct you to shopping & dining places.

GIG of ECW Local Support Groups

Find Local Gluten-Free Dining

A few resources to help narrow down your dining selections.

Always ask questions and use your best discretion when dining out. If you’re not comfortable, politely leave.

Website and Smartphone Apps

AllergyEats
Gluten-Free Passport
(Smartphone app not free)
FindMeGlutenFree


Gluten Intolerance Group Links

Traveling Gluten Free
Restaurant Dining - 7 tips for staying gluten-free
Easy to Find & Fix Snacks
GF Certified Food Services
Organize Your Dry Snacks.

Repackage your dry snacks just like your cooler foods. Air tight containers will keep them fresher, longer (assuming they last before you get 50 miles from home).

Keep all snacks in a clear tote bag or container of some type. You’ll always know where they are and you’ll be able to see which container to grab.

In the same container keep some paper towels, wet wipes, or a damp wash cloth in a ziplock bag. You’ll want to wash those paws after snacking.

Salt/pepper/seasonings goes in the same container.


Non-Food Stuff.

You’ll need some basic household/kitchen items to round out your arsenal…

Eating utensils - disposable or non disposable - your choice.

Paper plates/bowls/cups

Couple of kitchen knives - paring and steak knife.

Small flexible cutting board

Roll of paper towels

Trash bags

Dish soap





Simple On the Go foods:

Cottage Cheese with fruit
Yogurt with granola
Hard boiled eggs
Peanut butter
Sliced cheese
Lunch meats
Meat Sticks/Jerky
Canned/Packet Tuna
Summer sausage
Crackers/pretzels/rice cakes
Granola Bars
Trail Mix
Nuts
Grapes
Protein Bars/Snack Bars


Hopefully these hints and tips have inspired you to plan your next great gluten-free adventure.

TravelSnacks


potholes

Grain-Free for the Gluten-Free

A version of this article was originally published in our January 2016 Newsletter.


At this stage of the game, you’ve probably heard about some type of low or no carb diet template. As the name suggests, these diets remove all grains - yes, even the gluten-free grains.


glutenfreeschooljenniferfugo
Hidden Danger of “Grain Free” Food Companies Don’t Want You to Know
by Jennifer Fugo of GlutenFreeSchool.com

Jennifer’s excellent article explores several facets - benefits and the hidden danger - of grain-free foods.

“Grain Free” doesn’t mean gluten-free.”

“Grain free is not (nor may ever be) a safe substitute for gluten free, nor is any sort of paleo certification labeling.“

Full Article: http://bit.ly/1mJMakK


Grain-free diets are known by several different names: Specific Carbohydrate Diet (SCD), Caveman, Ancestral, Paleolithic, Gut and Psychology Syndrome Diet (GAPS), Autoimmune Paleo Diet (AIP), Wheat Belly.

These diets tout a host of benefits that extend beyond a traditional gluten-free diet. Many members of the gluten-free community feel best when they’re grain-free as well.

By definition, grain-free should be gluten-free. “Gluten” is the generic name for the various proteins found in grains. You ditch the grains, you ditch the gluten. It’s a no-brainer! Um, not so fast Slick…

The purpose of this article is to make you aware of an important fact that is not always discussed by the proponents of grain-free diets.

Don't be lulled into a false sense of gluten-free safety by a grain-free food - even though it may be “Paleo Certified”. Sure, the food itself may be naturally gluten-free, but gluten-cross contamination could still be a threat. My concern is for those who may not know to be concerned about cross contact. The unknowing may wonder why they’re not feeling better while being grain-free due to gluten contamination.

GFWDLogo2

Gluten contamination of grains, seeds, and flours in the United States: a pilot study - July 2010

Tricia Thompson, MS, RD, Ann Lee, EdD(c), RD, LD, and Thomas Grace

This study tested twenty-two single ingredient naturally gluten-free grains, seeds and flours.

“Seven of 22 samples (32%) contained mean gluten levels >/=20 ppm”

“Gluten contamination of inherently gluten-free grains, seeds, and flours not labeled gluten-free is a legitimate concern.”

Read more: http://bit.ly/1OQVXSN



Almond flour, coconut flour, chick pea flour, flax seeds (whole or ground), whole nuts of all kinds, herbs, spices, and seasonings are some of the popular ingredients in many grain-free foods. Sure, those are all single ingredient foods - but if these foods are ground, processed, packaged on lines used for gluten containing foods, then the end product could have detrimental levels of gluten.

The bottom-line for those with gluten-related disorders who want to be grain-free - make sure your grain-free foods/ingredients are labeled or certified gluten-free.


Alan Klapperich
GIG of ECW Branch Manager


Gluten-Free Gratitude

A version of this article was originally published in our November 2016 Newsletter.

I cross paths with a number of members in the gluten-free community who are troubled, angry, and hurting [both emotionally and physically]. This leaves me with a heavy heart. Just maybe, the information found here, might help ease the pain - just a little bit.

Printer Friendly Icon
Stay strong. Keep moving forward.

Peace and blessings,

Alan Klapperch
GIG of ECW Branch Manager

A special thank you to Pastor Kimberly Stowell [my spiritual leader] for "planting the seed". This article was inspired by a recent sermon.



The Guest House

"This being human is a guest house.
Every morning a new arrival.

A joy, a depression, a meanness,
some momentary awareness comes
as an unexpected visitor.

Welcome and entertain them all!
Even if they're a crowd of sorrows,
who violently sweep your house
empty of its furniture,
still, treat each guest honorably,
He may be clearing you out
for some new delight.

The dark thought, the shame,
the malice, meet them at the door laughing, and invite them in.

Be grateful for whoever comes,
because each has been sent
as a guide from beyond."

Jalal Al-Din Rumi
Translation by Coleman Barks

Life is full of twists and and turns. We never know what's going to come at us.

Rumi's "The Guest House" poem reminds us to welcome all of our life experiences, even those we consider less desirable.

The emotions we encounter in this life offer us the ability to enter a new state of being - to learn something new about ourselves. Perhaps, they may be preparing us for greater things to come.

No one decides one day to play host to a gluten-related disorder. I know I didn't. This "unexpected visitor" appeared - liked the new digs and decided to hang around. In my heart of hearts, the path that I have traveled is not one I would have chosen. I am eternally thankful for what nutritionist and author, Melissa Diane Smith calls “the gift of gluten-free”. All those years ago when I was lying on the living room floor in the fetal position, I could not have imagined what was in store for me [besides death].

I had to give up gluten, but what I have received in return is beyond measure.

It took a while to realize it, but I was given an opportunity to use my skills and talents to help others. I discovered talents I didn't know I had! The biggest gem unearthed in me was a passion and a purpose - something that was lacking in my life previously.

I consider myself an ordinary, average guy. If this transformation can happen to me, it can happen for you.




It doesn’t take long to realize that going gluten-free changes our life - forever.

This new reality hits us with the force of a speeding freight train. In some cases, it comes out of nowhere. No lights, no whistles, no warning what so ever. WHAM! Our life is shattered into a million pieces.

gratitude-1251137_1280
Everything we have come to know and love - changes - in the blink of an eye. What has taken us a lifetime to create must be re-engineered and rebuilt; not an easy task by any measure. This process comes with a high cost; not only financially but also emotionally and physically. Stress, frustration, fear, and anger make large withdrawals from our emotional bank account - withdrawals we may not be able to cover.

With increased rates of anxiety and depression it’s no wonder those with gluten-related disorders consider ourselves to have a lower quality of life than our peers. As we might expect, grief soon appears. This is normal and healthy; we need to allow ourselves to process those feelings. It’s easy to understand how we could get caught up in a never ending downward spiral of negativity and despair; there are days we feel as if there is no way out.

I’ve painted a rather dark and brooding [albeit realistic] picture of what it's like to live with a gluten-related disorder. For some, it's all of this and more. For others, they adapt and adjust with minimal or no hardship. I believe we’d see similar pictures if we explored other chronic health conditions or tragic life circumstances.

We can’t help but wonder, will we ever feel better about our situation? Is there a way break out of these emotional and physical shackles? YES!

GRATITUDE

Pasted Graphic
Robert Emmons, PhD, is the one of the world’s leading scientific experts on gratitude.

A Professor of psychology at University of California, Davis and director of Emmons Lab, where they focus on the science of gratitude and its effects on health and wellbeing.

“Gratitude heals, energizes, and transforms lives. We are engaged in a long-term research project designed to create and disseminate a large body of novel scientific data on the nature of gratitude, its causes, and its potential consequences for human health and well-being. Scientists are latecomers to the concept of gratitude. Religions and philosophies have long embraced gratitude as an indispensable manifestation of virtue, and an integral component of health, wholeness, and well-being.”

Author of several books including: Thanks!: How Practicing Gratitude Can Make you Happier and Gratitude Works!: A 21-Day Program for Creating Emotional Prosperity



What is gratitude?

Dr. Emmons defines gratitude as:

A felt sense of wonder, thankfulness, and appreciation for life.”

He maintains that gratitude consists of two key components: affirmation of goodness, and knowing where it comes from. He writes:

“First, it’s an affirmation of goodness. We affirm that there are good things in the world, gifts and benefits we’ve received. This doesn’t mean that life is perfect; it doesn’t ignore complaints, burdens, and hassles. But when we look at life as a whole, gratitude encourages us to identify some amount of goodness in our life.

love-1241735_640
The second part of gratitude is figuring out where that goodness comes from. We recognize the sources of this goodness as being outside of ourselves. It didn’t stem from anything we necessarily did ourselves in which we might take pride. We can appreciate positive traits in ourselves, but I think true gratitude involves a humble dependence on others: We acknowledge that other people—or even higher powers, if you’re of a spiritual mindset—gave us many gifts, big and small, to help us achieve the goodness in our lives.”


I think it's safe to say that every gluten-free person has ridden an emotional roller coaster. People suffer for years [6 – 10 years on average]; endure numerous doctor's office visits and usually walk away with more questions than answers. Frustrating to say the least. The result of finally getting answers to the on-going health issues brings an immediate sigh of relief, almost a giddiness. “WHEW, I finally know what's wrong with me!

All too quickly that euphoria dissipates when reality comes calling - “What am I going eat and how am I going to handle this?” Convenience – gone. Care-free dining – adios. The joy of family gatherings - replaced with dread and worry. Things that took little or no thought - now rivals the logistics of a Mars Rover launch.

For many of us, this transition can be a difficult time.

How Gratitude Can Help You Through Hard Times
By Robert Emmons, PH.D.

“It's easy to feel grateful when life is good, says Robert Emmons. But when disaster strikes, gratitude is worth the effort.

A decade’s worth of research on gratitude has shown me that when life is going well, gratitude allows us to celebrate and magnify the goodness. But what about when life goes badly? In the midst of the economic maelstrom that has gripped our country, I have often been asked if people can—or even should—feel grateful under such dire circumstances.”

Read More: http://bit.ly/2feicp2



At first glance, the gluten-free lifestyle means giving up a lot things. However, as we start picking up the pieces of our life and clearing away the debris, we discover that goodness is still there. It has not abandoned us, it is merely manifesting itself in different ways - ways that we’re not used to seeing - it’s in disguise. Somedays, we may need to dig damn hard and deep to find the goodness.

Gratitude allows us to focus on what we have instead of what has been taken away.

TIP: View what we are receiving as gifts. This helps protect us from taking them for granted.

Let’s explore of a few of these gluten-free gifts. Probably the most obvious and precious gift is the opportunity to improve our health. The gift of love from someone who cares for us when we don’t feel well. The gift of compassion from our best friend or loved one who is learning right along side us - cheering us on - being our gluten-free champion. The gift of kindness from a stranger in the gluten-free aisle at the grocery store as they help us avoid a nuclear meltdown because we don’t know which product to get. The gift of friendship as we meet others in the gluten-free community; we realize we are not isolated, nor alone. The gift of comfort when we find a product that is labeled and certified gluten-free. These examples simply scratch the surface.

For over a decade, Dr. Emmons and his associates have scientifically documented the social, physical, and psychological benefits of gratitude.


  • Gratitude increases happiness.
  • Gratitude reduces anxiety and depression.
  • Gratitude blocks negative emotions.
  • Gratitude improves health: strengthens immune system, reduces blood pressure, lessens symptoms of illness, decreases awareness of aches and pains.
  • Gratitude improves sleep. Better sleep is important factor in improving overall health.
  • Gratitude promotes forgivness.
  • Gratitude fosters a “pay it forward” attitude.
  • Gratitude strengthens relationships.

Robert Emmons, PhD Video Series

The Power of Gratitude: http://bit.ly/2ejTxQr

What Good is Gratitude?
http://bit.ly/2feq4a6

The Benefits of Gratitude:
http://bit.ly/2fAOX0e






Gratitude sounds great, but how can we best harvest these transformative powers?

Cultivating an attitude of gratitude takes a bit of work and practice. At first you may feel uncomfortable or awkward doing it. You may be wobbly and unsteady, just like taking your first steps or your first attempt at riding a bike. You might even find it emotionally painful - you know - kind of like those muscles you didn’t know you had until after raking the lawn. Like any skill or activity, the more we do it, the better we get. It is best to start slow and work your way up.

Dr. Emmons suggests these exercises to get started. Please be sure to click the links for a more detailed description of these exercises and the reasons why they work:

  • Count your Blessings: Regularly make mental notes of your blessings - no need to write them down. Do it first thing in the morning or before going to sleep. Ask yourself,“What am I grateful for today?z

  • Three Good Things: For a minimum of one week, write down three things that went well each day. Small or large events - it doesn’t matter. A tangible, written paper trail is important. In detail, explain why things went well. Capture how you felt at the time and how you felt when remembering the event. Share your thoughts about what caused the event. If you happen to focus on negative feelings - shift focus toward the good events and those positive feelings.

  • Gratitude Letter: Write a letter to someone who did something for which you are grateful but you’ve not fully shared your gratitude. It’s best if this person is still alive - someone you can meet face-to-face. When you meet, read them the letter. Take note of their reaction as well as your reaction. Together, discuss your feelings about the letter.

  • Savoring Walk: For a minimum of one week, go for a 20 minute walk. Take a different route each day. During this time, notice as many positive things as you can - sights, sounds, smells, and touches. As you notice something, pause a moment and understand why it’s pleasurable to you.

  • Keep a Gratitude Journal: This is similar to Three Good Things above, but more in depth. Evidence shows journalling one to three times per week elevates happiness better than daily writing. For a minimum of two weeks - at least once a week for 15 minutes, describe up to five things for which you feel grateful.


Why is Gratitude Good?
By Robert Emmons, PH.D.

We’ve studied more than one thousand people, from ages eight to 80, and found that people who practice gratitude consistently report a host of benefits: stronger immune systems, less bothered by aches & pains, lower blood pressure, higher level of positive emotions, more optimism & happiness, more compassionate, more forgiving, less lonely & isolated.”

Read More: http://bit.ly/2eT5lFI



Some people find they do better when surrounded by others - like having a workout partner(s). Participating with another person or a group of people inspires and motivates them to continue.

We know the power behind the act of expressing our own gratitude - participating with a group of people expressing their gratitude has to multiply that power - right?

PK gratitude mission
If you are on Facebook and interested in participating in such a group, I invite you to check out PK Gratitude Mission.

This is a closed group, created by Pastor Kimberly Stowell - my pastor and spiritual leader of St. Stephen's Lutheran Church, Rogersville, Wisconsin (home of the gluten-free communion). Only members of the group can participate and see the posts to the group, so you’ll need to request to join or be invited.

When asked about the purpose of the group, Pastor Kimberly says: “The Gratitude Mission is about helping and up-lifting others.

If large groups frighten you, fear not. Currently this group is small; consisting of less than 80 people. Everyone is kind, courteous, and respectful. I am a member; I find witnessing other people’s gratitude moving and inspirational.

~oOo~


Thank you for your time. I will leave you with one final message of inspiration…

Just keep swimming

“When life gets you down, you know what you gotta do?

Just keep swimming,
Just keep swimming,
Just keep swimming swimming swimming,

What do we do we swim swim swim”


~Dory
Finding Nemo



Dory-image-300x300



Alan Klapperich
GIG of ECW Branch Manager


Gluten-Free Turkeys 2016


The 2016 holidays are upon us, here is a list of turkeys that are labeled as gluten-free. If a turkey isn't on this list, it may be gluten-free, it just means it wasn't checked.

Some turkeys are not gluten-free. Always check the ingredient list! If you are unsure, call the manufacturer and ask questions.

Be aware that the US Dept. of Agriculture (USDA) regulates labeling for meat, poultry, egg products. USDA regulations for labeling allergens [like wheat] are not the same as the FDA regulations. Companies may voluntarily comply with FDA regs, but they are not required to disclose wheat, or barley, rye, or oats or any derivatives.

If you see any of these as ingredients in a USDA product…

Modified Food Starch
Starch
Food Starch
Dextrin

Call the company to verify the source as they could be derived from gluten sources.

About 80-90% of the USDA companies follow FDA allergen labeling regulations.


If you are making a turkey for a gluten-free guest, please read our Guide to Gluten Cross Contamination. They'll love you even more!


Stuffing a gluten-free turkey with gluten stuffing contaminates the turkey - it should not be eaten by those following a gluten-free/gluten-zero diet.



navigatingholidays small
If this is your first gluten-free holiday season, you might check out our Navigating The Holidays article for some hints and tips.

"For many, the holiday season is filled with smiles, laughter and lots of merriment. However, for those with dietary restrictions, it can be the complete opposite – fear, dread and lots of worriment."



pie-966498_640
Looking for some holiday recipes?
Check out
some of our favorites.




festival holiday
Festival Foods offers a very nice Gluten-Free Holiday Guide with recipes and product info.

Thanks to Andi from Manitowoc CDF Group for sharing this link.



Butterball


Gluten-Free Holiday Dinner Guide - complete with a few recipes!

butterball_ismyturkeyGF

INCREDIBLY EASY GLUTEN FREE TURKEY GUIDE

Need to prepare a gluten-free holiday dinner? Butterball can help! Our Butterball fresh and frozen raw unstuffed turkeys are always gluten-free, and our gravy pack included with our Butterball Whole and Boneless Breast items is also gluten-free. And for all the trimmings, check out the recipes below to find a variety of gluten-free side dishes and desserts sure to please all your holiday guests.

For a detailed explanation on our gluten-free products, visit Are Butterball Turkeys Gluten Free on our Frequently Asked Questions Page.

Q: ARE BUTTERBALL TURKEYS GLUTEN FREE?

A: All of the Butterball products are gluten free except for Butterball Stuffed Turkey (bread stuffing) and Butterball Frozen Meatballs. For our products that are packaged with gravy packets, the gravy packets are gluten free as well. The gravy contains rice flour instead of wheat flour and the modified food starch is corn based.



Gluten-Free Butterball Turkeys:

Fresh Whole Turkey - http://www.butterball.com/products/whole-turkeys/fresh-whole-turkey

Fresh L'il Butterball - http://www.butterball.com/products/whole-turkeys/fresh-lil-butterball

Frozen Whole Turkey - http://www.butterball.com/products/whole-turkeys/frozen-whole-turkey

Frozen L'il Butterball - http://www.butterball.com/products/whole-turkeys/frozen-lil-butterball

Frozen Fully Cooked Smoked Turkey: http://www.butterball.com/products/whole-turkey/frozen-fully-cooked-smoked-turkey

Frozen Fully Cooked Baked Turkey: http://www.butterball.com/products/whole-turkey/frozen-fully-cooked-baked-turkey


Butterball lists several gluten free products on their website. Type type "gluten-free" into their "Search for a product" text box and click Search

Butterball Contact:
http://www.butterball.com/contact-us



HoneyBaked


http://www.HoneyBakedOnline.com/category/customer+service/faq.do#10

Do your hams or turkey breast contain glutens?

Our hams and turkey breasts DO NOT contain glutens.





Honeysuckle White


Honeysuckle White Whole Turkeys:
Fresh - http://www.honeysucklewhite.com/products/fresh-whole-turkey/
Frozen - http://www.honeysucklewhite.com/products/frozen-whole-turkey/
Fully Cooked - http://www.honeysucklewhite.com/products/frozen-avna-whole-turkey/

Bone-in Turkey Breasts:
http://www.honeysucklewhite.com/products/frozen-bone-in-turkey-breast-with-gravy/
http://www.honeysucklewhite.com/products/frozen-bone-in-turkey-breast-2/
http://www.honeysucklewhite.com/products/fresh-bone-in-turkey-breast/

Honeysuckle While offers several gluten-free products, however, you have to check each product:
http://www.honeysucklewhite.com/products/


Jennie-O Whole Turkeys


Jenni-O is a Hormel Company. Hormel will clearly gluten (wheat, barley/malt, rye, oats).

Products without Gluten Containing Ingredients

We are providing the following list of products as a general guideline for those presently produced and distributed in the United States with formulas that do not have gluten containing ingredients in the form of wheat, rye, oats, and barley. Although our products are labeled in compliance with government regulations, it is always necessary to read the labels on the products to determine if the food product meets your required needs. Parents and individuals with food allergies and/or food intolerances are responsible for reading the label of all products they intend to use regardless of how the product is represented on this site.

If you have any questions, please call our Customer Service Representatives at 1-800-523-4635.



Hormel's "Product without Gluten Ingredient" List

Tender & Juicy Young Turkey (Gravy packet contains gluten)
https://www.jennieo.com/products/124-Tender-and-Juicy-Young-Turkey

Fresh All Natural Young Turkey
https://www.jennieo.com/products/125-Fresh-All-Natural-Young-Turkey

Premium Fresh Young Turkey
https://www.jennieo.com/products/149-Premium-Fresh-Young-Turkey


Jennie-O has many items on their gluten-free list.


Perdue


http://www.perdue.com/

Gluten-free products from website using their Filters. See Preferences in the left side bar - select Gluten-Free.

  • PERDUE® SHORT CUTS® Carved Chicken Breast, Grilled Fajita Style (9 oz.)
  • PERDUE® SHORT CUTS® Carved Chicken Breast, Rotisserie Seasoned, (9 oz.)
  • PERDUE® SHORT CUTS® Carved Chicken Breast, Grilled (9 oz.)
  • PERDUE® SHORT CUTS® Carved Chicken Breast, Grilled Fajita Style, (26 oz.)
  • PERDUE® SHORT CUTS® Carved Chicken Breast, Grilled Italian Style (9 oz.)
  • PERDUE® SHORT CUTS® Carved Chicken Breast, Grilled, (16 oz.)
  • PERDUE® SHORT CUTS® Carved Chicken Breast, Honey Roasted (9 oz.)
  • PERDUE® SHORT CUTS® Carved Chicken Breast, Original Roasted (26 oz.)
  • PERDUE® SHORT CUTS® Carved Chicken Breast, Original Roasted (9 oz.)
  • PERDUE® SHORT CUTS® Carved Chicken Breast, Southwestern Style (9 oz.)
  • PERDUE® SHORT CUTS® Carved Turkey Breast, Oven Roasted (8 oz.)
  • PERDUE® TENDER & TASTY™ Individually Frozen Boneless, Skinless Chicken Breasts (3 lbs.)

    • PERDUE® SIMPLY SMART® Gluten Free Breaded Chicken Breast Tenders (11.2 oz.)
    • PERDUE® SIMPLY SMART® Gluten Free Breaded Chicken Breast Tenders (18 oz.)
    • PERDUE® SIMPLY SMART® Gluten Free Breaded Chicken Nuggets (20 oz.)
    • PERDUE® SIMPLY SMART® Lemon and Herb Chicken Strips (8 oz.)

    • PERDUE® HARVESTLAND® Chicken Burgers, Florentine, Fully Cooked
    • PERDUE® HARVESTLAND® Organic Chicken & Apple Sausage
    • PERDUE® HARVESTLAND® Organic Italian Style Chicken Sausage
    • PERDUE® HARVESTLAND® Organic Spinach Chicken Sausage

    • PERDUE® HARVESTLAND® Organic Chicken & Apple Sausage
    • PERDUE® HARVESTLAND® Organic Italian Style Chicken Sausage
    • PERDUE® HARVESTLAND® Organic Spinach Chicken Sausage

    Perdue has many GFCO Certified products. You can find them on GFCO's Certified Product List - January 2016 PDF Format

    Should you have further questions, please feel free to contact a consumer representative at 1-800-473-7383 Monday through Friday 9:30 AM to 6:00 PM ET, or email us at www.Perdue.com.


    Plainville Farms


    http://plainvillefarms.com/faq/

    Is your turkey gluten free?

    Yes, our turkey is gluten free and casein free. However, our turkey gravy and our homestyle dressing contain wheat. Our marinated teriyaki turkey tenderloins contain soy. Please read the ingredients labels.



    Shady Brook Farms


    Fresh Whole Turkey (3% basted):
    http://www.shadybrookfarms.com/products/fresh-whole-turkey-3-basted/

    Fresh Whole Turkey (not basted):
    http://www.shadybrookfarms.com/products/fresh-whole-turkey-0-basted/

    Frozen Whole Turkey (basted):
    http://www.shadybrookfarms.com/products/frozen-whole-turkey-2/




    Hams

    Verywell.com Gluten-Free Ham List


    An extensive list of companies

    https://www.verywell.com/gluten-free-ham-562432



    May Contain Statements Updated

    May Contain, Manufactured in a facility, etc
    Voluntary Food Allergen Advisory Statements

    Updated Oct. 20th 2016

    A version of this article was originally published in our May 2016 Newsletter. I see a lot of confusion over these statements. Hopefully this will help clarify what these statements actually mean.

    I've added the Allergen Advisory Statements Study that was published in Sept. 2016.

    Alan Klapperch
    Branch Manager



    You may find a product labeled “Gluten-Free and Wheat-Free” that bears a GFCO gluten-free certification logo, but, it also has a “May contain traces of” statement that includes wheat. WHOA!

    Believe it or not, this product is in compliance with current FDA
    Food Allergen Labeling and consumer Protection Act of 2004 (FALCPA) labeling laws.

    Pasted Graphic 1

    “Contains” statements address the top eight food allergens found in the product as ingredients. (Mandatory)

    “May Contain” statements address potential, inadvertent cross contamination due to processing/packaging. (Voluntary)

    Gluten-Free labeling supersedes voluntary advisory statements.
    May Contain”, “Processed in the same facility as”, or “Processed on the same equipment as” are known as Food Allergen Advisory statements. They are voluntary and are not regulated, unlike the required “Contains” statement for food allergen ingredients. According to the FDA, companies may use advisory statements as long as they are “truthful and not misleading”.

    For years, the gluten-free community has been warned about using advisory statements for determining the gluten-free status. Their usefulness is diminished due to the lack of definition and regulation.

    We covered this information in our March 19th 2011 newsletter and meeting, but it bears repeating. In 2010, HealthNow hosted their 2nd Annual Gluten Sensitivity & Celiac Forum. Cynthia Kupper, RD, GIG Executive Director was a featured speaker. She was asked this question during her Q&A session:

    Q: The ingredient list contains no gluten, but there's a statement about “Processed in the same facility as...”or “Processed on the same equipment as...” what do you do?

    A: That’s a voluntary advisory statement designed for people with IgE allergies. Many companies use it as a “CYA”. No meaning for celiacs. A group of RD's determined that it would reckless of them to suggest that statement should be used to determine gluten-free status. If you have an IgE (anaphylactic reaction), you need to think about it.

    A "Contains..." statement is an allergen statement and required by law. "May Contain" is not an allergen statement.”

    Source: 2010 HealthNow Gluten Sensitivity & Celiac Forum DVD



    Check out this example of Aldi's Baker's Corner Instant Pudding. After the ingredient list, you'll see a statement that reads: "
    MANUFACTURED IN A FACILITY THAT USES TREE NUTS, SOY, MILK, AND WHEAT."

    Baker's Corner Instant pudding

    I reached out to Aldi's to ask about this product. On May 15th, 2015, the Quality Control Supervisor from Subco Foods in Sheboygan, WI (the company that does the pudding) called me. I asked about the production lines for this product - did they run any gluten products on this line?

    Tamela’s answer was very thorough! The pudding lines are dedicated - only pudding is done on them - nothing else - no gluten. They test raw materials for gluten coming into the plant - they test during production and they also send samples out to a private lab for finished product testing. Between pudding flavor runs (vanilla/chocolate/etc), they follow a strict teardown and cleaning process. They are very serious about food allergens.

    Also the pudding lines are isolated from their jello lines. She said they do not want dairy getting into the jello lines.


    So, what do we do with products like this? Call the manufacturer to ask questions. Ask about the facilities, the production lines, and their policies and procedures for allergen handling. If they do not answer the questions to your satisfaction, find another manufacturer with a similar product that does meet your needs.


    Additional information on Advisory Statements



    Allergen Advisory Statements Study


    Tricia Thompson, Trisha B. Lyons, and Amy Jones analyzed allergen advisory statements of 101 products previously tested for gluten content by
    Gluten-Free Watchdog. These products were not labeled gluten-free, however the ingredient list did not include any gluten containing ingredients (no wheat, barley, rye, malt, or brewers yeast).

    On September 14th 2016, they published Allergen Advisory Statements for Wheat: NOT a Useful Predictor of Gluten Content.

    Here's what they found…

    In this database review, precautionary labeling for wheat or gluten on products not labeled gluten-free but appearing to be free of gluten-containing ingredients was NOT a useful predictor of gluten content. In some cases, consumer reliance on precautionary statements for wheat or gluten could have resulted in choosing a product contaminated with gluten.

    • 87/101 (86%) products tested for gluten did NOT include an allergen advisory statement for wheat or gluten on product packaging.

    • Fourteen products (14%) tested for gluten DID include an allergen advisory statement for wheat or gluten on product packaging.

    • Of the 87 products that did NOT include an advisory statement, 13 (15%) contained quantifiable gluten at or above 5 ppm including 4 products (5%) that tested at or above 20 ppm of gluten.

    • Of the 14 products that DID include an advisory statement, only 1 (7%) contained quantifiable gluten at or above 5 ppm.

    SUMMARY
    On the basis of this analysis, the current use of allergen advisory statements for wheat or gluten are not useful predictors of whether or not a single or multi-ingredient food product contains 20 or more p.p.m. of gluten. Precautionary statements should be regulated and standardized so that they are helpful to the consumer.


    Some other useful information found in this study…

    In terms of foods labeled gluten-free, consumers are advised to trust the label regardless of allergen advisory statements for wheat or gluten. This is due to the gluten-free labeling rule applying to both gluten in ingredients and gluten that may be found in a product due to cross contact. However, when it comes to foods not labeled gluten-free but appearing to be "gluten-free" based on ingredients, there are no established guidelines for individuals with celiac disease on whether they should avoid products with allergen advisory statements for wheat or gluten.

    Increased education is also required to let consumers know that FALCPA includes ingredients only and does not include allergens that may be in a product unintentionally due to cross contact. Increased education is also needed to let consumers know that a gluten-free label applies to gluten that may be in a product due to ingredients and cross contact and that regardless of the source of gluten the product must contain less than 20 p.p.m. gluten.


    A handy one page summary of the study. Click image for full PDF

    FNCEAAS2016 small


    Gluten-Free Watchdog Videos


    GFWLogo
    To learn more about this confusing matter, please watch these excellent Q&A videos from Gluten-Free Watchdog.
    Can Foods Labeled Gluten-Free
    Include a Contains Statement for Wheat?

    http://bit.ly/1XksHWB

    Can Foods Labeled Gluten-Free
    Include a May Contain Statement for Wheat?

    http://bit.ly/1TzClPJ

    May Contain Statements for Wheat:
    Part Two aka Aldi’s Cheesecake

    http://bit.ly/1T52ohT




    Allergic Living "'May Contains’ on Food Labels: What You Need to Know"


    allergicliving
    “‘May Contains’ on Food Labels: What You Need to Know"
    By: Claire Gagné

    http://bit.ly/27fg1ok


    “Advisory labels or “may contains” (also called precautionary warnings) alert customers that traces of an allergenic food might unintentionally have wound up in a packaged food.

    This inadvertent cross-contact can occur because of shared processing lines or baking equipment, or because workers use the same gloves while producing a number of products.

    – The wording of the warning label does not give an indication as to the risk of the allergen being present.

    – Because advisory labels are voluntary, there is no guarantee products without these warnings will not contain traces of allergens. If you are ever unsure about a packaged food, Allergic Living suggests calling the manufacturer to find out about its food allergy management practices. If company representatives can’t adequately answer your questions, avoid the food.”

    Read More…




    Snack Safely - "Understand the Limitations of the Label"


    SnackSafelyUnderstand-Limitations

    Gluten-Free Champion


    Champion-01

    Your spouse, family member, or friend has suffered from recurring health issues for years. You’ve seen them at their best, and at rock bottom. Regardless of how long they’ve been suffering, you don’t like to see it.

    Finally, someone figures it out; your loved one has just told you they must be gluten-free. You’re not really sure what gluten-free is or what it means, but you politely listen to their brief explanation and nod your head sympathetically.

    “Wow,” you think. “That sounds horrible. Sure glad I don’t have to go through that.”

    Sorry to break the news, but pack your bags – you’re going on the journey with them. Why? Because you are a caring, compassionate human being and you want them to be healthy and happy. Good for you!

    If you’re a spouse, you made that commitment when you said, “I do.” If you’re a friend, you signed up when you accepted their most precious gift of trust. If you’re a family member, your name has been on the trip’s manifest since birth. They deserve your respect and help because that’s just what family members do for one another.

    “…but, I know nothing about this, how can I be so important?”

    The important take-away here – you have the power to help them. Your support in this effort is crucial; it could mean the difference between their success and failure.

    Support doesn’t require money, or even specialized knowledge. It can be as simple as just being there for them in whatever way they need you - a smile, a hug, a sympathetic ear, or a strong shoulder. It can also be much, much more.

    GFMan
    Today, there are a lot of resources available to those who are gluten-free. However, very few are designed to help you – the person who loves and cares for their gluten-free loved ones – the gluten-free champion.

    You may not know it, but hiding beneath your street clothes is a superhero’s suit just waiting to be called into action.

    We have a few tips and wealth of information in The Gluten-Free Champion’s Academy (see below) to help you make the leap.

    Peggy’s Story

    What do you do when someone you love gets sick? What do you do when nothing helps them to feel better? What do you do when your best friend, your soul mate and your life partner has changed so drastically that you barely recognize him...

    That was the position I found myself in about 14 years ago. It all started gradually, an upset stomach here, some foot pain there, a little more burping and belching than usual. Nothing big, until it got big. When my normally cheerful, energetic, quick to laugh husband was replaced by a pale, thin, ill man I hardly recognized. A person who sat listlessly staring into space not wanting to see friends or attend family functions for no other reason than "I just don't feel good”.

    As the complaints increased there was much "encouragement" to see the doctor and get these thing "checked out". The assumption was that a test or two would pinpoint the problem and a medication would be prescribed and everything would be fine.

    That’s not what happened. A test or two turned into multiple tests and multiple doctors which did not find the root of the problem. Medications were prescribed that only helped a little or not at all. No real answers were to be found. In the meantime Al continued to get sicker, I felt even more helpless.

    I worked in healthcare for God's sake, someone, somewhere must have some idea, something that would make him well again. With increasing frustration and fear, I often found myself crying in the shower so he wouldn't know how afraid I was. I wondered if he were dying as I was just standing by helplessly, watching.

    Fast forward to March 2003 where we find ourselves on a white sandy beach surrounded by the beautiful turquoise blue water of Jamaica. When my unwell husband requested a vacation to somewhere warm, I, his loving and dutiful wife made it happen! That March was my turning point.

    Al had been doing a lot of research and discovery about this thing called gluten and it's effects on some people. While the discoveries he was sharing with me were very counter intuitive; [read what do you mean crackers and toast can give you a belly ache?] they oddly sounded like him and his symptoms. His gastro doctor was willing to take intestinal biopsies for celiac disease, however the samples did not show intestinal damage. Finding non-celiac gluten sensitivity presented with similar symptoms without intestinal damage, Al started experimenting with a “gluten-free” diet but, the first real evidence I saw happened in Jamaica.

    Before the week ended I had my husband back! The energetic guy who was actually looking for a pickup volleyball game! Some may say it was the magic of Jamaica and I won't disagree, but a large part of that magic was the naturally gluten-free diet that he ate.

    That week "sealed the deal" for me. Any time that Al would question himself about whether being gluten-free was really the root of the problem or not, my mind went back to that week and the health it brought.

    “Do not look back. You are not going that way."
    When Al started down the gluten-free path, I knew I would walk it with him. There was no question. If this is what needed to happen for him to be well, this is what we would do. I would help him in any way I could, we were a team. We both come from families where whining, fussing or complaining didn't get you very far; you took what was given to you and made the best of it. That's how we took on this challenge. I am not saying it was easy and we did everything perfectly....it wasn't and we didn't.

    There were plenty of times the groceries I brought home went to the local food pantry because l had made the wrong choices; gluten-free labeling laws didn’t exist then. Full loaves of bread and bowls of pasta were chucked into the garbage because they were so bad Al couldn't eat them. The first batch of beautiful gluten-free cookies came out of the oven only to disintegrate into dust when I tried to take them off the pan! We learned from those experiences and tried to make things better the next time. We didn’t give up. I think the key word is we, I think that Al has been just as much of a support to me as I have been to him. He has always encouraged my efforts and has been appreciative of them.

    As the gluten-free lifestyle became our new normal, it became more important to me that it be “normal”. When I was asked by family and friends about the diet, I always responded there are more things he can have than things he can't.

    It also became my goal to show people that gluten-free was not synonymous with taste-free. I have always enjoyed cooking and baking for people. Nothing gives me more pleasure than to have someone eat and enjoy what I have made and then ask me to make it again. Slowly, I continued transforming all Al's favorite gluten-full treats to gluten-free treats. It became my passion to learn new ways of baking so others wouldn’t feel left-out. And then to be able to pass on what I had learned to others just added to my joy. It has become my way of supporting and helping others on their gluten-free journey. In my humble opinion no one, gluten-free or not should ever go without a good cookie or piece of cake!

    Al and I have also been blessed with supportive family and friends. Their willingness to make sure Al can eat safely in their homes has been a Godsend to us. Their efforts have not gone unnoticed or unappreciated and have made my job as main support so much easier.

    I never considered myself a "champion", but according to the definition, I am and will continue to stay the course.

    When patterns are broken, new worlds emerge.”

    - Tuli Kupferberg
    Embrace Change

    You’ve probably discovered this will be a life changing event. It is not simply a change in diet - it’s a change in lifestyle. The cold, hard truth - it affects every aspect of day-to-day living. Not only for your gluten-free loved one, but for you too. Because of your relationship you will experience these changes with them, albeit in a different way.

    Knowing how to deal with change is important. Change is never easy. In fact, it’s one of the most difficult aspects of this. It will take time and effort, but the gluten-free lifestyle will become the new normal both inside and outside your home.

    As with anything new, there will be challenges to navigate and some things will need to change to keep your loved one safe.

    Embrace these changes and you will see all the good things that will come with your new normal.

    Know what you are dealing with.

    Knowledge is your friend. Once it has been determined that gluten is the culprit making your loved one ill, learn about it.

    You don't need to know the exact science, but have a basic understanding of what happens to the body when gluten is ingested, how can it make that body feel, where gluten is found and what should be avoided.

    You will need to adjust how much you know around your loved one’s knowledge. If your situation requires you to be the “guardian of the knowledge” (e.g. for your child) you’ll slowly want to pass that knowledge on to them. Teach them how to look for gluten and know its hiding places, teach them how to cook.

    Communicate

    As in most things, communication is key. An essential element of communication is listening. Your loved one is going through so many changes, both physical and emotional. If they are newly diagnosed there is a
    grieving process to navigate. Sometimes they may need someone to listen to their frustrations and fears...not offer opinions and solutions, but just to listen.

    confrontation
    Relationships can become strained when chronic health issues arise. Illness can breed feelings of fear and loss, guilt and resentment. These feelings make it easy to build emotional walls. When the walls go up, the communication shuts down. It can be painful, but having conversations about what’s going on is vital.

    When emotions boil over, things can be said in the “heat of the moment”. Conversations can quickly turn into confrontations, further damaging the relationship. It’s important to know the difference between the two.

    “Confrontations are usually fueled by anger.
    Conversations are fueled by curiosity.

    Confrontations have an aura of a judicial proceeding.
    Conversations frame a problem as something to be solved.

    Confrontations have an element of moral superiority.
    Conversations happen between equals.

    Confrontations shield the confronter from any responsibility.
    Conversations say “we’re in this together."

    Conversations will preserve the relationships while the people involved work toward understanding and solutions.”

    ~Marie Hartwell-Walker, Ed.D.
    Source:
    http://bit.ly/1GQw2q1


    Beside working through the physical and emotional elements, there will be many practical, day-to-day things that need to be discussed. Meal and menu changes, how to handle kitchen clean up and what precautions need to be taken to avoid cross contamination or make the house totally gluten-free, how to replace those family favorite foods with a good gluten-free alternatives.

    You may need to communicate with family and friends about the new diet and the importance of your loved one's need to not deviate from it. Yes, a little bit of gluten does hurt!

    Being open to and answering their questions and planning strategies on how to manage family functions and parties will be a large part of the communication process.

    Warning: Family members can be difficult and unsupportive.

    You may also need to convey gluten-free requirements to people outside your immediate circle - servers in restaurants, the pharmacist at the drug store, and the pastor at church, and yes - even medical professionals.

    Be clear, concise and confident in your communications.

    ~0~

    Sometimes your gluten-free loved one isn’t taken seriously, so it helps to have another person [like yourself] be an ambassador - an advocate [fancy words for a “kick-ass champion”]. Someone who will travel not ahead, nor behind, but beside them on the path to gluten-freedom.

    It may be trying at times, but please understand they are not being difficult on purpose. Everyone wants to be happy and healthy, for some it requires a bit more effort.

    commissioner gordon qt-02
    Please be patient, be kind, be positive, and most of all be there for them - “hold space” for them. Your love and support will be appreciated beyond words - beyond measure.

    There may be days when you feel like you are not making an impact, but know you are an important team member. Not every hit is a home run, and sometimes a superhero simply helps someone cross the street. No act of kindness is too small.

    Kudos to you for stepping up and becoming a Gluten-Free Champion!

    Peggy & Alan Klapperich
    Gluten Intolerance Group of East Central Wisconsin

    P.S. Your cape should arrive within four to six weeks.



    Success

    “To laugh often and love much; to win the respect of intelligent persons and the affection of children; to earn the approbation of honest citizens and endure the betrayal of false friends; to appreciate beauty; to find the best in others; to give of one’s self; to leave the world a bit better, whether by a healthy child, a garden patch or a redeemed social condition; to have played and laughed with enthusiasm and sung with exultation; to know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived—this is to have succeeded.”

    ~Bessie Anderson Stanley





    Partners of patients with celiac disease
    report relationship burden

    Healio Gastroenterology article by Will Offit


    “As much as 37% of partners of patients with celiac disease reported relationship burden, according to a study presented at Digestive Disease Week 2016.

    Given the multifaceted manner in which celiac disease can affect patients, it's not unreasonable to expect that the impact of celiac disease may extend to their relationship partners,” Abhik Roy, MD, gastroenterologist at New York-Presbyterian University Hospital of Columbia and Cornell, said during a presentation. “Our study shows that partner burden is quite common in celiac disease with more than one-third of partners experiencing at least mild to moderate burden.”

    Our study shows that partner burden is quite common in celiac disease with more than one-third of partners experiencing at least mild to moderate burden.

    The degree of burden found in this study was similar to that reported for IBS and cancer, the researchers wrote. In addition, the researchers recommended that health care providers address these relationship factors in their care of patients with celiac disease.

    As patients and partners progress in their relationships, the burden of celiac disease seems to shift from the short term focus on diagnosis and dietary modifications to the prognostic implications and uncertainties of a chronic illness,” Roy said. “This illustrates the emotional burden of celiac disease and stresses the importance of including the partner in clinical education and counseling."

    Read more….





    GF Champion Academy5-01


    What is gluten?

    Gluten is the generic term for the proteins found in grains. The proteins found in wheat (durum, graham, kamut, semolina, spelt, emmer, einkorn), barley, rye and commercial oats (think Quaker Oats) are not acceptable for those that gluten-free. Certified gluten-free oats are acceptable for some.


    Where is gluten found?

    Just about everywhere! Bread, pizza, cake, cookies, crackers, pasta, cereal, soups, sauces, beer, candy - just to name a few foods. Many processed foods contain gluten in some form or another. It's very prevalent in the Standard American Diet.

    It’s even found in personal care, hair and beauty products.


    How Much Gluten?

    Think of gluten as a poison. How much arsenic would you like in your food?

    Not only must the food be gluten-free, it must not come in contact with any gluten.

    Yes, even a small crumb can cause problems!

    Studies have shown that some celiacs could consume up to 10 milligrams of gluten per day. (10mg = 1/8th of a teaspoon of flour).

    How much is 10mg? An average grain of rice weighs 28 mg. 1/3 of a grain is just under 10 mg.


    BUT - For many, even 10 mg is too much.

    No gluten is the goal.



    What is Celiac Disease?

    A multi-system auto-immune condition where the consumption of gluten [protein found in wheat, barley, rye] causes the body to attack [and damage] the small intestine.

    Untreated, this condition can lead to: malnutrition since nutrients are not being absorbed properly, additional autoimmune diseases, increased risk of certain cancers.

    Learn more: http://bit.ly/1Nhdden


    What is Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity (NCGS)?

    A condition that is still evolving in the eyes of mainstream medicine.
    NCGS can present with many of the same symptoms of CD, however it does not present with same autoimmune intestinal damage. The lack of intestinal damage does not make this condition any less severe than celiac disease. Damage can occur in other body parts.

    Learn more: http://bit.ly/1oMsOfA


    How do we deal with the changes?

    The Stages of Change
    by Kendra Cherry
    http://abt.cm/1ZxH2wA

    "Understanding the elements of change, the stages of change, and ways to work through each stage can help you achieve your goals"


    5 Steps to Changing Any Behavior
    by Alex Lickerman, MD
    http://bit.ly/1PCurD7

    "Always remember: none of us was born with any habits at all. They were all learned, and can all, therefore, be unlearned. The question is: how badly do you really want to change?"


    How to Withstand Food Peer Pressure
    by Karen Diaz, RD

    http://huff.to/1OMFmKx

    This article does not directly address gluten-free, but it does offer some valuable tips to help combat the pressures that exists.

    “When you are trying to listen to your body, food peer pressure can be the last straw making you throw in the towel. Here are four important ways to withstand food peer pressure.”


    How can I be a better listener?

    The Art of Listening: How Open Are Your Ears?
    by Susan Heitler, Ph. D.
    http://bit.ly/1V1Hkhb

    “Listening, which is one half of the art of conversation, is an act of connection.  Even if you can't touch or see someone, you feel connected if you hear their voice.

    Listening enhances the health of your marriage and other close relationships.

    Listening to yourself enables you to live with more well-being, especially if you combine listening to yourself with listening to others.

    Listening to your body keeps you physically healthy.

    And between a couple, listening is an act of love.”


    Effective Listening Habits:
    • Hungry Listening
    • Hunting
    • Gathering
    • Clarifying
    • Porous Listening

    Problematic Listening Habits:
    • Non-responsive Listening
    • Listening Like a Goalie
    • Rebounding Listening

    To learn more details on these habits, and take a self-assessment listening quiz: http://bit.ly/1V1Hkhb


    What is "holding space" and how do I do it?

    What it Really Means to Hold Space for Someone
    How to be there for the people who need you most
    by Heather Plett
    http://bit.ly/1WDtm6f

    “What does it mean to “hold space” for someone else?

    It means that we are willing to walk alongside another person in whatever journey they’re on without judging them, making them feel inadequate, trying to fix them, or trying to impact the outcome. When we hold space for other people, we open our hearts, offer unconditional support, and let go of judgement and control.

    8 Tips to Help You Hold Space for Others

    1. Give people permission to trust their own intuition and wisdom.
    2. Give people only as much information as they can handle.
    3. Don’t take their power away.
    4. Keep your own ego out of it.
    5. Make them feel safe enough to fail.
    6. Give guidance and help with humility and thoughtfulness.
    7. Create a container for complex emotions, fear, trauma, etc.
    8. Allow them to make different decisions and to have different experiences than you would."


    Where can I find more gluten-free information?

    GFDBC no shadow

    GIG of ECW's Gluten-Free Diet Boot Camp is a large collection of information on celiac, non-celiac gluten sensitivity, gluten-free diet basics, recipes, dining, and a whole lot more!

    Learn more: http://bit.ly/GIGECW_GFBootCamp





    updated 6/11/16 - Added "Partners of patients with celiac disease report relationship burden" article

    Importance of Face-to-Face Support Groups

    personal-885544_640

    According to a Columbia University study, celiac patients reported better quality of life when they participated in face-to-face support groups compared to online support groups. Also, longer duration of face-to-face support generated a greater quality of life.

    In contrast, they found lower quality of life reports when patients spent more time in online support groups.

    Source: http://bit.ly/23gBFDX

    The gluten-zero lifestyle isn’t a walk in the park. It requires hard work, dedication, commitment, and knowledge. The emotional and physical stress of a difficult lifestyle change piled on top of years [often decades] of ill-health, takes it’s toll. Every opportunity for a positive outcome needs to utilized.

    meeting-1015313_1280

    Network equipment giant Cisco
    performed a study of human behavior and the barriers to effective collaboration. Overwhelmingly, the study showed people were more engaged when they could see and hear each other well; interacting the way humans have been doing since the dawn of their existence: face-to-face.

    Humans require direct, face-to-face interaction with one another in order to be happy and healthy.

    Online groups can be a great source of support, however, it’s hard to replace friendly smiles, nodding head(s) of agreement, the sympathetic touch of a hand, or a spirit lifting hug.

    If you do not belong to a local support group, please seek out the nearest group.

    Looking for a group? You can search for group national affiliated [Celiac Disease Foundation (CDF), Celiac Support Assoc. (CSA), Gluten Intolerance Group (GIG)] groups
    here:


    Alan Klapperich
    GIG of ECW Branch Manager

    What oats...

    Through Yonder Package Breaks?

    This article was originally published in our November 2015 newsletter. Due to the importance of pure oats, I decided to beef it up a bit and post it here. Thanks!

    Alan Klapperch
    Branch Manager

    updated 04/20/17 - Add Healio article "Oats appear safe for patients with celiac disease" .
    updated 04/11/17 - Add GIG's Purity Protocol definition.
    updated 03/02/17 - Added Trader Joes GF Rolled Oats to Purity Protocol Heros
    updated 01/25/17 - Added Gluten-Free Watchdog's Updated Position Statement on Oats
    updated 01/05/17 - Add more Gluten-Free Watchdog links
    updated 10/28/16 - Added video and Dietitians in Gluten Intolerance Diseases (DIGID) Oats handout
    updated 06/08/16 - Added Bakery on Main to Purity Protocol Rebels
    updated 05/18/16 - Added GFW oat product analysis.


    oats-701299_640
    Oats and products made with oats have been burning up the internet lately. People in the gluten-free community started asking manufacturers exactly what kind of oats are used in their products…with surprising results.

    More on that later, but first a little background information on said ingredient of discussion.

    Oats have been controversial for over 20 years. Are they acceptable on a GF diet or not?


    The Scoop on Oats

    Please use these excellent articles to help you and your medical professionals to make an educated decision if oats are right for you.

    Oats appear safe for patients with celiac disease by Adam Leitenberger Healio.com April 20,2017
    Pinto-Sánchez MI, et al. Gastroenterol. 2017;doi:10.1053/j.gastro.2017.04.009.

    "Adding oats to increase the nutritional value of a gluten-free diet does not appear to affect symptoms, histology, immunity or serologic features of patients with celiac disease, according to new research published in Gastroenterology."

    "These results are “reassuring, and suggest that non-contaminated oats are tolerated by the great majority of patients,” Peter H. R. Green, MD, professor of medicine at Columbia University Medical Center, and director of the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University, and colleagues wrote. However, they noted that their “confidence is limited by the low quality and limited geographic distribution of the data.”"

    To better address the controversies surrounding the safety of adding oats to a gluten-free diet, Green and colleagues reviewed studies evaluating the safety of oats as part of a gluten-free diet in patients diagnosed with celiac disease or the related skin condition dermatitis herpetiformis. They ultimately included 28 studies published up to January 2017 in their analysis, six of which were randomized controlled trials that used pure uncontaminated oats, and two of which were non-randomized controlled trials (RCTs, n = 661), while the rest were observational studies. Only RCT data were included in a meta-analysis.

    One year of eating oats showed no significant effects on symptoms, histologic findings, intraepithelial lymphocyte counts, or serologic test results. These findings were comparable in both adults and children.

    Further, the results of three non-RCTs suggested that dermatitis herpetiformis lesions did not worsen after consumption of oats. No studies compared regular vs. pure oats.

    The investigators noted that all available RCTs were conducted in Europe, and because the purity of oats depends on the country of origin and its regulations, there is an “urgent need for studies in North America and other regions of the world where [celiac disease] is prevalent. Results from studies in Europe using locally sourced oats cannot be extrapolated to North America.”

    They concluded that available data suggest celiac patients can safely consume non-contaminated oats, but more rigorous data are needed

    Read more: Healio.com April 20,2017



    verywell.com - Oats and the Gluten-Free Diet by Nancy Lapid:
    http://abt.cm/1HZsDSD

    Nancy Lapid’s article contains summaries of all the North American celiac/gluten free organizations and treatment centers recommendations on oat consumption.


    verywell.com - Can People Who Can't Have Gluten Eat Oats? by Jane Anderson:
    http://abt.cm/1F2Qwuk

    Gluten-Free Watchdog - Updated Position Statement on Oats (1/25/17):
    http://bit.ly/2lcn52D

    Gluten-Free Watchdog - Special Report: The Use of Oats in Gluten-Free Foods:
    http://bit.ly/1qK6wwi

    Gluten-Free Watchdog - Controversy continues to swirl around oats & their suitability for a gluten-free diet:
    http://bit.ly/2ieJN88

    Gluten-Free Watchdog - The gluten-free oats situation & why it is such a sticky wicket:
    http://bit.ly/GFWD-Oats-A-Sticky-Wicket


    almond-milk-1074596_960_720
    Currently, most medical professionals say pure, gluten-free oats can be tolerated in limited amounts [up to a 1/2 cup per day for adults].

    Many in the gluten-free community would beg to differ with that recommendation because they react to gluten-free oats as well. Those in the grain-free/low-carb community offer convincing evidence that supports their lifestyle too.

    Regular followup testing is also advised to make sure intestinal damage is not occurring. For those newly diagnosed, it’s suggested to restrict the use of oats for up to one year.

    Also be aware that some celiacs react to the protein found in oats [known as avenin] just as they react to the proteins in wheat, barley, rye.

    If you know they cause you discomfort, do not eat them.

    The experts who recommend oats, all agree that only pure, uncontaminated gluten-free oats be used - no commercial oats allowed.

    Why? Cross contamination with gluten [wheat, barley, rye].

    Often times oats are grown in rotation with wheat, barley, and rye. Stray plants can be left behind that get harvested with the oats. Harvesting, transporting, and processing of oats can use the same equipment as gluten-containing grains, thus exposing oats to further contamination.

    A 2004 study published in The New England Journal of Medicine reveals "regular" oats should not be considered safe for those requiring a gluten-free diet. Four different lots from three different companies found gluten content ranging from less than 3 parts per million to 1807 parts per million. Gluten Contamination of Commercial Oat Products in the United States by Tricia Thompson, MS, RD

    Update January 5th, 2017 - Tricia, founder of Gluten-Free Watchdog, shares another article from PepsiCo (owners of Quaker Oats brand) about testing oats.

    PepsiCo scientists recently published a second article in the scientific peer-reviewed literature on the difficulties associated with testing oats for gluten contamination. This article entitled “Kernel-based gluten contamination of gluten-free oatmeal complicates gluten assessment as it causes binary-like test outcomes” compliments their first article entitled, “Gluten-containing grains skew gluten assessment in oats due to sample grind non-homogeneity.”

    Bottom Line. Based on the findings of the research by scientists from PepsiCo, Gluten Free Watchdog calls on ALL suppliers and manufacturers of gluten-free oats whether purity protocol or mechanically/optically sorted, and their certifying bodies to reevaluate their testing methodology and requirements for certification, respectively.

    Recommendation. The situation with oats continues to evolve. As mentioned above, Gluten Free Watchdog’s position statement on oats will be updated in the near future. In the meantime, my advice is:

    Choose your oat products based on your comfort level with regard to the level of information provided to you by manufacturers. You may want to consider the following:

    Does the manufacturer disclose whether they use purity protocol or sorted oats?

    Do they disclose their testing protocols?

    Do they disclose the assay they use to test oats for gluten contamination?

    If a manufacturer refuses to answer any of these questions or responds by saying the information is proprietary, the advice of Gluten Free Watchdog is to move on to another company.


    Read More: http://bit.ly/2iePfrv
    Quaker's first article on oat testing:
    http://bit.ly/2hX1JpU




    Update May 18th, 2016 - Mining through five years of testing, Gluten-Free Watchdog finds oat products are at higher risk of gluten contamination compared to gluten-free labeled foods as a whole. 35 products containing oats as first or second ingredient were tested. Analysis shows:

    • 28 of 35 (80%) of oat products tested below 5 parts per million of gluten.
    • 5 of 35 (14%) of oat products contained 20 ppm of gluten or more.
    • 2 or 35 (6%) of oat products contained more than 5 ppm but less than 20 ppm of gluten.

    • Approximately 5% of all gluten-free labeled foods tested at or above 20 ppm of gluten vs 14% of oat products.

    Update October 28th, 2016 - Dietitians in Gluten Intolerance Diseases (DIGID) held a breakfast meeting at this year's Food & Nutrition Conference and Expo (FNCE). Topic: Oats.

    This event was sponsored by purity protocol oats producer, GF Harvest Oats. GF Harvest Oats owner, Seaton Smith was the keynote speaker. A mechanically & optically sorted oats supplier was also asked to participate, but declined to speak. Tricia Thompson, RD, MS of Gluten-Free Watchdog volunteered to present information about sorted oats.

    Tricia was kind enough for create
    a video to accompany the DIGID oats meeting handout. Please have the handout open while watching the video.

    The presentation includes:
    • Basic definitions.
    • Background information on gluten contamination levels found within commercial oats.
    • Gluten content testing results of oats.
    • Testing protocols of millers of mechanically sorted oats (Quaker, General Mills/Cheerios, Grain Millers, La Crosse Milling).
    • A PepsiCo Inc./Quaker Foods and Snacks (QFS) study on testing oats for gluten content. This important study reveals the difficulties in testing grains for gluten. Bottom line: Final product testing for oats must be extensive!

      For an easy-to-understand write up on this study (and links to actual study), please check out "
      Must Read Study Courtesy of Quaker on Testing Oats for Gluten" by Tricia Thompson, RD

    OK - back to the issue at hand…

    Shortly after Cheerios announced their
    recall of 1.8 million boxes due to gluten contamination, Quaker Oats announced they will now be offering “gluten-free" oat products.

    Like General Mills, Quaker Oats will not be using oats grown/harvested/transported using a purity protocol. They are using regular oats that will be "cleaned" via mechanical or optical sorting methods.


    What is a Purity Protocol?

    On April 7th, 2017, Gluten Intolerance Group of North America and four of the largest Purity Protocol oat producers in North America (Montana Gluten Free Processors LLC, Cream Hill Estates, Ltd., Gluten Free Harvest/Canyon Oats, Avena Foods Limited) published a consensus definition of Purity Protocol oats.

    Having a standard definition allows consumers and buyers to know that oat suppliers are following industry-accepted or uniform best practices.

    Protocol Requirements.
    Purity Protocol oat packagers/processor/millers must ensure that their grower network is adhering to the following farm requirements (as specified in grower agreements):

    • Seed Purity: All gluten-free oats must start from seed, either purchased or harvested from the previous crop, that is free from all gluten-containing grains as determined by seed counts.
    • Crop Rotations: Growers shall follow a nongluten crop rotation, or a minimum three-year crop rotation between the last gluten-containing crop and the first pure oat crop, and document all previous crops grown.
    • Isolation Strips: Isolation strips are required between adjacent gluten-containing crops or conventional oat crops and must be a minimum of 6 feet in width.
    • Field Inspection: There must be inspections for potential sources of gluten cross-contamination during the growing season; these should be performed by third party inspectors trained specifically for gluten-free inspection.
    • Traceability: The farm must identify the oats by land location, and document the harvesting equipment, cleaning equipment, transports, storage facilities, and final distribution for the grain from each location.
    • Equipment Cleaning (trucks, cutters, harvesters, augurs, conveyors): Whenever possible, growers should use dedicated equipment. If not, they must use a validated cleaning process prior to handling gluten-free crops. Growers must also maintain documentation of the previous grains in the equipment.
    • Harvest Samples: These must be visually inspected, preferably by a third party laboratory, for purity. Sometimes referred to as a “seed count.”
    • Storage: Dedicated storage should be maintained for gluten-free oats.
    • Cleaned Samples: Growers must visually inspect samples for gluten-containing grains prior to scheduling deliveries.

    Conformance with the grower agreement must be documented either by the grower or through an audit by the purchaser. There must be validation that the grower agreement is in compliance with these requirements through documentation and inspection records. The documentation must be reviewed and verified. Samples must be visually inspected by the purchaser for purity prior to receipt or unloading at the purchaser’s facility.

    Purity Protocol oat packagers/processor/millers must also ensure that they meet the following processing requirements:

    • Dedicated gluten-free receiving systems.
    • Dedicated gluten-free in-process tanks/silos/storage.
    • Dedicated gluten-free grain cleaners, or appropriate procedures for cleaning grain-cleaning equipment and for the storage of portable grain cleaners.
    • Dedicated gluten-free milling equipment.
    • Dust control/collection procedures and schedules for changing or cleaning filters.
    • Dedicated pneumatic equipment/aspirators.
    • Dedicated extrusion equipment, or written procedures for cleaning or purging extrusion equipment, if applicable. Must document purge volume, and that purge material tests negative for gluten prior to beginning gluten-free processing.
    • Dedicated baggers/fillers.
    • Dedicated pre- and postprocess containers (such as totes).
    • Dedicated rail cars, trucks, or transports, or procedures for the cleaning and inspection of rail cars, trucks, or transports used to deliver product to other facilities or customers.
    • Sorting equipment may not be used for oats as a substitute for obtaining purity, but may be used as a supplement to the purity protocol to ensure purity.
    • The final product must meet the 20 ppm threshold in order to be labeled gluten-free in the United States, Canada, Europe, and other countries following the Codex Alimentarius guidelines. The product must meet the regulations for gluten-free labeling in the country of sale.
    • The final product must meet the 10 ppm threshold in order to be certified gluten-free by GFCO.

    While the requirements of the Purity Protocol are excellent for reducing the risk of gluten contamination from wheat, rye, barley, and their hybrids and related grains, these steps do not remove the requirement that the final product be verified as containing less than 20 ppm gluten in order to be labeled gluten-free, or less than 10 ppm gluten to be certified gluten-free by GFCO.

    Definition of the “Purity Protocol” for Producing Gluten-Free Oats
    Read more: http://bit.ly/2oqTmpZ




    What is Mechanical/Optical Sorting?

    Mechanical or optical sorting are methods to remove all unwanted kernels of wheat, barley, and rye from the oats. These processes "clean" regular oats after they've been harvested and transported to the processing facility.

    Mechanical sorting methods of grains and seeds have been around since the late 1960s, according to the USDA. These sorters use a variety of physical characteristics like size, shape, density, texture, terminal velocity, electrical conductivity, color, and resilience.

    As technology advances, these processes improve (but is it enough?) General Mills spent five years and millions of dollars to build a seven-story tall building to "clean" the oats.


    Optical sorting uses high speed, high resolution cameras and proprietary software to detect size, shape, and color parameters. Rejected items are ejected from the system using blasts of precise, high pressure air.


    The jury is still out on the effectiveness of these cleaning methods. Will they create a product that is truly gluten-free? Only time and proper extensive testing will tell.


    Quaker Oats have also opted for the optical and mechanical sorting methods (aka “proprietary”) of removing gluten grains from their oats. However, Quaker Oats reportedly have instituted better testing protocols than their competitor.


    Quaker Oats describes their gluten-free oats processing and testing protocols to Gluten Free Watchdog:
    http://bit.ly/1OiMboT


    Purity Protocol Heros

    Tricia Thompson, RD, founder of
    Gluten Free Watch Dog started building a list of companies that produce and use purity protocol oats.

    Purity Protocol Oats List includes:


    For a detail description of their policies & procedures, and their products, see Gluten-Free Watchdog's webpage:
    http://bit.ly/GFWD-Pure-Oat-Producers


    Take a listen to GF Jules BlogTalk Radio Interview with Seaton Smith of GF Harvest - A Gluten-Free Oats Company. You'll hear how they do gluten-free oats and what it means to their family of celiacs: http://bit.ly/1VwyFEm


    It didn’t go unnoticed that a few popular gluten free companies are missing from the list above.

    Why the fuss over Purity Protocol Oats? Again, it goes back to [the lack of] cross contamination with gluten [wheat, barley, rye].

    For years, the gluten-free community have been told to only use pure, certified gluten-free oats due to the gluten contamination risks. In the past, this meant acceptable oats were produced and processed according to a purity protocol similar to the one described above.

    Most recently, it's been difficult to determine the pedigree of oats used in a product. Companies do not always give clear answers when asked about the oats in their products. As some of the manufacturer's statements have shown (see below), they are using a combination of purity protocol oats and "cleaned" oats, or straight "cleaned" oats.

    For a more detailed look at this aspect, please read Gluten-Free Watchdog's
    "Gluten-free oat production: Purity protocol versus mechanical or optical sorting: Does it matter to you?"


    Purity Protocol Rebels

    Below is a list companies using "cleaned" oats, according to Gluten-Free Watchdog's list.


    Bakery On Main, based in East Hartford, CT

    Statement dated: May 22, 2016 to Gluten-Free Watchdog.

    "A brand and communications marketing associate responded in part (via email on May 22, 2016), “Bakery On Main’s top priority has always been to provide great tasting products that all those with Celiac Disease can trust and know are safe. We recently decided to soon begin using the mechanically sorted oats in some of our products only due to the fact that the supplier that we will be working with has been third party certified gluten free by the GFCO.” Please contact Bakery On Main for more information."


    Bob’s Red Mill, based in Milwaukie, OR

    Statement dated: November 12, 2015

    They first describe their gluten-free product protocol:

    “For all of our gluten free products, we thoroughly batch test every product in our quality control laboratory upon delivery, during production and after packaging. We adhere to a standard of no more than 19 parts per million of gluten. Should a test show that a product exceeds that limit, it would be simply rejected and made unavailable for distribution to anyone. Every step in the production of our gluten free products is done in a separate gluten free packaging division complete with specialized machinery to make sure that our products maintain their purity.”


    Then their oats (note, they use both purity protocol oats and optically sorted oats):

    “Oats require special care to ensure that they are safely free from gluten. Bob’s Red Mill only sources from oat suppliers who are committed to practices for eliminating the presence of gluten. Our suppliers are innovative in controlling the presence of gluten by either avoiding crop rotation with gluten containing grains or using optical sorting technology to remove grain containing gluten. Regardless of our suppliers’ chosen methods for meeting our gluten free specification, we require that each lot is tested and confirmed gluten free before authorization for shipment to Bob’s Red Mill. To ensure that they stay just as gluten free as the day their seedlings sprouted from the earth, we test each batch in our quality control laboratory when they arrive from the farm, during production and once again after they are packaged in our dedicated gluten free facility.”


    Nature's Path, based in Richmond, British Columbia Canada

    Statement dated: November 2, 2015

    They describe their oats:

    “This is to confirm that Natures Path Foods has purchased the Country Choice brand name from Grain Millers. Grain Millers continue to be the supplier of our gluten free oats.”


    Grain Millers have been mechanically separating oats since 2012, according to Gluten Free Watchdog.


    Cream Hill Estates, based in LaSalle, Québec Canada

    Statement dated: March 31st, 2016

    Cream Hill Estates sources our gluten-free oats from a mill that successfully uses extensive mechanical and optical sorting to minimize the likelihood of gluten cross-contamination in their products.

    The mill uses both select commodity and purity protocol oats and does frequent sampling throughout the process from arrival of the oats at the mill to finished product, and we are satisfied that cleaning, sorting, sampling and testing at the mill produce gluten-content results that are well within acceptable limits for celiac disease (CD) and wheat sensitive consumers, including CD members in our own family.

    The mill provides us with test results for each lot number, an 1,800 pound tote bag, and we also do random independent third-party gluten testing of representative samples obtained by us from those totes.

    Test results from the mill and from third-party testing are always less than 10 parts per million (ppm) of gluten with the vast majority being less than 5ppm using S-ELISA and R5-ELISA test methodologies.

    Our products are certified gluten-free by the Gluten Free Certification Organization (GFCO).

    Our dedicated gluten-free manufacturing and packaging facility in Montreal is also free from any of the top 8 food allergens identified by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the 10 priority food allergens identified by Health Canada.

    As a finished food supplier to consumers and an ingredient supplier to manufacturers, we guarantee the purity of our products.”


    Quaker Oats based in Chicago, IL

    Statement updated: January 20th, 2016

    Quaker Gluten-Free Oatmeal
    Quaker uses traditionally grown oats that have been mechanically and optically sorted to be gluten-free.
    
    Finished product testing (as reported to Gluten Free Watchdog and confirmed July, 2016)

    16 pouches or tubes are pulled during a production run (approximately 1 pouch or tube every 1⁄2 hour).

    Note: Approximately 400,000 single serving pouches are produced during a lot run; 50,000 tubes are produced during a lot run.

    A 40-gram sample is taken from each pouch or tube.

    The sample is homogenized.

    Two extractions are taken from the homogenized sample and tested using the Ridascreen Gliadin R5 ELISA (R7001) Mendez Method.

    If any single extraction from any of the 16 pouches or tubes is above 12 ppm gluten the entire lot is discarded.

    Since beginning commercial runs, three early runs were above 12 ppm gluten and these lots were destroyed. Since taking corrective action, 25 additional lots have been run. All but one extraction from finished product gluten-free oatmeal tested below 5 ppm gluten; one extraction tested just above the lower limit of quantification of 5 ppm gluten (6 ppm).

    UPDATE Jan 20, 2016: In email correspondence, Quaker writes, “we have continued to implement the testing protocol we shared with you for finished product. Out of our last 50 lots produced, we have had one lot test above 12 ppm; as a result, that entire lot of finished product was destroyed. All other lots produced met or exceeded our standards and were released into market.”



    Quaker Oats Gluten-Free FAQ - Answers many questions consumers might ask about their oats.


    Yes, even a gluten-free certified product may use mechanically separated or optically sorted oats in their products.

    Bottom line, we don’t always know what type of oats are used in the product unless we ask the food manufacturer.


    The "Mainstreamification" and "Walmarting" of Gluten-Free
    If you're wondering - yes, yes I do like to make up words.

    The gluten-free landscape began its transformation as the gluten-free lifestyle slowly seeped into mainstream consciousness.

    Those of you who have been gluten-free for any length of time, think back to when you first started your journey. How many people had even heard about gluten/celiac disease/non celiac gluten sensitivity/gluten-related disorders? Right, not very many.

    Fast forward to today, gluten-free is everywhere - TV, radio, newspapers, magazines, billboards, on and on. It's even being called *gasp* "a fad diet". We, the gluten-free community have been wanting mainstream recognition for a long time. It may not be in the exact form we were hoping for, but GF is now mainstream.

    The increased awareness is a double edged sword. One of the biggest examples of this is gluten-free food availability. Most of the processed gluten-free foods available today were not available ten or even five years ago. Not all of the changes to the GF food landscape have been beneficial.


    Gluten-Free Foods Market Research
    With this amount of money on the table, it's no surprise companies want a piece of the gluten-free pie. Are the BigFood companies simply chasing the gold-rush of all things labeled gluten-free?


    Back in the day, the small "Mom & Pop" companies built their businesses with hard work and a passion for doing what's right for their gluten-free customers. In many cases, the owners and employees themselves were directly affected by a gluten-related disorder. They knew and fully understood the
    zen of gluten-freedom - in other words - how to do it right. These pioneers have served us well. They brought excellent products to the gluten-free party, however they were often scarce and not widely available.

    Enter stage right, the 800 pound gorillas. These large companies have the means to develop and distribute products faster, farther, and cheaper. All is great, right? What seemed like a great idea at the time just might have been a wolf in sheep's clothing.

    I think you probably know where this is heading. If this sound vaguely familiar to you, there's a reason. It has happened all across America. After retail giant Walmart sets up shop in a town, the economic environment is often times severely damaged, particularly in smaller towns.

    Doing what an 800 pound business gorilla does (
    anything it wants), it forces the small business to close because it's impossible to compete against a giant with deep pockets.


    The Walmart Effect
    • Time.com - The New Way That Walmart is Ruining America's Small Towns - Jan. 25, 2016

      "When a Walmart comes to town, the local economic framework is immediately thrown into turmoil. Many small and regional businesses get trampled by the low prices made possible by the massive economies of scale of the giant retailer. It’s nearly impossible to compete."


    • NYDailyNews.com - Study proves it: Walmart super-stores kill off local small businesses - May 4th, 2011

      "In 2006, the big-box retailer promised to bring jobs to the cash-strapped community. But according to a landmark study by Loyola University, the company's rhetoric didn't match reality: Within two years of Walmart's opening its doors, 82 local stores went out of business."


    We are seeing a similar scenario play out in the gluten-free arena right now. Yep, the 800 pound gorillas (and many smaller primates) are using mechanically/optically separated oats in their products. Not only is this creating a health issue for the gluten-free community, it's also creating a financial problem for the pure oat producers.

    GF Harvest comments on this situation
    via their Facebook Page:

    "We have noticed a change going through the oat market. With once having trucks heading out with 50lb bags to your favorite vendors who use oats in their product. Now we are seeing that that change because of mechanical and optical separation. The part that scares me is that newly diagnosed family or even someone who has been on a gluten free diet for a while. When they are looking at some products that might have oats that could get them sick and they won't know where they got it from, since they say "GF" or even could be certified.

    We want to thank you for your support and want to let you know that we are going to readjust our focus to try and see the best place to serve our gluten free customers. You are like family to us and want to serve you the best we can."


    Powell Tribune
    Gluten Free Oats operation at pivotal point competitively
    by Dave Bonner
    March 28, 2016

    "Planting of 2016 crop tentatively on hold

    Not all gluten-free oats are created equally.

    It’s a reality that has roiled the marketplace for a Powell company, Gluten Free Oats, and its GF Harvest branded oats products.

    The Powell business, now in its 12th year, was founded with the sole purpose of providing gluten-free oats products for the percentage of the population that suffers from celiac disease. The mission is personal for Seaton Smith and his son Forrest Smith, who is credited with the vision for the gluten-free oats start-up as a high school FFA entrepreneurial project.

    Read More…



    So, is there anything we can do support GF Harvest, and other purity protocol oat companies? Of course!

    Questions to ask food manufacturers…
    • Ask directly if any of their gluten-free oats are mechanically or optically sorted. We know they can use a mixture.
    • Ask at what point in production or pre-production they test.
    • Ask how often they test.
    • Ask if they test each final end product, do they test batches.
    • Ask if they are using the fully validated R5 ELISA R7001 Mendez method.
    If they use mechanically/optically sorted oats - tell them you will not buy their products until they use purity protocol oats. Point them to this list: http://bit.ly/GFWD-Pure-Oat-Producers

    Several fellow gluten-free advocates* called for a virtual
    Cash Mob to help our favorite gluten-free oat producer.

    How do you participate in virtual Cash Mob? Simple…just click the links below and order some purity protocol oats!


    Get your pure oats

    GF Harvest offers a $29.95 Pure Oats Starter Pack that includes a bonus "I Make Gluten Free Look Hot" T-shirt or GF Harvest travel cup (while supplies last)
    and FREE SHIPPING.

    GFHarvestStarter

    Look for their products at a local retailor.

    If your favorite store doesn't carry GF Harvest oats,
    give them this handy
    new product request form.

    If all else fails, there's always
    Amazon.



    *Gluten-Free Advocates for Pure Oats*

    In Johanna's Kitchen -
    Support a Gluten-Free Farm and Trust Your Oats


    Celiac In The City -
    Truly Safe Gluten-Free Oats (and helping our farmer friends)!


    Gluten-Free & More.com -
    A Grassroots Cash Mob in the Name of Gluten-Free Oats





    The Risks of Cheating


    This article originally appeared in our January 2016 newsletter. Due to the [unexpected] overwhelming positive feedback, I decided to improve it and post it here.

    I hope you find it helpful.

    Stay strong & keep moving forward.

    Alan Klapperich
    GIG of ECW Branch Manager




    cartoon-sick-face-md
    Currently, a gluten-free diet is the only medical treatment for those with gluten-related disorders. There are no alternative treatment options - no shots, no drugs, no surgeries. However, several pharmaceutical companies are working on treatment options, but they are years - if not decades away from being prescribed by your physician.

    While many find it a blessing their condition can be controlled by a "simple diet" change, others consider it a curse of biblical proportions. It's no secret, transitioning to the gluten-free lifestyle can be tough.
    [Notice the word - lifestyle. The changes required go far beyond just diet.]

    A new lifestyle requires the desire to change, knowledge of how to make the change, and the dedication and motivation to stay the course. Yes, it's quite a departure from the previous lifestyle of eating anything from anywhere at anytime.

    Barriers to Compliance

    When it comes to dietary compliance for the gluten-free diet, there are many barriers that must be broken down:
    • Time constraints for cooking or preparing food
    • Misinformation
    • Lack of knowledge or education (label reading, recognizing gluten)
    • Lack of cooking skills
    • Ability to manage emotions: depression, anxiety, fear
    • Ability to resist temptation
    • Feelings of deprivation
    • Gluten-Free food availability (may be hard to find)
    • Financial restrictions (GF diet can be expensive)
    • Social pressures
    • Peer pressures
    • Travel
    • Lack of symptoms
    • Effectiveness of the diet (it doesn’t appear to help)

    This list seems almost endless, but unfortunately it's still incomplete.

    It seems that removing gluten is easier said than done. Give up the foods that you’ve been eating for your entire life? That’s crazy talk!


    "I need gluten. I can't live without gluten!"

    Ironically, a heroin addict might say something very similar. This is not surprising since narcotics and gluten are addictive. Yes, let’s add "addictive" and "withdrawal symptoms" to the barriers of compliance list.

    Addictive? Withdrawal? Seriously?
    Yes, yes, and yes. Read on Macduff…


    A String of Addictive Pearls

    gliadin mapping fasano

    Think of gluten as a string of pearls that must be broken down into individual pearls [known as amino acids].

    Humans do not have the enzymes to completely break down gluten into individual amino acids.

    Large fragments [known as peptides] of undigested gluten remain after digestion.

    Some of those peptides are known as
    gluteomorphins.

    Due to
    increased intestinal permeability [also known as "Leaky Gut"], the gluteomorphins pass through intestinal wall and enter the blood stream.

    Gluteomorphins react with the opiate receptors in the brain, just like heroin and morphine.

    This reaction creates a craving - generating the desire for more of the substance.

    ~oOo~

    Julianne Taylor, RN at PrimalDocs.com offers up a great explanation on how gluten creates an autoimmune reaction. http://bit.ly/1Pgh6QA

    ….and now, back to our regularly scheduled article…




    Complications of Untreated Celiac Disease

    While it may be easy to rationalize away gluten cheats as simple, temporary aches and pains or as minor [major] inconveniences - beneath the surface, your body could be gearing up for a civil war that would put Gettysburg to shame.
    pacman copy


    A
    2015 study published by The Celiac Center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) found that 75.5% of the study participants had adequate gluten-free diet adherence.

    So what about the other one-fourth (24.5%)? They may be setting themselves up for additional [often serious] medical conditions.

    Some of the possible complications of cheating:

    • Increased risk of heart attacks & stokes
    • Increased risk of blood clots & Deep Vein Venous Thrombosis (DVT)
    • Heart muscle damage
    • Heart rhythm problems
    • Coronary Artery Dissection
    • Anemia
    • Bone loss
    • Cancers
    • Ulcerative jejunitis
    • Collagenous sprue
    • Depression
    • Malnutrition
    • Neurological disorders
    • Infertility
    • Miscarriage
    • Increased risk of triggering additional associated autoimmune conditions
    To learn more about the above list, please check out the following links:

    Cheating on a Gluten Free Diet? Increased Serious Risks May Occur
    by Linda J. Dobberstein, DC
    http://bit.ly/1TDnOnE

    7 Serious Complications of Untreated Celiac Disease
    by Sarah Patrick
    http://bit.ly/1OyRQZE


    Complications of Untreated Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity

    Think you can escape the risks because you have non celiac gluten sensitivity? Sorry, gluten can still rear its ugly head with the likes of:
    • Eczema
    • Psoriasis
    • Depression
    • Peripheral Neuropathy
    • ADHD
    • Multiple Sclerosis
    • Ataxia
    • Diabetes
    • Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (Lou Gerhig's Disease)
    • and potentially much more

    To learn more about the above list, please check out this link:

    3 Reasons Gluten Intolerance May Be More Serious Than Celiac Disease
    by Chris Kresser, M.S., L.Ac
    http://bit.ly/1n5wysf



    ChChChChanges in Behavior


    "Change is not measured in leaps and bounds but in the small steps we take toward a larger goal." ~Claire Dorotik-Nana LMFT


    The
    Barriers to Compliance list above consists of things we can control and things we cannot control. Fear not, this lack of control does not a victim make.

    The good news - we get to choose how we react in those situations; if we don't like it - we can change it.

    The bad news - change is not always easy and requires effort.

    The links below offer some information on how to make the changes that can lead to healthier, happier lives.

    The Stages of Change
    by Kendra Cherry
    http://abt.cm/1ZxH2wA

    This article explores one of the many theories of how change occurs. The Stages of Change model demonstrates that change is not always easy and often requires "baby steps" toward the ultimate goal.

    "Understanding the elements of change, the stages of change, and ways to work through each stage can help you achieve your goals"




    5 Steps to Changing Any Behavior
    by Alex Lickerman, MD

    http://bit.ly/1PCurD7

    Dr. Lickerman's article also explains the Stages of Change model. He shares some wise words:

    "Always remember: none of us was born with any habits at all. They were all learned, and can all, therefore, be unlearned. The question is: how badly do you really want to change?"




    NursingTimes.net Vol 107 No 23 06/11/2014 - "Healthier lifestyles: behaviour change"
    by Nicola Davies
    http://bit.ly/1JPubUJ

    Not necessarily a "how to" piece, but excellent background information is presented. This article is written for nurses and how to best help their patients, but patients can benefit from it as well. It looks as the many factors that influence health-related behaviors as well as several different behavior changing models. Find the method that works best for you.

    "Unhealthy lifestyle choices such as smoking and poor diet are significant and preventable causes of long-term conditions. Nurses are well placed to encourage and support patients to make healthy choices. Through good communication, collaboration and goal-setting, behaviour change is possible. This article discusses evidence for the best ways to initiate and sustain behaviour change."




    How to Withstand Food Peer Pressure
    by Karen Diaz, RD
    http://huff.to/1OMFmKx

    This article does not directly address gluten-free, but it does offer some valuable tips to help combat the pressures that exists.

    When you are trying to listen to your body, food peer pressure can be the last straw making you throw in the towel. Here are four important ways to withstand food peer pressure.



    Gluten-Free Turkeys 2015


    The 2015 holidays are upon us, here is a list of turkeys that are labeled as gluten-free. If a turkey isn't on this list, it may be gluten-free, it just means it wasn't checked.

    Some turkeys are not gluten-free. Always, always, always check the ingredient list! If you are unsure, call the manufacturer and ask questions.

    Be aware that the US Dept. of Agriculture (USDA) regulates labeling for meat, poultry, egg products. USDA regulations for labeling allergens [like wheat] are not the same as the FDA regulations. Companies may voluntarily comply with FDA regs, but they are not required to disclose wheat, or barley, rye, or oats or any derivatives.

    If you see modified food starch, starch, dextrin as ingredients in a USDA product, it's best to call the company to verify the source [are they derived from gluten sources?].

    If you are making a turkey for a gluten-free guest, please read our Guide to Gluten Cross Contamination. They'll love you even more!


    navigatingholidays small
    If this is your first gluten-free holiday season, you might check out our Navigating The Holidays article for some hints and tips.

    "For many, the holiday season is filled with smiles, laughter and lots of merriment. However, for those with dietary restrictions, it can be the complete opposite – fear, dread and lots of worriment."



    festival holiday
    Festival Foods offers a very nice 2015 Gluten-Free Holiday Guide with recipes and product info: http://bit.ly/FestivalFoodsHolidayGuide2015





    Butterball


    Something new! Gluten-Free Holiday Dinner Guide - complete with a few recipes!

    butterball_ismyturkeyGF

    INCREDIBLY EASY GLUTEN FREE TURKEY GUIDE

    Need to prepare a gluten-free holiday dinner? Butterball can help! Our Butterball fresh and frozen raw unstuffed turkeys are always gluten-free, and our gravy pack included with our Butterball Whole and Boneless Breast items is also gluten-free. And for all the trimmings, check out the recipes below to find a variety of gluten-free side dishes and desserts sure to please all your holiday guests.




    ** Note: Stuffing a gluten-free turkey with gluten stuffing contaminates the turkey - it should not be eaten by those following a gluten-free/gluten-zero diet.


    Gluten-Free Butterball Turkeys:

    Fresh Whole Turkey - http://www.butterball.com/products/whole-turkeys/fresh-whole-turkey

    Fresh L'il Butterball - http://www.butterball.com/products/whole-turkeys/fresh-lil-butterball

    Frozen Whole Turkey - http://www.butterball.com/products/whole-turkeys/frozen-whole-turkey

    Frozen L'il Butterball - http://www.butterball.com/products/whole-turkeys/frozen-lil-butterball

    Frozen Fully Cooked Smoked Turkey: http://www.butterball.com/products/whole-turkey/frozen-fully-cooked-smoked-turkey

    Frozen Fully Cooked Baked Turkey: http://www.butterball.com/products/whole-turkey/frozen-fully-cooked-baked-turkey


    Butterball lists several gluten free products on their website. Type type "gluten-free" into their "Search for a product" text box and click Search

    http://www.butterball.com/faqs/product-information/gluten-free

    Q: ARE BUTTERBALL TURKEYS GLUTEN FREE?

    A: With the exception of the seven products listed below, all other retail products produced at Butterball, LLC are gluten free; meaning they contain no wheat, barley, rye, triticale or any triticum species such as spelt or kamut..

    NOT GLUTEN FREE Products:

    22655-07100 Butterball Ready To Cook Premium Stuffed Young Turkey with Herb Roasted Stuffing

    22655-82925 Butterball Fully Cooked Natural Inspirations Meatballs - Original - Bite Sized Original Turkey Meatballs

    22655-82926 Butterball Fully Cooked Natural Inspirations Meatballs - Italian - Dinner Sized

    22655-81005 Butterball Fully Cooked Turkey & Gravy

    22655-60105 Butterball Fully Cooked Chef Selects Turkey Roast with Vegetables

    22655-60106 Butterball Fully Cooked Chef Selects Turkey Meatloaf

    22655-60107 Butterball Fully Cooked Chef Selects Turkey Breast & Gravy

    For our products that are packaged with gravy packets, the gravy packets are gluten free as well. The gravy contains rice flour instead of wheat flour and the modified food starch is corn based (as of 2007).

    However, our product formulations are subject to change. Therefore, please be certain to always read the label for any allergen concerns you may have.



    Butterball Contact:
    http://www.butterball.com/contact-us



    HoneyBaked


    http://www.HoneyBakedOnline.com/category/customer+service/faq.do#10

    Do your hams or turkey breast contain glutens?

    Our hams and turkey breasts DO NOT contain glutens.





    Honeysuckle White


    Honeysuckle White Whole Turkeys:
    Fresh - http://www.honeysucklewhite.com/products/fresh-whole-turkey/
    Frozen - http://www.honeysucklewhite.com/products/frozen-whole-turkey/
    Fully Cooked - http://www.honeysucklewhite.com/products/frozen-avna-whole-turkey/

    Bone-in Turkey Breasts:
    http://www.honeysucklewhite.com/products/frozen-bone-in-turkey-breast-with-gravy/
    http://www.honeysucklewhite.com/products/frozen-bone-in-turkey-breast-2/
    http://www.honeysucklewhite.com/products/fresh-bone-in-turkey-breast/

    Honeysuckle While offers several gluten-free products, however, you have to check each product:
    http://www.honeysucklewhite.com/products/


    Jennie-O Whole Turkeys


    Jenni-O is a Hormel Company. Hormel will clearly gluten (wheat, barley/malt, rye, oats). Hormel's "Product without Gluten Ingredient" List

    Tender & Juicy Young Turkey (Gravy packet contains gluten)
    https://www.jennieo.com/products/124-Tender-and-Juicy-Young-Turkey

    Fresh All Natural Young Turkey
    https://www.jennieo.com/products/125-Fresh-All-Natural-Young-Turkey

    Premium Fresh Young Turkey
    https://www.jennieo.com/products/149-Premium-Fresh-Young-Turkey


    Jennie-O has many items on their gluten-free list.


    Perdue


    Response from Perdue Customer Service 10/29/14 (waiting for 2015 verification)

    http://www.perdue.com/

    Below is a list of the products on the GFCO list.

    All products on this certificate are under the supervision of the Gluten-Free Certification Organization (GFCO).

    UPC
    54394 HARVESTLAND Gluten Free Breaded Chicken Tender Harvestland
    54370 HARVESTLAND Grilled Chicken Breast Strips Harvestland
    80489 PERDUE Simply Smart Gluten Free Breaded Chicken Tender Perdue
    80489 GF Breaded Chicken Tenders Perdue Simply Smart
    97394 SIMPLE TRUTH Gluten Free Breaded Chicken Tender Simple Truth
    97370 SIMPLE TRUTH Grilled Chicken Breast Strips Simple Truth

    UPC
    54241 HARVESTLAND Applewood Smoked Turkey Breast Harvestland
    54700 HARVESTLAND Oven Roasted Boneless Chicken Breast w rib me Harvestland
    54243 HARVESTLAND Oven Roasted Turkey Breast Harvestland
    56250 HARVESTLAND Roasted Turkey Breast Harvestland
    75519 PERDUE® CARVING CLASSICS® Bourbon Peppercorn Chicken Br Perdue
    75546 PERDUE® CARVING CLASSICS® Bourbon Peppercorn Turkey Bre Perdue

    75523PERDUE® CARVING CLASSICS® Buffalo Style Chicken Breast Perdue
    75544 PERDUE® CARVING CLASSICS® Buffalo Style Turkey Breast Perdue
    75525 PERDUE® CARVING CLASSICS® Chicken Breast, Herb Rubbed Perdue
    75520 PERDUE® CARVING CLASSICS® Golden Brown Chicken Breast Perdue
    75548 PERDUE® CARVING CLASSICS® Golden Brown Turkey Breast Perdue
    75540 PERDUE® CARVING CLASSICS® Herb Rubbed Turkey Breast Perdue
    75536 PERDUE® CARVING CLASSICS® Honey Turkey Breast Perdue
    75534 PERDUE® CARVING CLASSICS® Lower Sodium Golden Brown Tu Perdue
    75538 PERDUE® CARVING CLASSICS® Mesquite Smoked Turkey Breast Perdue
    246 PERDUE® SHORT CUTS® Carved Chicken Breast, Grilled (9 oz.) Perdue
    81230 PERDUE® SHORT CUTS® Carved Chicken Breast, Honey Roasted Perdue
    224 PERDUE® SHORT CUTS® Carved Chicken Breast, Honey Roasted Perdue
    81030 PERDUE® SHORT CUTS® Carved Chicken Breast, Original Roaste Perdue
    221 PERDUE® SHORT CUTS® Carved Chicken Breast, Original Roaste Perdue
    222 PERDUE® SHORT CUTS® Carved Chicken Breast, Southwestern Perdue
    235 PERDUE® SHORT CUTS® Carved Turkey Breast, Oven Roasted (9 Perdue
    150 PERDUE® SHORT CUTS® Italian Seasoned Ground Turkey Perdue
    00143 GF Breaded Chicken Tenders Perdue Simply Smart

    Should you have further questions, please feel free to contact a consumer representative at 1-800-473-7383 Monday through Friday 9:30 AM to 6:00 PM ET, or email us at www.Perdue.com.




    Plainville Farms


    http://plainvillefarms.com/faq/

    Is your turkey gluten free?

    Yes, our turkey is gluten free and casein free. However, our turkey gravy and our homestyle dressing contain wheat. Our marinated teriyaki turkey tenderloins contain soy. Please read the ingredients labels.


    Shady Brook Farms


    Fresh Whole Turkey (3% basted):
    http://www.shadybrookfarms.com/products/fresh-whole-turkey-3-basted/

    Fresh Whole Turkey (not basted):
    http://www.shadybrookfarms.com/products/fresh-whole-turkey-0-basted/

    Frozen Whole Turkey (basted):
    http://www.shadybrookfarms.com/products/frozen-whole-turkey-2/




    Hams


    Farmland Hams


    Farmland offers an extensive gluten-free product list: http://www.farmlandfoodservice.com/food/gluten-free-products/

    BILINGUAL, HAM & WATER PRODUCT, 48% AI, GLUTEN FREE

    BONELESS STEAKS HAM W/NJ, FULLY COOKED, GLUTEN FREE

    BONELESS STEAKS HAM W/NJ, HONEY CURED, FULLY COOKED, GLUTEN FREE

    BONELESS STEAKS HAM W/NJ, REDUCED SODIUM, FULLY COOKED, GLUTEN FREE

    COOKED HAM, WATER ADDED, GLUTEN FREE

    COOKED HAM, W/A, 30% LESS SODIUM, GLUTEN FREE

    COOK’S HAM AND WATER PRODUCT, 23% AI, REDUCED SODIUM, GLUTEN FREE

    COOK’S HAM AND WATER PRODUCT, SEMI- BONLESS HALF HAM, REDUCED SODIUM, GLUTEN FREE

    COOK’S HAM AND WATER PRODUCT, STEAK & BUTT PORTIONS, 23% AI, REDUCED SODIUM, GLUTEN FREE

    COOK’S SLICED HAM W/NJ, BREAKFAST SLICED, GLUTEN FREE

    COOK’S BONELESS HAM CHOPS,W/NJ, GLUTEN FREE

    COOK’S BONELESS STEAKS HAM W/NJ, HONEY CURED, FULLY COOKED, GLUTEN FREE

    COOK’S FARMLAND SAFEWAY, HAM, WATER ADDED, GLUTEN FREE

    COOK’S HICKORY SMOKED PORTIONS, STEAKS, & HAMS, GLUTEN FREE

    COOK’S HICKORY SMOKED, WATER ADDED, PORTIONS, STEAKS, & HAMS, GLUTEN FREE

    COOK’S REDUCED SODIUM, HAM STEAK, WATER ADDED, GLUTEN FREE

    DELI STYLE HONEY HAM, WATER ADDED, GLUTEN FREE

    FARMLAND BAVARIAN BRAND HAM, WATER ADDED, GLUTEN FREE

    FARMLAND BLACK FOREST HAM WITH NJ, GLUTEN FREE

    FARMLAND BROWN SUGAR HAM WITH NJ, GLUTEN FREE

    FARMLAND CARVEMASTER FLAT HAM W/NJ, APPLEWOOD SMOKED, GLUTEN FREE

    FARMLAND COOKED HAM WATER ADDED, GLUTEN FREE

    FARMLAND DELI HAM, WATER ADDED, GLUTEN FREE

    FARMLAND JULIENNE HAM STRIPS, WA, GLUTEN FREE

    FARMLAND PREMIUM DELI, CHOPPED HAM WATER ADDED, GLUTEN FREE

    FARMLAND SLICED HAM W/NJ, GLUTEN FREE

    FARMLAND SMB, BREAKFAST HAM, WATER ADDED, GLUTEN FREE

    FARMLAND SPECIAL SELECT BLACK FOREST HAM, WATER ADDED, GLUTEN FREE.

    FARMLAND SPECIAL SELECT BROWN SUGAR CURED HAM, WATER ADDED, GLUTEN FREE

    FARMLAND COOKED HAM, W/A, 30% LESS SODIUM, GLUTEN FREE, SPANISH

    FARMLAND COOKED HAM, W/A, 35% LESS SODIUM, GLUTEN FREE, SPANISH

    FARMLAND COOKED HAM, W/A, 48% LESS SODIUM, GLUTEN FREE, SPANISH

    FARMLAND COOKED HAM, W/A, GLUTEN FREE

    FARMLAND COOKED HAM & WATER PROD, 35% AI, GLUTEN FREE

    FARMLAND COOKED HAM WATER ADDED, GLUTEN FREE

    FARMLAND COUNTRY LEAN BRAND COOKED HAM W/A, GLUTEN FREE

    FARMLAND COUNTRY LEAN CKD HAM & WATER PRODUCT, 48% AI, GLUTEN FREE

    FARMLAND DELI STYLE HONEY HAM, WATER ADDED, GLUTEN FREE

    FARMLAND FULLY COOKED CHOPPED HAM WATER ADDED SAND STYLE, GLUTEN FREE

    FARMLAND GOLD MEDAL BRAND HAM W/NJ, BONELESS, GLUTEN FREE

    FARMLAND HAM & WATER PROD, 35% AI, A PORTION OF GROUND HAM ADDED, GLUTEN FREE

    FARMLAND PIT HAM WATER ADDED, GLUTEN FREE

    FARMLAND ROYAL DANISH BRAND HAM W/NJ, GLUTEN FREE

    FARMLAND SPECIAL SELECT, BLACK FOREST HAM, WATER ADDED, GLUTEN FREE

    FARMLAND SPECIAL SELECT, LOWER SODIUM HAM, WATER ADDED, GLUTEN FREE

    FARMLAND TRADITION HAM WATER ADDED, GLUTEN FREE

    FARMLAND TRADITION HAM WATER ADDED, GLUTEN FREE

    HAM & WATER PRODUCT, 23% AI, GLUTEN FREE

    HAM & WATER PRODUCT, 23% AI, WHOLE, GLUTEN FREE

    HAM & WATER PRODUCT, 35% AI, A PORTION OF GROUND HAM ADDED, GLUTEN FREE

    HAM & WATER PRODUCT, 48% AI, GLUTEN FREE

    HAM MEDALLIONS, BONELESS, W/NJ, FULLY COOKED, GLUTEN FREE

    HAM STEAKS, BONELESS, W/NJ, FULLY COOKED, GLUTEN FREE

    HAM, WATER ADDED, REDUCED SODIUM, STEAKS, BUTT AND SHANK PORTIONS, GLUTEN FREE

    ROYAL DANISH BRAND HAM W/NJ, GLUTEN FREE

    SPRING HILL BRAND COOKED HAM WATER ADDED, GLUTEN FREE

    SPRING HILL BRAND HAM & WATER PRODUCT, 48% AI, GLUTEN FREE




    Hormel


    Hormel's "Product without Gluten Ingredient" List

    Hormel Refrigerated Meat Products Without Gluten Containing Ingredients:

    • HORMEL® BLACK LABEL® Canned Ham

    • HORMEL® CURE 81® Ham and Ham Steaks


    FARMER JOHN® Refrigerated/Frozen Items Without Gluten Containing Ingredients:

    •FARMER JOHN® Boneless Hams – Golden Tradition Premium Original Whole and Half, Golden Tradition Black Forest Premium Black Forest, Pee Wee Half, Golden Tradition Premium Tradition Brown Sugar and Honey, Golden Tradition, Canless Honey Ham (Glaze Packets contain Wheat)

    • FARMER JOHN® Bone In Hams – Premium Butt and Shank Portions, Premium Gold Wrap, Premium Sliced Ham Steaks, Premium Spiral Sliced, Premium Half, Premium Spiral Sliced Half, Whole (Glaze Packets contain Wheat)




    Sugardale Pestige Smoked Ham


    Sugardale offers an extensive gluten-free product list: http://www.sugardale.com/gluteninformation.aspx

    Sugardale Ham Items
    All Sugardale ham items are gluten-free.

    • Country Inn Boneless Hams (whole, half, quarter, sliced quarter, slices)
    • Virginia Classic
    • Prestige Portions
    • Prestige Ham Steaks
    • Old-Fashioned Natural Juice Semi-Boneless Honey Half Ham
    • Skinless Shankless Whole Ham
    • Spiral Sliced Half Ham
    • Semi-Boneless Hams (whole, half)
    • Ham Roast
    • Tavern Boneless Ham








    Wisconsin's Gluten-Free/Celiac Expos 2015

    A list of the gluten-free/celiac expos held in Wisconsin.

    If you know of an expo not listed here, please let us know via this website or Facebook!










    Wisconsin Gluten Free Expo 2015


    Washington County Fair Park & Conference Center
    3000 Pleasant Valley Road
    West Bend, Wisconsin 53095
    877-677-5060

    Saturday, September 26, 2015 - 10:00am to 3:00pm
    10:00am - 3:00pm

    $7 admission for adults 13 and over
    $5 admission for kids 4 to 12 years of age
    3 years and under are free


    http://wiglutenfreeexpo.webs.com/




    Celiac Disease: 10 Things Every Gastro Should Know

    logo2014

    Celiac Disease: Ten Things That Every Gastroenterologist Should Know

    An excellent article published in August 2015 Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology by Amy S. Oxentenko and Joseph A. Murray

    Please share this with your healthcare provider!

    Text Article:
    http://www.cghjournal.org/article/S1542-3565(14)01053-2/fulltext
    PDF:
    http://www.cghjournal.org/article/S1542-3565(14)01053-2/pdf

    Article Outline

    • 1. How to Use Serology to Diagnose Celiac Disease Practical Suggestion
    • 2. Can Celiac Disease Be Recognized Endoscopically?
    • 3. What Biopsies Should Be Taken to Evaluate for Celiac Disease?
    • 4. Which At-Risk Patients Should Be Tested for Celiac Disease?
    • 5. How Does One Evaluate for Celiac Disease in a Patient on a Gluten-Free Diet?
    • 6. How Is Celiac Disease Managed?
    • 7. What Should Be Assessed in the Patient With Newly Diagnosed Celiac Disease?
    • 8. How Are Adherence and Response to a Gluten-Free Diet Measured?
    • 9. What Is the Approach to the Nonresponsive Celiac Patient?
    • 10. What Do We Do With Refractory Celiac Disease?

    "Celiac disease (CD) is increasingly common and topical for both the general and medical communities; therefore, gastroenterologists will be called on for expertise in this area. How CD is diagnosed has changed over time, and confusion abounds regarding the use and interpretation of diagnostic tests, which are often confounded by adoption of the gluten-free diet (GFD). Herein, we address 10 important things that gastroenterologists need to know about CD, which are based on current evidence and our experience in Mayo Clinic’s Celiac Disease Clinic."

    "There are 10 things that all gastroenterologists should know about celiac disease (CD).

    • 1 - The immunoglobulin A tissue transglutaminase is the single best serologic test to use for the detection of CD.

    • 2 - CD can be recognized endoscopically, and water immersion enhances villi detection, although a normal endoscopic appearance does not preclude the diagnosis.

    • 3 - It is recommended that 4 biopsies be taken from the second part of the duodenum and 2 bulb biopsies be taken at the 9 o’clock and 12 o’clock positions to maximize the sensitivity for histologic confirmation of CD.

    • 4 - Consider serologic testing of first-degree relatives, patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, Down’s, Turner’s, and Williams’ syndromes, as well as those with premature osteoporosis, iron deficiency, abnormal liver biochemistries, and other manifestations of CD.

    • 5 - Patients already on a prolonged gluten-free diet (GFD) should be tested for the presence of HLA DQ2 or DQ8, thereby avoiding the need for further evaluation of CD in non-allelic carriers.

    • 6 - The basic treatment of CD is a strict, lifelong GFD, enabled by an expert dietitian.

    • 7 - Newly diagnosed adults with CD should be assessed for micronutrient deficiencies (iron, B12, folate, zinc, copper), fat soluble vitamin deficiencies (vitamin D), and bone densitometry.

    • 8 - All patients diagnosed with CD should have clinical follow-up to ensure response and adherence to a GFD.

    • 9 - In those with persistent or relapsing symptoms, the robustness of the original diagnosis should be reviewed, gluten exposure sought, and a systematic evaluation for alternative and associated diseases performed.

    • 10 - Evaluate those with refractory disease for malignant transformation."

    Celiac Disease Screening Round Up

    Syringe
    A collection of links about screening/testing for celiac disease. These links will list and describe the blood work needed to screen for celiac disease.

    Updated 03/02/17


    Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center - Celiac Center




    Children's Clinic and Allergy Centre - Dr. Rodney Ford

    Gluten Blood Tests. An excellent description of blood tests!
    http://drrodneyford.com/faq/bloods-tests/gluten-blood-tests.html



    University of Chicago - Celiac Disease Center

    Screening for Celiac Disease
    http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/screening/



    Celiac Disease Foundation (CDF)




    Celiac Support Association (CSA)




    Gluten Intolerance Group of North America (GIG)




    HealthNow



    Mayo Clinic - Mayo Medical Laboratories

    "Laboratory algorithms using a reflex approach provide an alternative to ordering individual tests when evaluating a patient with suspected celiac disease. The goal of algorithms is to provide the most appropriate selection of tests for each patient, while maintaining the highest possible sensitivity and specificity."

    An excellent resource for patient and doctor.

    http://www.mayomedicallaboratories.com/articles/features/celiac/



    National Foundation of Celiac Awareness (NFCA)




    Spectrum of gluten-related disorders: consensus on new nomenclature and classification

    This 2012 consensus statement was created by 15 of world's experts on Gluten-Related Disorders.

    http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/10/13

    Diagnostic Flowchart (including blood tests names)
    http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/10/13/figure/F4

    PDF version. This is great handout to give to your healthcare professional.
    http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/1741-7015-10-13.pdf



    Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity: The New Frontier of Gluten Related Disorders

    A 2013 followup to 2012 consensus statement. The experts bring us up to date with what they've learned.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3820047/

    PDF Version. Include this in your handout to your healthcare professional.
    http://bit.ly/29baTsg



    03/02/17 - Added Mayo Labs link
    07/02/16 - Added 2013 The New Frontier of Gluten-related Disorders
    05/21/16 - Fixed broken links
    07/24/15 - Added HealthNow link

    Navigating the Holidays

    navigatingHoliday
    For many, the holiday season is filled with smiles, laughter and lots of merriment. However, for those with dietary restrictions, it can be the complete opposite – fear, dread and lots of worriment.

    The risk of getting sick at every meal is a huge source of stress and concern. Now let's pile on the stress of family dynamics. We've got the fixings for an epic family battle royal.
    "Let's get ready to rumble!"

    “My family puts the FUN in dysfunction”


    I'm sure many can relate to the quote above. If you feel your family is the poster child for dysfunction, do not worry. All families are dysfunctional, it's simply a matter of degree.

    Since the dawn of time, our existence has revolved around the acquisition and sharing of food. We have evolved and times have changed, but the primal need to gather and share food with members of our clan still remains. Holiday celebrations are a perfect example of that.

    If we dig deep inside and look beyond the medical necessity of our food requests, we will find an emotional component. Our requests are an extension of ourselves. When our family and friends fail to acknowledge our food requests, we feel it as exclusion and rejection of us as a person. Maybe it is, maybe it isn't. Sometimes it's hard to tell what is inside the hearts and minds of our loved ones. I suspect the reasons are many and varied. Perhaps it is fear? Maybe they are afraid to try because they don't want to make us sick? Maybe we've yelled at them one too many times about food selection or preparation? What can we do? We have to talk to them.

    tincan phone communication
    Opening up a line of communication is so important when it comes to resolution. Having a calm, heartfelt conversation about our health concerns and what it takes for us to be healthy and happy is the best chance we have at getting them to understand. It is up to us to kindly and respectfully educate them on how to do things correctly, no one else will do it.


    I invite you to read this informative article on Confrontations vs Conversations from PsychCentral: http://bit.ly/1GQw2q1 It offers some great insights…

    Confrontations are usually fueled by anger.
    Conversations are fueled by curiosity.

    Confrontations have an aura of a judicial proceeding.
    Conversations frame a problem as something to be solved.

    Confrontations have an element of moral superiority.
    Conversations happen between equals.

    Confrontations shield the confronter from any responsibility.
    Conversations say “we’re in this together.

    For us today, gluten-free comes as easy as breathing, but it wasn't always that way. We were frustrated and confused, it's reasonable to expect family members will feel the same way. However, their behavior may appear to us as stubborn, unyielding, or uncaring. Remember, listening is a critical component of communication.

    More tips on dealing with lack of support from family members can be found here: http://bit.ly/GIGECW_LackofSupport


    Despite our best efforts, we may have to accept the fact that some people just won't get it. This does not mean we can give up, however! Let's face it, we're up against years, decades, or in some cases centuries of traditions. The very definition of tradition allows it to brazenly flip Change, the bird.

    Trə-ˈdi-shən: a way of thinking, behaving, or doing something that has been used by the people in a particular group, family, society, etc., for a long time.



    "What?! No stuffing inside the turkey? Great-Great Grandma Brunhilde would turn over in her grave if we didn't use her recipe!"

    Changing family traditions is downright heresy. Remember, to your family, gluten-free will be the new kid on the block. Situations like this call for the utmost patience. It may take some time for this concept to percolate through their brains and become a newly added family tradition. Don't panic, stay calm, and keep the lines of communication open. Keep up your educational efforts even if its only small tidbits here and there. Sometimes it's best not to flood them with information – ever try to drink from a fire hose?

    I wish I had one simple answer that would solve every gluten-free holiday and family situation, but I don't. If I did, my name would be Dr. Phil and I'd have a TV show.

    Bottom line – if you cannot resolve any of the food issues, try to put that aside and focus on the people that love and care about you – that is what really matters.

    Here are some tips to get you through the holiday season.

    • If you are brand new to the gluten-free lifestyle, it might help to have some basic information. Please see GIG of ECW's Gluten-Free Diet Boot Camp article: http://bit.ly/GIGECW_GFBootCamp

    • Plain turkey is most generally gluten-free. Read the labels to verify. Several brands will now say "Gluten-Free" or "No Gluten". Make sure it has not been pre-seasoned or marinated; seasonings and marinades may contain gluten. Some turkeys will have a gravy packet. Verify the GF status of the gravy before using. Better yet, ditch the gravy packet and make your own...you'll be glad you did!

    • Like turkey, most hams are GF [read the label], however if it has a glaze, it must be checked.


    • If the turkey has been stuffed with gluten stuffing, do not eat the turkey, it's been contaminated.

    • Stuffing [gluten-free or not gluten-free] made inside the turkey is a food safety concern. If you cook the turkey long enough to properly cook the stuffing [to a temperature of 165], the turkey is dry and over done. If you cook the turkey until it's done, the stuffing may not have reached the food safe temperature of 165. Either way, it's not good eats. Make the turkey and stuffing separately.

    • Cooking bags are commonly used to help keep meats moist. However, the instructions state a tablespoon of flour should be added to the bag and shaken. The flour prevents the bag from exploding. Ask your host about this ahead of time. FYI - cornstarch or gluten-free flour will work too. [I never knew about exploding bags, we always use a bag and never put flour in it.]

    • Mashed potatoes, a GF piece of cake, right? Not so fast, some recipes call for a bit of flour [oh the humanity!]. Scalloped Potatoes is another dish that more than likely has wheat flour. FYI, some potato salad recipes also call for flour. If you don't know how the host prepares their potatoes, it's best to ask.

    • Mainstream "cream of" soups are not gluten-free and so are any dishes made with them, [think Green Bean Casserole].

    GF alternatives from Pacific Natural Foods:
    Cream of Chicken: http://bit.ly/1xlcraE
    Cream of Mushroom:
    http://bit.ly/1tpZIxc


    • Progresso offers their Cream of Mushroom soup, but it's not quite as condensed as actual condensed soup, but with some slight recipe modifications it can be used.

    • Cornbreads or corn muffins often times have a mixture of cornmeal and wheat flour. There several mixes that are available. Krusteaz brand has a pretty good cornbread mix that's available in mainstream grocery stores. http://bit.ly/1pAUT9P

    • Veggie & fruit trays are always popular. Be sure to survey the neighboring foods and assess cross contamination risks.

    • Stay away from the butter dish. It's a crumb magnet!

    • Be wary of communal chip or veggie dips. They might not be GF and they could be contaminated due non-GF snacks.

    • BYOF (Bring your own food). Bringing a dish to pass ensures you'll have something you know is safe. We may feel a bit guilty about asking others to go out of their way to accommodate our requests. Good news! We have the ability be part of the solution instead of the problem. Politely ask the host what you can bring. Ask them to allow you to help. Let them know you want to ease their work load and worry-factor - not add to it - when it comes to making something safe for you. It helps to know what's on the menu so your dish will fit in with the others. Tip: Make sure you bring plenty for yourself and others.

    • Open a line of communication early. It's a delicate topic, but you have to discuss GF food selection and cross contamination concerns with the host if they are not familiar with preparing gluten free dishes. Because they are not immersed in the gluten-free lifestyle, they'll need your help to educate and guide them. The education process is not a "once and done" event, it occurs over time. This is not on their radar 24x7x365, so they will need gentle reminders. Sometimes it's hard for people to grasp, so please be patient if they don't get it right away.



    • Enlist the help of an ambassador. Sometimes it's easier to have another person to be an advocate for you. Ask a brother-in-law, sister-in-law, aunt, uncle, or cousin that you trust to help the host find gluten-free options for you. The more family members you have on your team the easier it will be.

    • Make sure the hosts know that you appreciate their efforts. Thank them, thank them and thank them again.

    • Eat [at least something] before you leave home, it takes the edge off of your hunger.

    • If you like to cook, host the celebration yourself. This gives you ultimate control. If the guests ask to bring something, request things that are naturally gluten-free. Veggie tray, fresh fruit tray, an undressed salad, a bottle of wine or other beverages (not beer unless it's GF), vanilla ice cream (suggest a good brand). Don't be afraid to suggest non-food items: festive napkins, folding chairs, family favorite tableware, etc.

    • If guests do bring gluten items, have a designated area for GF and NGF dishes.


    Inspiration for this article goes to:

    Quick Guide to Holiday Family Dining
    Celebrate Gluten-Free Newsletter Fall 2014
    Gluten Intolerance Group of North America
    https://www.gluten.net/product/gig-membership/

    25 Tips for handling a GF holiday
    Gluten-Free Living - December 2014
    http://www.glutenfreeliving.com/


    Al Klapperich – GIG of ECW Branch Manager


    Thankfully Gluten-Zero

    Thanksgiving table
    As my twelfth gluten-zero Thanksgiving celebration draws ever nearer, I can't help but think back. Honestly, I can not remember the exact details of my first gluten-zero Thanksgiving.

    I'm sure I was a jumble of nerves. I was only 6 months gluten-zero, still trying to get a handle on all of this, not 100% confident in my food choices [no labeling regulations existed in 2003], worried I'd get sick, and then try to explain all of this to family members. GULP!

    I have been graciously blessed and my heart is filled with much gratitude and thanks. I have an amazing wife that has always supported and believed in me, even when I doubted myself. Without her, I would not be what I am today.

    I have the best family and friends. They respect my choices and always watch out for me.

    The members of GIG of ECW and the gluten-zero community in general. It's you, my peeps, that inspire and motivate me, keep driving me forward as a human being and support group leader.

    "The meaning of life is to find your gift. The purpose of life is to give it away."

    ~ Pablo Picasso

    I am eternally thankful for what Melissa Diane Smith calls “The Gift of Gluten-Free”. All those years ago when I was lying on the living room floor in the fetal position, I could not have imagined what was in store for me [besides death]. I gave up gluten, but what I have received in return is beyond measure.

    I realized that I was given an opportunity to use my skills and talents to help others. Heck, there were talents that I didn't even know I had! The biggest item unearthed in me was a passion – a purpose – something that was lacking in my life previously. I was given a gift, and I was shown how to give it away. It was a profound awakening.

    I invite you to think about your gluten-zero life and list the items for which you give thanks. Consider all aspects of your life – physical and mental health; your relationship with friends and family members; your eating habits; your spiritual practices [things that feed your soul]. You might be surprised at the number of items you have on the list!

    I also invite you to inventory your gifts and find out what can be given away. What you receive in return may rock your world. You won't know until you try.

    Stay strong. Be well.

    Your humble servant,

    Al Klapperich – GIG of ECW Branch Manager

    Gluten-Free Turkeys 2014


    The 2014 holidays are upon us, here is a list of turkeys that are gluten-free. If a turkey isn't on this list, it may be gluten-free, it just means it wasn't checked.

    Always, always, always check the ingredient list! If you are unsure, call the manufacturer and ask questions.

    Be aware that the US Dept. of Agriculture (USDA) regulates labeling for meat, poultry, egg products. USDA regulations for labeling allergens [like wheat] are not the same as the FDA regulations. Companies may voluntarily comply with FDA regs, but they are not required to disclose wheat, or barley, rye, or oats or any derivatives.

    If you see modified food starch, starch, dextrin as ingredients in a USDA product, it's best to call the company to verify the source [are they derived from gluten sources?].

    If you are making a turkey for a gluten-free guest, please read our Guide to Gluten Cross Contamination. They'll love you even more!


    navigatingholidays small
    If this is your first gluten-free holiday season, you might check out our Navigating The Holidays article for some hints and tips.

    "For many, the holiday season is filled with smiles, laughter and lots of merriment. However, for those with dietary restrictions, it can be the complete opposite – fear, dread and lots of worriment."



    festival holiday
    Festival Foods offers a very nice Gluten-Free Holiday Guide with recipes and product info: http://eatwell.festfoods.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/Gluten-Free-Holiday-Guide.pdf

    Thanks Andi at Manitowoc CDF Group for sharing!





    Butterball


    Something new! Gluten-Free Holiday Dinner Guide - complete with a few recipes!

    butterball_ismyturkeyGF

    INCREDIBLY EASY GLUTEN FREE TURKEY GUIDE

    Need to prepare a gluten-free holiday dinner? Butterball can help! Our Butterball fresh and frozen raw unstuffed turkeys are always gluten-free, and our gravy pack included with our Butterball Whole and Boneless Breast items is also gluten-free. And for all the trimmings, check out the recipes below to find a variety of gluten-free side dishes and desserts sure to please all your holiday guests.




    ** Note: Stuffing a gluten-free turkey with gluten stuffing contaminates the turkey - it should not be eaten by those following a gluten-free/gluten-zero diet.


    Gluten-Free Butterball Turkeys:

    Fresh Whole Turkey - http://www.butterball.com/products/whole-turkeys/fresh-whole-turkey
    Fresh L'il Butterball - http://www.butterball.com/products/whole-turkeys/fresh-lil-butterball
    Frozen Whole Turkey - http://www.butterball.com/products/whole-turkeys/frozen-whole-turkey
    Frozen L'il Butterball - http://www.butterball.com/products/whole-turkeys/frozen-lil-butterball
    Frozen Fully Cooked Smoked Turkey: http://www.butterball.com/products/whole-turkey/frozen-fully-cooked-smoked-turkey
    Frozen Fully Cooked Baked Turkey: http://www.butterball.com/products/whole-turkey/frozen-fully-cooked-baked-turkey


    Butterball lists several gluten free products on their website. Type type "gluten-free" into their "Search for a product" text box and click Search

    http://www.butterball.com/faqs/product-information/gluten-free

    Q: ARE BUTTERBALL TURKEYS GLUTEN FREE?

    A: With the exception of the nine products listed below, all other retail products produced at Butterball, LLC are gluten free; meaning they contain no wheat, barley, rye, triticale or any triticum species such as spelt or kamut.

    NOT GLUTEN FREE Products:

    22655-07100 Butterball Ready To Cook Premium Stuffed Young Turkey with Herb Roasted Stuffing
    22655-72406 Butterball Fully Cooked Turkey Sliders
    22655-82903/82913 Butterball Fully Cooked Turkey Meatballs-Italian Style Seasoned
    22655-82924 Butterball Fully Cooked All Natural Turkey Meatballs
    22655-82925 Butterball Fully Cooked All Natural Bite Sized Original Turkey Meatballs
    22655-82926 Butterball Fully Cooked All Natural Italian Style Turkey Meatballs
    22655-81005 Butterball Fully Cooked Turkey & Gravy
    22655-60105 Butterball Fully Cooked Chef Selects Turkey Pot Roast with Vegetables
    22655-60106 Butterball Fully Cooked Chef Selects Turkey Meatloaf
    22655-60107 Butterball Fully Cooked Chef Selects Turkey Breast & Gravy

    For our products that are packaged with gravy packets, the gravy packets are gluten free as well. The gravy contains rice flour instead of wheat flour and the modified food starch is corn based.

    However, our product formulations are subject to change. Therefore, please be certain to always read the label for any allergen concerns you may have.



    Butterball Contact:
    http://www.butterball.com/contact-us



    HoneyBaked


    http://www.HoneyBakedOnline.com/category/customer+service/faq.do#10

    Do your hams or turkey breast contain glutens?

    Our hams and turkey breasts DO NOT contain glutens.





    Honeysuckle White


    A link to their Honeysuckle White Whole Turkeys:
    http://www.honeysucklewhite.com/ProductFamilies.aspx?product_category_id=1


    http://www.honeysucklewhite.com/FaqNutrition.aspx#nutrition1

    Does Honeysuckle White® Turkey contain gluten or MSG?

    All of our products are free of MSG.


    The majority of Honeysuckle White® products do not contain Gluten. However, the following list of products do contain Gluten:


    Teriyaki Flavor Turkey Breast Tenderloin
    Frozen Italian Style Meatballs
    Fresh Italian Style Turkey Meatballs


    Always refer to product packaging for accurate ingredient statements.


    We don't use flour on the conveyor belts in any of our Honeysuckle White® processing plants.



    Jennie-O Whole Turkeys


    Jenni-O is a Hormel Company. Hormel will clearly gluten (wheat, barley/malt, rye, oats). Hormel's "Product without Gluten Ingredient" List

    http://www.jennieo.com/products/124-Premium-Basted-Young-Turkey-Frozen
    http://www.jennieo.com/products/125-All-Natural-Fresh-Whole-Turkey
    http://www.jennieo.com/products/149-Premium-Basted-Whole-Turkey-Fresh

    Jennie-O has many items on their gluten-free list.


    Perdue


    Response from Perdue Customer Service 10/29/14:

    http://www.perdue.com/

    Below is a list of the products on the GFCO list.

    All products on this certificate are under the supervision of the Gluten-Free Certification Organization (GFCO).

    UPC
    54394 HARVESTLAND Gluten Free Breaded Chicken Tender Harvestland
    54370 HARVESTLAND Grilled Chicken Breast Strips Harvestland
    80489 PERDUE Simply Smart Gluten Free Breaded Chicken Tender Perdue
    80489 GF Breaded Chicken Tenders Perdue Simply Smart
    97394 SIMPLE TRUTH Gluten Free Breaded Chicken Tender Simple Truth
    97370 SIMPLE TRUTH Grilled Chicken Breast Strips Simple Truth

    UPC
    54241 HARVESTLAND Applewood Smoked Turkey Breast Harvestland
    54700 HARVESTLAND Oven Roasted Boneless Chicken Breast w rib me Harvestland
    54243 HARVESTLAND Oven Roasted Turkey Breast Harvestland
    56250 HARVESTLAND Roasted Turkey Breast Harvestland
    75519 PERDUE® CARVING CLASSICS® Bourbon Peppercorn Chicken Br Perdue
    75546 PERDUE® CARVING CLASSICS® Bourbon Peppercorn Turkey Bre Perdue

    75523PERDUE® CARVING CLASSICS® Buffalo Style Chicken Breast Perdue
    75544 PERDUE® CARVING CLASSICS® Buffalo Style Turkey Breast Perdue
    75525 PERDUE® CARVING CLASSICS® Chicken Breast, Herb Rubbed Perdue
    75520 PERDUE® CARVING CLASSICS® Golden Brown Chicken Breast Perdue
    75548 PERDUE® CARVING CLASSICS® Golden Brown Turkey Breast Perdue
    75540 PERDUE® CARVING CLASSICS® Herb Rubbed Turkey Breast Perdue
    75536 PERDUE® CARVING CLASSICS® Honey Turkey Breast Perdue
    75534 PERDUE® CARVING CLASSICS® Lower Sodium Golden Brown Tu Perdue
    75538 PERDUE® CARVING CLASSICS® Mesquite Smoked Turkey Breast Perdue
    246 PERDUE® SHORT CUTS® Carved Chicken Breast, Grilled (9 oz.) Perdue
    81230 PERDUE® SHORT CUTS® Carved Chicken Breast, Honey Roasted Perdue
    224 PERDUE® SHORT CUTS® Carved Chicken Breast, Honey Roasted Perdue
    81030 PERDUE® SHORT CUTS® Carved Chicken Breast, Original Roaste Perdue
    221 PERDUE® SHORT CUTS® Carved Chicken Breast, Original Roaste Perdue
    222 PERDUE® SHORT CUTS® Carved Chicken Breast, Southwestern Perdue
    235 PERDUE® SHORT CUTS® Carved Turkey Breast, Oven Roasted (9 Perdue
    150 PERDUE® SHORT CUTS® Italian Seasoned Ground Turkey Perdue
    00143 GF Breaded Chicken Tenders Perdue Simply Smart

    Should you have further questions, please feel free to contact a consumer representative at 1-800-473-7383 Monday through Friday 9:30 AM to 6:00 PM ET, or email us at www.Perdue.com.




    Plainville Farms


    http://plainvillefarms.com/faq/

    Is your turkey gluten free?

    Yes, our turkey is gluten free and casein free. However, our turkey gravy and our homestyle dressing contain wheat. Our marinated teriyaki turkey tenderloins contain soy. Please read the ingredients labels.


    Shady Brook Farms


    Fresh Whole Turkey (basted):
    http://www.shadybrookfarms.com/ProductDetail.aspx?product_category_id=10&product_id=611

    Fresh Whole Turkey (no basted):
    http://www.shadybrookfarms.com/ProductDetail.aspx?product_category_id=10&product_id=181

    Frozen Whole Turkey (basted):
    http://www.shadybrookfarms.com/ProductDetail.aspx?product_category_id=10&product_id=412

    This product does not contain Gluten.This product does not contain MSG.






    Hams


    Farmland Hams


    Farmland offers an extensive gluten-free product list: http://www.farmlandfoodservice.com/food/gluten-free-products/

    • BILINGUAL, HAM & WATER PRODUCT, 48% AI, GLUTEN FREE
    • BONELESS STEAKS HAM W/NJ, FULLY COOKED, GLUTEN FREE
    • BONELESS STEAKS HAM W/NJ, HONEY CURED, FULLY COOKED, GLUTEN FREE
    • BONELESS STEAKS HAM W/NJ, REDUCED SODIUM, FULLY COOKED, GLUTEN FREE
    • COOKED HAM, WATER ADDED, GLUTEN FREE
    • COOKED HAM, W/A, 30% LESS SODIUM, GLUTEN FREE
    • COOK’S HAM AND WATER PRODUCT, 23% AI, REDUCED SODIUM, GLUTEN FREE
    • COOK’S HAM AND WATER PRODUCT, SEMI- BONLESS HALF HAM, REDUCED SODIUM, GLUTEN FREE
    • COOK’S HAM AND WATER PRODUCT, STEAK & BUTT PORTIONS, 23% AI, REDUCED SODIUM, GLUTEN FREE
    • COOK’S SLICED HAM W/NJ, BREAKFAST SLICED, GLUTEN FREE
    • COOK’S BONELESS HAM CHOPS,W/NJ, GLUTEN FREE
    • COOK’S BONELESS STEAKS HAM W/NJ, HONEY CURED, FULLY COOKED, GLUTEN FREE
    • COOK’S FARMLAND SAFEWAY, HAM, WATER ADDED, GLUTEN FREE
    • COOK’S HICKORY SMOKED PORTIONS, STEAKS, & HAMS, GLUTEN FREE
    • COOK’S HICKORY SMOKED, WATER ADDED, PORTIONS, STEAKS, & HAMS, GLUTEN FREE
    • COOK’S REDUCED SODIUM, HAM STEAK, WATER ADDED, GLUTEN FREE
    • DELI STYLE HONEY HAM, WATER ADDED, GLUTEN FREE
    • FARMLAND BAVARIAN BRAND HAM, WATER ADDED, GLUTEN FREE
    • FARMLAND BLACK FOREST HAM WITH NJ, GLUTEN FREE
    • FARMLAND BROWN SUGAR HAM WITH NJ, GLUTEN FREE
    • FARMLAND CARVEMASTER FLAT HAM W/NJ, APPLEWOOD SMOKED, GLUTEN FREE
    • FARMLAND COOKED HAM WATER ADDED, GLUTEN FREE
    • FARMLAND DELI HAM, WATER ADDED, GLUTEN FREE
    • FARMLAND JULIENNE HAM STRIPS, WA, GLUTEN FREE
    • FARMLAND PREMIUM DELI, CHOPPED HAM WATER ADDED, GLUTEN FREE
    • FARMLAND SLICED HAM W/NJ, GLUTEN FREE
    • FARMLAND SMB, BREAKFAST HAM, WATER ADDED, GLUTEN FREE
    • FARMLAND SPECIAL SELECT BLACK FOREST HAM, WATER ADDED, GLUTEN FREE.
    • FARMLAND SPECIAL SELECT BROWN SUGAR CURED HAM, WATER ADDED, GLUTEN FREE
    • FARMLAND COOKED HAM, W/A, 30% LESS SODIUM, GLUTEN FREE, SPANISH
    • FARMLAND COOKED HAM, W/A, 35% LESS SODIUM, GLUTEN FREE, SPANISH
    • FARMLAND COOKED HAM, W/A, 48% LESS SODIUM, GLUTEN FREE, SPANISH
    • FARMLAND COOKED HAM, W/A, GLUTEN FREE
    • FARMLAND COOKED HAM & WATER PROD, 35% AI, GLUTEN FREE
    • FARMLAND COOKED HAM WATER ADDED, GLUTEN FREE
    • FARMLAND COUNTRY LEAN BRAND COOKED HAM W/A, GLUTEN FREE
    • FARMLAND COUNTRY LEAN CKD HAM & WATER PRODUCT, 48% AI, GLUTEN FREE
    • FARMLAND DELI STYLE HONEY HAM, WATER ADDED, GLUTEN FREE
    • FARMLAND FULLY COOKED CHOPPED HAM WATER ADDED SAND STYLE, GLUTEN FREE
    • FARMLAND GOLD MEDAL BRAND HAM W/NJ, BONELESS, GLUTEN FREE
    • FARMLAND HAM & WATER PROD, 35% AI, A PORTION OF GROUND HAM ADDED, GLUTEN FREE
    • FARMLAND PIT HAM WATER ADDED, GLUTEN FREE
    • FARMLAND ROYAL DANISH BRAND HAM W/NJ, GLUTEN FREE
    • FARMLAND SPECIAL SELECT, BLACK FOREST HAM, WATER ADDED, GLUTEN FREE
    • FARMLAND SPECIAL SELECT, LOWER SODIUM HAM, WATER ADDED, GLUTEN FREE
    • FARMLAND TRADITION HAM WATER ADDED, GLUTEN FREE
    • FARMLAND TRADITION HAM WATER ADDED, GLUTEN FREE
    • HAM & WATER PRODUCT, 23% AI, GLUTEN FREE
    • HAM & WATER PRODUCT, 23% AI, WHOLE, GLUTEN FREE
    • HAM & WATER PRODUCT, 35% AI, A PORTION OF GROUND HAM ADDED, GLUTEN FREE
    • HAM & WATER PRODUCT, 48% AI, GLUTEN FREE
    • HAM MEDALLIONS, BONELESS, W/NJ, FULLY COOKED, GLUTEN FREE
    • HAM STEAKS, BONELESS, W/NJ, FULLY COOKED, GLUTEN FREE
    • HAM, WATER ADDED, REDUCED SODIUM, STEAKS, BUTT AND SHANK PORTIONS, GLUTEN FREE
    • ROYAL DANISH BRAND HAM W/NJ, GLUTEN FREE
    • SPRING HILL BRAND COOKED HAM WATER ADDED, GLUTEN FREE
    • SPRING HILL BRAND HAM & WATER PRODUCT, 48% AI, GLUTEN FREE



    Hormel


    Hormel's "Product without Gluten Ingredient" List

    Hormel Refrigerated Meat Products Without Gluten Containing Ingredients:

    • HORMEL® CURE 81® Ham and Ham Steaks


    FARMER JOHN® Refrigerated/Frozen Items Without Gluten Containing Ingredients:

    • FARMER JOHN® Boneless Hams – Golden Tradition Premium Original Whole and Half, Golden Tradition Black Forest Premium Black Forest, Pee Wee Half, Golden Tradition Premium Tradition Brown Sugar and Honey, Golden Tradition, Canless Honey Ham (Glaze Packets contain Wheat)

    • FARMER JOHN® Bone In Hams – Premium Butt and Shank Portions, Premium Gold Wrap, Premium Sliced Ham Steaks, Premium Spiral Sliced, Premium Half, Premium Spiral Sliced Half, Whole (Glaze Packets contain Wheat)



    Kretschmar Hams


    You can find Kretschmar products at Festival Food locations.

    http://www.kretschmardeli.com/about

    Kretschmar® Boneless & Bone-in Hams (The company states that “All Kretschmar boneless hams are glutenfree.The Kretschmar bone-in spiral ham itself is gluten free, but the glaze packet is not.”)



    Sugardale Pestige Smoked Ham


    Sugardale offers an extensive gluten-free product list: http://www.sugardale.com/gluteninformation.aspx

    Sugardale Ham Items
    All Sugardale ham items are gluten-free.

    • Country Inn Boneless Hams (whole, half, quarter, sliced quarter, slices)
    • Virginia Classic
    • Prestige Portions
    • Prestige Ham Steaks
    • Old-Fashioned Natural Juice Semi-Boneless Honey Half Ham
    • Skinless Shankless Whole Ham
    • Spiral Sliced Half Ham
    • Semi-Boneless Hams (whole, half)
    • Ham Roast
    • Tavern Boneless Ham




    Updated 11/9/14 - Added more options. Added Festival Foods Holiday GF Guide




    Mood, Behavior, Mental Illness and Gluten

    mood & gluten
    GIG of ECW Newsletter Article - September 2014

    This article was originally titled “Schizophrenia and Gluten”, however shortly after I started writing, the news of Robin Williams' suicide rocked the world. This news hit home on many levels for me. I greatly enjoyed his work. At one time I had committed sizable sections of his standup routine to memory. I was in awe of his comedic genius; how quickly his mind worked and the staggering number of references to people, places, and events he was able to weave together. He was a caring and generous man.

    I am not saying Mr. Williams' problems were connected to gluten, however one cannot help but wonder if removing gluten would've/could've helped him. He was wrestling many demons -
    Lewy Body Dementia, and early stage Parkinson's.

    "The terrorist inside my husband's brain"
    by Susan Schneider Williams, BFA

    An open letter from Susan Williams to Neurology - The Official Journal of the American Academy of Neurology. She describes their struggle with Lewy Body Dementia.

    An excellent read!

    Read More:
    http://bit.ly/2ehdWVQ


    The intent here is not to bore you with medical mumbo jumbo [WARNING: medical mumbo jumbo lies ahead], but the take-away here is simply this:

    Gluten has been shown to affect mood, behavior, and cognitive function.


    "The gut is not like Las Vagas. What happens in the gut, does not stay in the gut."

    ~ Dr. Alessio Fasano


    Remember, gluten can affect any and every organ in the human body – the brain and nervous system are not exempt – even without the presence of celiac disease. Science & medicine are discovering more connections as time goes on.

    The statistics for mental illness in the United States are staggering.
    • One in four [25%] adults experience mental illness in a given year.
    • One in 17 [approx 6%] live with serious conditions like: schizophrenia, major depression, bipolar disorder.
    • Approx. 1.1% of adults live with schizophrenia.
    • Suicide is the tenth leading cause of death in the US (more common than homicide) and third leading cause for ages 15 to 24 year olds.
    • More than 90% of those who die by suicide had one or more mental disorders
    • In 2010, the Center for Disease Control reported 38,364 suicides per year – about 14% more than motor vehicle crashes.
    • $193.2 billion – Lost earnings per year due to mental illness.
    • Veterans account for 20% of suicides. 22 per day.
    • Mood disorders (like depression) are the third most common cause of hospitalization for youth and adults 18 to 44.
    You can find more mental illness statistics in this document from National Alliance of Mental Illness: http://bit.ly/1sMndpF

    After looking at those statistics, sadly, I suspect just about every family has had some experience with mental health issues in some form, be it directly or indirectly. I am no exception. My father was a diagnosed Paranoid Schizophrenic. Like many, he was not compliant with his medication regimen nor did he seek on-going professional help. The consequences of his choices are still rippling outward today, almost 44 years after his suicide. I will always wonder if removing gluten would've altered our family's history; without question it has altered my future.

    Most mainstream medical professionals do not associate gluten with neurological/behavioral disorders. This is unfortunate because Dr. Marios Hadjivassiliou, Professor of Neurology at Sheffield, UK Teaching Hospitals, stated in 2002,“Gluten sensitivity can be primarily and at times exclusively a neurological disease.”
    http://bit.ly/1qXJdf3

    Dr. Hadjivassiliou has done extensive work with a neurological condition called Gluten Ataxia. This condition is characterized by the loss of balance and coordination, visual disturbances, tremors, difficulty in walking. Living Without Feb/March 2011 has an excellent article on this topic -
    http://bit.ly/1u24c0q

    Dr. Hadjivassiliou is not alone in his discoveries. Dr. Rodney Ford, a Pediatric Gastroenterologist/Allergist from Christchurch New Zealand, wrote this medical hypothesis paper in 2009 titled - “The Gluten Syndrome: A Neurological Disease” -
    http://bit.ly/1tkM58j


    “Gluten can cause neurological harm through a combination of cross reacting antibodies, immune complex disease and direct toxicity. These nervous system affects include: dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system, cerebella ataxia, hypotonia, developmental delay, learning disorders, depression, migraine, and headache. If gluten is the putative harmful agent, then there is no requirement to invoke gut damage and nutritional deficiency to explain the myriad of the symptoms experienced by sufferers of celiac disease and gluten-sensitivity. This is called ‘‘The Gluten Syndrome”

    ~ Dr. Rodney Ford.



    Dr. Ford has devoted an entire book on the subject of gluten's effect on our brains. I highly recommend “Gluten Brains” -
    http://bit.ly/GlutenBrains

    “Neurologic and Psychiatric Manifestations of Celiac Disease and Gluten Sensitivity”was published in Psychiatric Quarterly in March 2012 and contains a great summary of a variety of gluten-related conditions.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3641836/


    Neurologic Complications include:

    • Gluten Ataxia
    • Epilepsy and Seizure Disorders
    • Peripheral Neuropathy
    • Inflammatory Myopathies
    • Myelopathies
    • Headache
    • Gluten Encephalopathy (Brain Damage)
    • White matter abnormalities

    Psychiatric Complications include:

    • Anxiety Disorders
    • Depression and Mood Disorders
    • Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)
    • Autism Spectrum Disorders
    • Schizophrenia


    Depression

    Depression is a medical condition that interferes with daily life; affecting thoughts, feelings, behavior, mood and physical health for extended periods of time. Some people may only have one episode of major depression in their lifetime, but often times it is a recurrent issue.

    In celiac disease, nutritional deficiencies from intestinal damage may also contribute to depression. Lack of B-vitamins, specifically B-12 and folic acid have been linked.

    Reports of depression in those with celiac disease began appearing in the 1980s. In 1982, a Swedish study reported “Our results suggest that depressive psychopathology is a feature of adult coeliac disease and may be a consequence of malabsorption”
    http://1.usa.gov/W3jKEB

    A 1998 study shows about one third of diagnosed celiac patients also suffer from depression. Celiac adolescents have higher than normal rates of depression (31% vs 7% of adolescents without celiac).
    http://bit.ly/1qUGi2S

    A large Swedish study published in 2007 compared almost 14,000 celiac patients against almost 67,000 healthy people. Researchers found that celiacs are 80% more likely to experience depression than the general population. They also looked at the celiac-depression relationship in reverse. They found those with depression had a 230% increased risk factor of having celiac disease.
    http://1.usa.gov/1pApGlN

    Women with celiac disease have higher rates of depression than the general population. The risks were highest in those that were not compliant with the gluten-free diet. Even when compliant, women still had higher risks of depression over those without celiac.
    http://bit.ly/W3nKoE

    According to Dr. Tom O'Bryan, children have a 40% increase risk of suicide. Those children with intestinal inflammation [no villi damage yet] have a 96% increased risk.
    http://bit.ly/1rJ7wjo

    Adults diagnosed with celiac disease and/or intestinal inflammation have increased suicide risks as well. Another large study published in 2011 from Sweden shows those with with celiac disease [intestinal damage] had a 55% increased risk factor. Those with intestinal inflammation [no villi damage] had a 96% increased risk.
    http://1.usa.gov/Z4DFFk

    More Gluten & Depression Studies

    “A study has now demonstrated that gluten is independently associated with depression in patients with NCGS.” -
    http://1.usa.gov/1tZiAqc

    “Exposure to gluten specifically induced current feelings of depression.” -
    http://1.usa.gov/1ucfDBZ

    “Lifetime depressive symptoms may be present in one third of the CD patients who adhere to gluten-free diet. Long-term adherence to the gluten-free diet may reduce the risk of current depressive symptoms.” -
    http://1.usa.gov/1qqWZpe


    Schizophrenia

    Schizophrenia is a brain disorder that distorts thinking, behavior, emotions, the perception of reality. Delusions [believe people are try to control them or plotting against them] and hallucinations [hearing voices] are common symptoms.

    There have been observations of Schizophrenia and gluten dating back to the 50's & 60's – also known then as “Bread Madness”.

    In 1953 Dr Lauretta Bender started seeing increased incidences of celiac disease in those with childhood schizophrenia.

    In 1961 Harold Graff, M.D. and Allen Handford M.D. published the case study, “Celiac Syndrome in the Case Histories of Five Schizophrenics”, about five patients with a history of schizophrenia and celiac disease who happened to be admitted to the same psychicatric hospital over the course of 365 days. A most curious observation in facility that had few admissions over the course of a typical year.
    http://bit.ly/1uFm56w

    Dr. F. Curtis Dohan spent most of his career drawing connections between wheat and schizophrenia. He too noticed a number of patients with schizophrenia also had celiac disease – potentially 50 to 100 times the rate that would be expected by mere chance. Beyond these connections, he reported that a gluten-free diet improved some of the newly diagnosed schizophrenics, but not all. 2 out of 17 improved.
    http://bit.ly/1nhCHLw

    In 1966 Dohan published “Wheat Consumption and Hospital Admissions for Schizophrenia During World War II”. He anaylzed the the decreases in hospital admissions for schizophrenia during the wheat shortages in Finland, Norway, Sweden, Canada and the United States during World War II.
    http://bit.ly/1q0nRxU

    Like many pioneers in their field, Dohan was often ridiculed and marginalized for his work [opioid research in mental illness], but he continued publishing his findings. Dohan also demonstrated that schizophrenia was almost non-existant in South Pacific cultures where little to no grains were consumed. When those cultures began to westernize their diet with the consumption of wheat, barley beer, and rice, the prevalence reached European levels.
    http://1.usa.gov/1wYpKja

    Did Dohan find a “scientific smoking gun” linking gluten and schizophrenia – not exactly according to some experts, but his work is now proving to be quite interesting and now beginning to be validated.

    It has only been over the last decade or so that experts have shown gluten's effects on the nervous system. Even to this day experts are still looking indisputable evidence connecting the two conditions.

    In 2012, another study revealed that people with schizophrenia are much more likely than the general population to have an immune response to gluten. When those with schizophrenia and a documented immune response to gluten tried a gluten-free diet, they got better. These results are very promising for those suffering from a neuro-degenerative condition where little else works.

    Not everyone with schizophrenia will see improvements on a gluten-free diet. New research is indicating about 20% may experience measurable improvements. Dr. Alessio Fasano's team have found that roughly 1 in 5 patients with schizophrenia have elevated levels of tTG6 (a new marker indicating gluten-sensitivity). Those patients put on a gluten-free diet were able to control their condition without medication. Promising results indeed!

    More Gluten & Schizophrenia Studies

    “Gluten Sensitivity and Schizophrenia” a PowerPoint presentation by Deanna Kelly, Pharm.D, BCPP Professor of Psychiatry at Univ. of Maryland School of Medicine.
    http://bit.ly/2f4x8pv

    “Emerging scientific literature contains several reports linking gluten sensitivity states with neuropsychiatric manifestations including autism, schizophrenia, and ataxia.”
    http://1.usa.gov/1tkxTvQ

    “A drastic reduction, if not full remission, of schizophrenic symptoms after initiation of gluten withdrawal has been noted in a variety of studies. However, this occurs only in a subset of schizophrenic patients.” -
    http://bit.ly/2kIpUtQ

    “Five biomarkers of gluten sensitivity were found to be significantly elevated in patients with non-affective psychoses (schizophrenia) compared to controls.” -
    http://1.usa.gov/1vXlWL1


    Al Klapperich
    Branch Manager
    Gluten Intolerance Group of East Central WI


    Updated: 02/12/17 - Fix broken schizophrenia study linkUpdated: 11/05/16 - Updated Deanna Kelly's presentation link.
    Updated: 10/09/16 - Add Susan William's letter.


    Be True to Your[gluten-zero]self

    url

    “Your time is limited, so don't waste it living someone else's life. Don't be trapped by dogma - which is living with the results of other people's thinking. Don't let the noise of other's opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition."

    ~ Steve Jobs


    The
    Gluten-Free RN shared this quote on Facebook. Yes, Facebook can be useful and is not a complete waste of time. Steven's words struck a very loud chord in me, much like the startup chime of the Apple Macintosh that Steve Jobs created. The late Steve Jobs imparted this bit of wisdom to the 2005 graduating class of Stanford University. Regardless of Steve's intended audience, I feel these words are quite useful for the gluten-free/zero community, even almost a decade later. Steve Jobs was a visionary on many levels.

    Members of the gluten-free/gluten-zero community have endured a good bit of bashing as of late. Considering the increase in mainstream awareness, I suppose some abuse might be expected. Late night talk show hosts airing "Man on the street" interviews asking "
    What is gluten?" - with embarrassingly incorrect answers. Improperly researched and inaccurate information published in newspaper/magazine/ internet blogs, social media sites like Facebook/Twitter/Tumblr allowing anyone to offer up their [educated and uneducated] opinions on such topics. We can't forget those closest to us - sometimes they can be our toughest critics - perhaps thinking we're just being trendy, wanting attention or special treatment. Yeah, right, we're nothin' but drama queens...

    Add to this cacophony, the mainstream medicine dogma that still exists when it comes to gluten-related disorders. Even though celiac disease is one of the most common life-long disorders, it's still vastly under diagnosed; and don't even get me started on Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity. Healthcare professionals do not recognize the "clinical chameleon" that sits in their exam room. The medical community has come a long way, but many are still behind the times holding fast to what they were taught in medical school - celiac disease is rare and only presents with weight loss and diarrhea.
    You and I know this is total crap [pardon the pun].

    Many in the community will be able squelch all the negativity going on around them. You, who are active in a support group, and those that have properly educated themselves have gone through an annealing process to harden your resolve. I do worry about those that are just starting their journey back to health. For certain, all of that negativity can be emotionally taxing and mentally distracting. Lord knows, I get tired of it. Do they have enough knowledge and commitment to stay the course? Blocking those external voices could mean the difference between success and failure.

    Mr. Jobs was right - our time is limited, and we need to maximize every second we are in an earthly-form. "
    Sick, tired and grumpy" is not the way to go through life. We need to focus on the positive, stand up and advocate for ourselves when it comes to our health. We must block out the noise that can overpower our inner voice - the voice that tells us what it takes to keep our bodies happy and healthy.

    I will leave you with these 5 daily disciplines to stay in a positive state of mind.

    1. Start getting spiritual (feed your soul)
    2. Write a gratitude list
    3. Fill your mind with positive messages
    4. Surround yourself with supportive people
    5. Stay Active

    More details on the disciplines:
    http://bit.ly/PositiveMindTips

    Stay strong. Be well. Keep moving forward!


    Al Klapperich
    Branch Manager
    Gluten Intolerance Group of East Central WI


    Gluten Contamination Eliminiation Diet

    “Trace gluten contamination may play a role in mucosal and clinical recovery in a subgroup of diet-adherent non-responsive celiac disease patients”

    BMC Gastroenterology 2013, 13:40 -
    http://bit.ly/12vSGuD

    Researchers at Johns Hopkins and Center for Celiac Research at Massachusetts General looked at cross contamination of gluten-free products found in a traditional gluten-free diet. They studied 17 patients who had Non Responsive Celiac Disease (NRCD). 6 of these patients met the criteria for Refractory Celiac Disease (RCD).

    NRCD is a general classification term for patients with persistent symptoms and/or intestinal damage despite following a gluten-free diet.

    RCD is a subset of NRCD. RCD is found in adults; middle-aged to elderly. It's never seen in children. In most cases, failure to improve on a gluten-free diet is not RCD. RCD is also further broken down as RCD1 and RCD2. RCD2 has a higher risk of developing intestinal cancer and 5 year death rate of 50-60%.

    Participants of this study were put on a Gluten Contamination Elimination Diet (GCED) for three to six months. This diet consists of whole, unprocessed foods. It was designed to eliminate exposure to any possibility of gluten cross contamination from packaged/processed foods – including those labeled gluten-free. Patients were given sample menus and were asked to keep a food record.
    Foods used in the study
    Allowed Not Allowed
    Grains - Plain, unflavored, brown and white rice Grains - Millet, sorghum, buckwheat or other inherently gluten-free grains, seeds, or flours
    Fruits/Vegetables - All fresh fruits & vegetables Fruits/Vegetables - Frozen canned or dried
    Proteins - Fresh meats, Fresh fish, Eggs, Dried beans, Unseasoned nuts in the shell. Lunch meats, Ham, bacon, Other processed, self-basted or cured meat products
    Dairy - Butter, yogurt (unflavored), milk (unflavored), aged cheeses Dairy - Seasoned or flavored dairy products, Processed cheeses
    Condiments - Oils, vinegar, honey, salts Condiments - Flavored and malt vinegar
    Beverages - 100% fruit/vegetable, Gluten-free supplemental formulas, Gatorade, milk, water  


    The study revealed some interesting results.

    • 14 of the 17 patients experience resolution of their symptoms and normal blood/biopsy results on the GCED.

    • 11 of the 14 successfully returned to a traditional gluten-free diet without return of symptoms.

    • Of the 3 patients that could not return to traditional gluten-free diet - one had a return of symptoms each of the three times they tried to return.

    • 5 of the 6 patients with RCD has full resolution of their symptoms and no longer met the criteria for RCD

    The important take away from this study has to do with ferreting out those that truly have Refractory Celiac Disease. Due to the seriousness of RCD, it is important accurately diagnose this condition.

    The researchers found it interesting that 79% of the test subject were able to return to their traditional gluten-free diet.

    “Interestingly, the fact that the majority of the patients in our study were subsequently able to return to their previous strict GFD suggests that there is a degree of recovery that, once established, shifts these patients back to a more typical threshold of gluten reactivity.”


    While the researchers commented on the ability to return to a traditional gluten-free diet, they didn't really discuss this aspect. It certainly raises several questions.

    1) Once healed, why where most patients able to resume the traditional GF diet?

    Dr. Tom O'Bryan's mantra “Heal the gut, heal the gut, heal the gut” comes to mind.

    2) Long-term will they be able to remain on a traditional GF diet without further complications?

    3) Could those now successfully following a traditional GF diet benefit from the GCED?

    Any reduction [or complete elimination] of processed/packaged foods is beneficial. It gives us the ability to go from gluten-free to gluen-zero.



    Confusing Ingredients - GF or Not GF?

    confused
    If you are new to the gluten-free/gluten zero lifestyle, you've probably already figured out that navigating it isn't always easy.

    So many changes, so many details to remember; enough to make your head spin 'round-n-round. It's no wonder there is fear, dread and confusion.

    Label reading skills are on the "must have" list in order to be successful. [Sorry, this will not be a How to Read Labels article; I'm saving that for another time, but you can learn more about reading labels here and here]

    If you wish to by-pass almost all labeling reading - stick to single-ingredient whole foods. Fresh fruits and veggies, plain meats, seafood and poultry. Ever see an ingredient label on a head of broccoli? By far, this will be your best and most healthiest option.

    However, in the event you find yourself in the packaged food aisles reading labels, you'll run into some strange and confusing ingredients. You'll need to know what they are and if they are gluten-free. Keep in mind, if the ingredient is gluten-free, it does not mean that it's healthy for you. Choose wisely!

    Check out the links below...


    Gluten-Free Living Magazine
    'Ingredients'

    http://www.glutenfreeliving.com/gluten-free-foods/ingredients/ingredients-index/
    Amaranth Herbs Quinoa Tapioca
    Arrowroot HVP or HPP Rice Teff
    Barley Lecithin Rye Teriyaki sauce
    Brewers yeast Malt Seasonings Tofu
    Buckwheat Maltodextrin Seitan Triticale
    Caramel color Millet Soba Vanilla
    Citric Acid Modified food starch Sorghum Vinegar
    Corn Mono and diglycerides Soy Wheat
    Dextrin Montina Soy Sauce Wheat Starch
    Flavors MSG Spelt Whey
    Glucose syrup Oat gum Spices* Xanthan gum
    Gluten Oats Starch Yeast
    Guar Gum Potato Sweet Potato




    Gluten-Free Living Magazine
    'Top 10 Ingredients you really don't need to worry about'

    http://www.glutenfreeliving.com/the-magazine/featured-stories/top-10-ingredients-you-really-dont-need-to-worry-about/
    1. Caramel Color 4. Glucose Syrup 7. Maltodextrin 10. Vinegar
    2. Citric Acid 5. Glue (envelopes) 8. Mono and diglycerides
    3. Dextrose 6. Hydrolyzed Vegetable Protein and Hydrolyzed Plant Protein 9. Spices*



    *Ground spices have been undergoing some investigation as of late. While single spices are inherently gluten-free, testing is beginning to show that various levels of contamination can be found - even if the spices are processed in a facility without gluten [they are presumably coming in contaminated].

    Please check out these links...

    Gluten Free Watchdog Report: Gluten Contamination of Spices
    https://www.glutenfreewatchdog.org/reports/Gluten_Free_Watchdog_Special_Report_on_Spices_Public.pdf

    Canadian Food Inspection Agency Report: Gluten in Ground Spices
    http://www.celiaccentral.org/celiac-disease-in-the-news/Celiac-in-the-News/161/vobid--10269/

    http://allergicliving.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/Gluten_Report-FSAP-FY301-FINAL-FORMATTED-EN.pdf



    Printer Friendly




    Updated: 12/10/15 - Fixed Gluten-Free Living link for Ingredients.

    Growing Pains of the Gluten-Free Community

    I'm sure we've all been in similar situations. We meet someone - they find out we are gluten-free - they excitedly tell us they are “gluten-free, most of the time” or “cutting back on gluten” or “using gluten-free to lose weight”. Phrases and attitudes like that usually are enough to make our blood boil. Don't they know how serious this is? This is not just another fad diet. Don't they realize they can't pick and choose when to be gluten-free or only when it's convenient? Don't they know this type of behavior is bad press for those that really need to be gluten-free? “Bang – Zoom! You're going to the moon!

    Those of you who have been gluten-free for any length of time, think back to when you first went gluten-free. How many people had even heard about gluten/celiac disease/Non Celiac Gluten Sensitivity/gluten-related disorders? Right, not very many. Fast forward to today, we're seeing gluten-free everywhere. So much in fact that it's being called *gasp* "a fad diet". We, the gluten-free community have been wanting mainstream recognition for a long time. It may not be in the exact form we were hoping for, but GF is now mainstream!

    Mintel, a global market research firm predicts retail sales of GF foods and beverages to reach $10.5 billion this year and will grow to $15.6 billion by 2016. They also revealed that 75% of consumers [without CD or NCGS] ate gluten-free foods because they thought the foods were healthier. Some 24% of consumers eat or have someone in their household who eats gluten-free foods. It's very clear this market is not being driven only by those with celiac/gluten-sensitivity.

    It's also clear that many people are misinformed and some are probably eating gluten-free for all the “wrong” reasons. Most certainly some confusion is being generated by the “gluten-free dabblers” [those that are experimenting]. Yes, there is a bit of turbulence, but we need to control it best we can and ride it out. The current environment may not be optimal, but I think we are seeing “growing pains” as our society comes to grip with gluten and its effects. Things are in a state of flux right now. The packaged food industry, hospitality industry, food service professionals, health care professionals are all trying to figure out how to deal with the gluten-free phenomenon. We know all too well that some are doing better than others at navigating the uncharted gluten-free waters.

    As the researchers keep digging, they keep finding more evidence of harm that gluten is inflicting. Americans have shorter life spans and more illnesses than other comparable high-income countries. It's no secret that on average, we are an unhealthy nation. People are sick and tired of feeling sick and tired so they seek out solutions. Some are willing to take matters into their own hands because many of the medical professionals have some catching up to do when it comes to gluten-related disorders.

    pro-cess: a series of actions or steps taken in order to achieve a particular end.

    Let's take a look at this situation in a different way. I think we can all agree that the path to gluten-freedom is a process. We didn't wake up one morning with this all-encompassing knowledge about gluten-free. It took time for us to build our knowledge base. We all had a starting point; we all took our wobbly first steps.

    The journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step”
    ~ Lao-Tsu, Chinese Philosopher

    What if this is a dabbler's first step in their journey? After my biopsies came back negative, I decided to do dietary trials, I went off and on gluten several times over three or four months in order to figure out what was going on. Yup, I was a “GF dabbler”. However, once I figured out gluten was an issue for me, it was hasta la vista, baby! It's been over 10 years since gluten has intentionally touched my lips.

    Even though people may be misinformed or have a misunderstanding as to why they are trying gluten-free, they may unexpectedly realize relief from other physical ailments. They might have a “light bulb” moment that could be life-altering for them, their children and future generations of their family.

    As frustrating as some of our encounters may be, perhaps being supportive is the best role for us to play. While we may never fully understand or know the true intent of those seeking answers by experimentation, don't they deserve the benefit of the doubt? If I hadn't received support before, during and after my trials, things might have turned out differently. What if we are the only supportive people they encounter while doing this?

    Those of us that live this 24/7/365 are the ambassadors of the gluten-free lifestyle. It is our responsibility to educate the masses. If not us – who will? For certain this is a Herculean task, but at least it's easier than herding cats.

    Actions speak louder than words

    There are leaders and those who lead. Leaders typically hold a position of power or authority. Those who lead have the ability to inspire without power or authority. We only need to look to Mahatma Gandhi, Martin Luther King, Jr. and Nelson Mandela as perfect examples of those who lead. We may not possess that amount of fame, but that's the beauty of "those who lead" - we don't need it. Each one of us can inspire others simply by leading by example. We chose not to be a victim; not to give up and say "I can't do this gluten-free thing, it's too hard". We chose to be successful. Every time we opt out from an opportunity to cheat, we show others that we take our health and lifestyle seriously. Indeed our actions can speak louder than words.

    ...but words are still important

    Every day we can find gluten free teachable moments, they're all around us. A simple and polite "No thank you, I am gluten-zero because the gluten in those donuts make me sick" when the quickie-mart employee asks if we want 3-for-a-dollar donuts as we pay for gasoline. How about a respectful interchange of facts with those that are "gluten-free most of the time". Better yet, invite them to a local support group meeting, so they can really learn what gluten-free is all about. Sharing educational information with your health care team members [doctor, dentist, pharmacist, etc]. Speaking to food service professionals about gluten-free dining options [or lack there of]. Bringing a plate of your killer peanut butter cookies to [anonymously] share at work; specially for that co-worker who turns up their nose at your "icky gluten-free food". Of course, you don't tell anyone they are gluten-free until Mr/Mrs Food Snob proclaims them as "The Best!". Ah sweet justice.

    Gluten-free awareness is continuing to grow, but we need everyone's help. In order to raise awareness properly, everyone in the gluten-free community must keep educating, motivating and advocating.

    Keep up the great work everyone!


    Alan Klapperich - Branch Manager
    GIG of East Central Wisconsin

    Gluten-Free Diet Boot Camp


    I often get asked for information on celiac disease and gluten-free. Either it's someone that is just starting to investigate gluten as the source of their health issues, or it's someone that is just newly diagnosed and looking how/where to start. So, I gathered up a bunch of resources and created this document. The original Gluten-Free Diet Boot Camp was created in 2005. What you see here is an updated version of it.

    I am throwing A LOT stuff out here, please don't let it overwhelm you. If your head starts spinning, stop reading for awhile. While it may be very confusing to you right now, please know that it does get easier - it really does.


    Alan Klapperich - Branch Manager
    GIG of East Central Wisconsin
    http://gigofecw.org/
    http://www.facebook.com/GIGofECW

    Revised: 11/27/16 - see bottom of page for details



    Gluten-Free Diet Boot Camp


    Note: Before traveling too far down the gluten free path, it is best to get tested for celiac disease and/or gluten sensitivity. Why? In order for testing to be as accurate as possible, you must be consuming gluten.

    More information on celiac disease screening:
    http://bit.ly/GIGECW_CD_Screening

    After you’ve been told you must go gluten-free, you naturally think, “Now what am I going eat?”. The more you think about it, the more you realize how big a task this is going to be. When faced with a large task I like to break it down into smaller, more manageable chunks. It makes things less overwhelming if you can focus on one small task at a time. Remember, more than likely you didn't get into this situation in one day, so how can you expect to know everything about a gluten free diet in one day?

    The most important tool you can have when dealing with this is KNOWLEDGE. Knowledge means health. The more you know (about yourself, about your food, about this condition), the better you will feel.

    Step 1 - Relax. This is not the end of the world! While it will take some time (it took me about 3 months to get used to it and one year to feel fully comfortable) for you to settle into the GF lifestyle, it is very do-able. It takes a bit of knowledge and a bit of planning. Many people all over the world live this way. Currently, it is now easier to maintain a GF lifestyle than any other time in history. More & more the awareness of this is being brought to the forefront of our society. Is it where it needs to be? Certainly not! But things are going in the right direction. There are so many GF food options now (this doesn't mean they are generally healthy though). Gone are the days of 20 years ago when it was the rice and banana diet. Fear not...you will not starve! The good new is that there are many, many foods that are naturally gluten-free - and darn tasty!

    Understand that you may go through
    a grieving process upon giving up gluten and leaving your old lifestyle behind. This is common, normal and healthy. Do not suppress these emotions - recognize them and deal with them.

    Step 2: Identify & remove the obvious foods from your diet. This is usually quite "easy" to do. I don't mean emotionally or physically easy to do, but easy to identify. Gluten is generic term for the proteins found in wheat (durum, graham, kamut, semolina, spelt), barley, rye & triticale (hybrid of wheat & rye). Any product made with or contaminated by these ingredients is off-limits - breads, crackers, cereals, pasta, pizza, cakes, pies, cookies, many soups, etc. Don't forget beer.

    The best (and simplest) recommendation I can give you when going gluten-free (GF)...stick to single-ingredient,"whole" foods.

    Whole foods are foods that have little or minimal processing done to them. Anytime a food is processed, there's a good chance gluten is added to it either by design or by accident [cross contact].

    Think fresh fruits and veggies, plain meats, poultry, seafood, eggs.

    Avoid products with marinades, sauces or seasonings-they may contain gluten.

    Finding gluten in a head of lettuce or a bunch of carrots is pretty hard to do. After you start to feel better you can branch out a bit more in to the processed food if you wish, however I know many people stick to the whole foods.

    Tip: shop the outside perimeter of the store. Usually this is where you find the produce, eggs, plain meats, etc.

    Tip: Stick to foods with short ingredient lists - the shorter the better. It's better for you and requires much less reading. The best - single ingredient foods.


    Step 3: Look for hidden gluten. This may take you some time for figure out. You WILL become a label reader. In order to stay healthy you will need to check every ingredient in every product you come in contact with - both ingested and topical. Be prepared to spend a couple of hours getting groceries. It will take that long due to label reading. After you read a few labels, you'll know why I suggested focusing on whole, single ingredient foods. Processed foods are a minefield when it comes to reading labels to determine if there's gluten. Not much to read on a head of broccoli, a bag of carrots, a head of lettuce, etc.

    If you do buy processed/packaged foods check the ingredient label. If you see any of these words: Barley, Malt, Malt Flavoring, Malt Vinegar, Rye, Triticale, Wheat (Durum, Graham, Kamut, Semolina, Spelt), Brewer's Yeast - put the product down. If you can't tell from the ingredient list, call the manufacturer and ask them. Also look for a gluten-free certification. This seal tells you the manufacturer has specific standards, policies & procedures for making gluten-free foods. If you are unsure about a product, don’t eat it.

    Avoid commercial or mainstream oats [think Quaker Oats] or products that use them because they can have
    high levels of gluten due to cross contamination. Pure, uncontaminated gluten-free oats can be tolerated by many, but for right now - this minute, no oats. Oats have been controversial for decades, please look at all the information before you decided to add oats to your diet. Please see our Oats section below for more information.

    Other areas to look for gluten - medications, vitamins/nutritional supplements, cosmetics, soaps, shampoos, toothpastes, etc.

    If a gluten-free food has cross contact with gluten, it’s off-limits. It only takes a crumb for many to get sick. Crumbs matter? Yes crumbs matter! It only takes a small amount of gluten to put your body into an inflammatory state.

    ZERO gluten should be the ultimate goal for everyone following a gluten-free diet.

    Have you double dipped in the peanut butter, Mayo jar, jam/jelly jar, butter dish, etc.? It's contaminated.

    The best thing to do is go on a cleaning spree. Remove everything from your cupboards. Toss the gluten filled/contaminated junk and meticulously clean everywhere with hot soapy water - changing it often. Even move the stove and fridge!

    A gluten-free diet is not like a diabetic diet where you can balance it out. There is no room for cheating. Everyone one will have different sensitivities to the gluten they might ingest. Some may be dreadfully sick for days/weeks from the smallest crumb. Others, may only have reflux, gas, bloating. Some won't have any reaction at all! Even though you may not be able to feel the effects of gluten, your body's immune system is in overdrive. Not adhering to the diet leads to nasty outcomes...the possibility of cancer and a cascade-effect of other auto-immune diseases.

    Step 4: Join a local support group. As good as online sites are, there is nothing that can replace face-to-face, human interaction. They can direct you to local resources. Support comes in many different ways. Let's face it, any time you make a lifestyle change, it's not easy! It's not easy for you, it's not easy for your loved ones. Often times spouses, family & friends may not always understand exactly what you are going thru. They may not understand how vigilant you must be at keeping gluten out of your diet. In fact, unsupportive friends and family can be a huge detriment to your success; surrounding yourself positivity gives you the best environment to flourish.

    One way to make it easier is to meet with others that walk in your shoes. They know where you've come from, they know what you're going through. They understand. Understanding is not something you always find in the gluten free lifestyle. You find out that you're not alone.

    Connecting with others that share your same situation can give you a huge boost emotionally and physically. Many others experience the same trials and tribulations you do.


    General Information Links


    Gluten Intolerance Group of North America: Celiac Disease
    http://www.gluten.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/EDU_CD_6.3.14.pdf

    Gluten Intolerance Group of North America: Non Celiac Gluten Sensitivity
    http://www.gluten.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/glutensensitivity-08-2012.pdf

    Gluten Intolerance Group of North America: Getting Started
    https://www.gluten.org/resources/getting-started/

    Gluten Intolerance Group of North America: Reading Labels
    http://www.gluten.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/Label-reading.pdf

    Gluten Intolerance Group of North America: Educational Bulletins
    https://www.gluten.org/resources/getting-started/

    Gluten Intolerance Group of North America: Quick Start Diet Guide
    http://www.gluten.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/QuickStartGuide-Website.pdf

    Gluten Intolerance Group of North America: The Gluten-Free Nutrition Guide - Optimizing the Gluten-Free Diet
    http://www.gluten.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/EDU_GFNtrtnGd_8-16-11.pdf

    Gluten Intolerance Group of North America: Easy-to-Find and Easy-to-Fix food ideas PDF
    https://www.gluten.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/EDU_Easy-to-find-and-fix_5.2016.pdf

    10 Must-Do's for Newly Diagnosed Celiacs by Jules E. Dowler Shepard
    http://www.livingwithout.com/issues/4_6/newly_diagnosed_celiacs-1824-1.html?s=FB050414


    A collection of lifestyle management articles that I've written.

    Grain-Free for the Gluten-Free
    http://bit.ly/GIGECW-GrainFreeGlutenFree

    Gluten-Free Gratitude
    http://bit.ly/GIGECW-Gratitude

    May Contain - Voluntary Advisory Statements
    http://bit.ly/GIGECW-MayContain

    Becoming a Gluten-Free Champion
    http://bit.ly/GIGECW-Champion

    What Oats Through Yonder Package Breaks?
    http://bit.ly/GIGECW-PureOats

    The Risks of Cheating
    http://bit.ly/GIGECW_Cheating

    Navigating the Holidays
    http://bit.ly/GIGECW_Navigate_Holidays

    Confusing Ingredients - GF or Not GF?
    http://bit.ly/GIGECW_ConfusingIngreds

    Back to School Resources
    http://bit.ly/GIGECW_BackToSchool

    Guide to Gluten Cross Contamination
    http://bit.ly/GIGECW_GlutenContamination

    Grieving the Loss of Gluten - (Published in Gluten Intolerance Group of North America's Quarterly Magazine Celebrate Gluten-Free Winter 2013)
    http://bit.ly/GIGECW_Grief

    Lack of Support From Family - (Published in Gluten Intolerance Group of North America's Quarterly Magazine Celebrate Gluten-Free Spring 2013)
    http://bit.ly/GIGECW_LackofSupport

    Educating Family & Friends About Gluten-Free - A collection of resources I assembled over the years to educate others. Includes a Powerpoint presentation I did for our church.
    http://bit.ly/GIGECW_EducatingFamilyFriends

    A Day in the Life: Living in a Mixed House - This is how we deal with having gluten in our house (I'm GF, my wife is not, but she's getting closer. YAY!)
    http://bit.ly/GIGECW_MixedHouse

    Better Living Thru GF Chemistry - A primer on medications.
    http://bit.ly/GIGECW_GFChemistry

    Gluten-Free Cosmetics and Hair Care Products - Gluten on the Skin?
    http://www.gigofecw.org/news/files/gf_cosmetics_hair_skin_care.php

    GIG of ECW Newsletters
    http://bit.ly/GIGECW_Newsletters


    Support Groups


    A list of WI support groups :
    http://www.gigofecw.org/support/wisupportgroups/wisupportgroups.html

    Search for a support group in your area:
    http://www.gigofecw.org/support/supportgroupwebsites/supportgroupwebsites.html


    Books


    Celiac Disease: A Hidden Epidemic (Revised and Updated Edition)
    by Peter H.R. Green M.D. and Rory Jones

    http://amzn.to/1OmJHJT

    Gluten Freedom: The Nation's Leading Expert Offers the Essential Guide to a Healthy, Gluten-Free Lifestyle
    by Alessio Fasano M.D. and Susie Flaherty

    http://amzn.to/1X5JImX

    Gluten: Worth the Risk?, Gluten-Related Disorder: Sick? Tired? Grumpy?, Gluten: ZERO Global, Gluten Brains: the brain-grain connection, The Gluten Syndrome: is wheat causing your harm?
    by Dr. Rodney Ford

    http://bit.ly/1NsxD9I

    The First Year: Celiac Disease and Living Gluten-Free: An Essential Guide for the Newly Diagnosed
    by Jules E. Dowler Shepard

    http://amzn.to/1TJieOP


    Magazines & Publications


    Delight Gluten-Free
    http://delightglutenfree.com

    Gluten-Free Living
    http://www.glutenfreeliving.com

    Journal of Gluten Sensitivity
    http://bit.ly/1WtwaDp

    Living Without's Gluten-Free & More
    http://www.glutenfreeandmore.com

    Simply Gluten-Free
    https://simplygluten-free.com/


    Recipes


    GF Recipes can be found simply by searching the internet. There are so many bloggers and websites that offer GF recipes, it's amazing. A lot can be found on Facebook.

    Here are just a few...

    Recipes for most of our meals are posted on our group's website, as well as Peggy's [my wife] baked goods

    You'll notice that many of our recipes are pretty simple. I really like taking simple ingredients and making amazing meals. It's truly a case of
    "The whole is greater than the sum of it's parts". We do a fair amount of entertaining and hosting of family events [because we both like to cook and because it's easier for us to control the food]. Our goal is to show that gluten-free food is not taste-free, crappy food. We are successful at it if I do say so myself.

    http://www.gigofecw.org/recipes/recipes.php

    Gluten-Free Girl and the Chef (Shauna James - well known GF blogger)
    http://glutenfreegirl.com/gluten-free-recipes/

    Ginger Lemon Girl
    http://gingerlemongirl.blogspot.com/p/recipes.html

    Beth Hilson (founder of Gluten-Free Pantry Products)
    http://glutenfreemakeovers.com/category/recipes/

    Carol Fenster
    http://carolfenstercooks.com/

    Annalise Roberts - Gluten-Free Baking Archive
    http://www.foodphilosopher.com/assets/docs/glutenarchive.cfm

    Annalise Roberts - Gluten-Free Cooking Archive
    http://www.foodphilosopher.com/assets/docs/menuarchive.cfm

    Betty Crocker Gluten-Free Recipes (General Mills)
    http://www.bettycrocker.com/recipes/health-and-diet/gluten-free


    Gluten-Free Shopping Guide


    This is a published list of products that are gluten-free. Please keep in mind, you still need to read labels and sometimes verify GF status with manufacturers as ingredient lists can change - generally without notice. Use this guide, as a guide, not as the sole means of determining the GF status of a food.

    http://www.ceceliasmarketplace.com/


    Gluten-Free Apps for Mobile Devices


    A review of the top 10 GF apps:
    http://www.todaysdietitian.com/newarchives/021313p16.shtml

    http://www.eatright.org/Media/content.aspx?id=6442467101#.UaV0EOB_aqA

    http://celiacdisease.about.com/od/sociallifestyleresources/tp/Gluten-Free-Iphone-Apps-To-Help-You-Shop-Eat-Out.htm

    http://glutenfreepassport.com/allergy-gluten-free-apps/


    Local Gluten-Free Shopping


    http://www.gigofecw.org/shopping/shopping.html



    Confusing Ingredients


    Some ingredients can be quite confusing. Check out these links for some clarification...

    http://www.gigofecw.org/news/files/confusing_ingredients.php



    Oats


    The safety of oats for those on a gluten-free diet is a topic that has been debated for decades...and it still continues today. Please research this topic carefully before making your decision about oats.

    What oats are used in gluten-free products?

    This article examines the difference between Purity Protocol Oats vs Mechanically/Optically Sorted oats…and why it matters.

    http://bit.ly/GIGECW-PureOats


    I can't eat gluten. Can I safely include oats in my gluten-free diet?
    By Jane Anderson

    http://celiacdisease.about.com/od/Gluten-Free-Grains/f/Oat-Safety-Gluten-Free-Diet.htm


    Canadian Celiac Association

    This statement is under review by the CCA Professional Advisory Board, June 2014
    Position Statement on Oats

    The safety of oats in individuals with celiac disease has been extensively investigated. Clinical evidence from numerous studies indicate that consumption of pure oats, uncontaminated with gluten from wheat, rye or barley, is safe for most individuals with celiac disease in the amount of 50 to 70 grams per day (1/2 – 3/4 cup dry rolled oats) for adults, and 20 to 25 grams per day (1/4 cup dry rolled oats) for children with celiac disease. These studies were up to seven years in length, used uncontaminated oats, but involved a limited number of subjects.

    A small number of individuals with celiac disease may not tolerate even pure, uncontaminated oats. To ensure that persons with celiac disease are not intolerant to pure, uncontaminated oats, before incorporating oats into their diet they should be well controlled on a gluten-free diet, with no gastrointestinal complaints.

    In Canada and the USA, pure and uncontaminated oats are produced by specialty manufacturers. These oats have been grown on dedicated fields; stored, transported and processed in a dedicated gluten-free facility and tested for gluten. These oats should not exceed the action level of 20 ppm (parts per million) of gluten as detected using current available methods. Individuals s with celiac disease and other gluten-related disorders who wish to add oats or oat products to their diet must ensure that the oats they are eating are free from contamination with gluten from wheat, rye and barley. Oats available in the marketplace labeled as “pure” are not free of gluten contamination and should not be consumed.

    The Canadian Celiac Association’s (CCA) position on the safety of pure, uncontaminated oats is supported by Health Canada. Their review entitled Celiac Disease and the Safety of Oats is available on the Health Canada website

    The safety of oats in non-celiac gluten sensitivity has not been studied. The CCA will continue to monitor the scientific developments in the area of oats in celiac disease and other gluten-related disorders and will keep its members updated.

    by:
    Professional Advisory Board
    Canadian Celiac Association
    April 2013

    These guidelines under review by the CCA Professional Advisory Board, June 2014



    Celiac Support Association (CSA)
    http://www.csaceliacs.info/guide_to_oats.jsp

    Considerations about oats

    Oats appear to be suitable for most people with celiac disease and gluten-related disorders, but not all. Medical experts advise waiting until symptoms have resolved before introducing pure, uncontaminated oats (labeled gluten-free). For some, this could mean delaying the introduction of oats for a year or longer. The current medical recommendation for adults with celiac disease or gluten-related disorders is to limit consumption of dry oats to no more than 50 grams per day (50/g day is equivalent to about 1/2c dry oats) and 25 grams per day (25g/day is equivalent to about 1/4 cup dry oats) for children. The CSA Three Step Diet approach to celiac disease and gluten-related disorders can be used as a framework for introducing foods such as pure, uncontaminated oats.

    The FDA’s current proposed definition of gluten-free does not include oats as a prohibited grain. Therefore consumers sensitive to oats or different oat varieties will need to check ingredient labels closely when a final ruling is determined.

    CONTAINS: Avenin, in Oats contains similar amino acid sequences as wheat gluten and can evoke the immune response of celiac disease for some people. Oats storage protein toxicity is not the same in all varieties of oats. Today, there is no way to predict ahead of time, which celiacs will or will not be able to successfully consume oats.



    Gluten-Free Works - Why Oats Should Be Excluded from the Gluten-Free Diet
    by Cleo Libonati, RN, BSN
    https://glutenfreeworks.com/blog/2011/06/20/why-oats-should-be-excluded-from-the-gluten-free-diet/

    CONCLUSION
    Individuals with celiac disease vary in their immune reactions and symptom responses to gluten in wheat, barley, rye and oats. It is clear that oats are not a safe grain for all patients.

    Prudence dictates that oats should be avoided until large-sample, long-term tests on oats are performed, strains of oats that do not elicit immune reactions are discovered, and tests that can accurately determine whether a patient reacts to oats become available.

    On a personal note, my broad experiences with the gluten-free community reveal a sizeable number of individuals with celiac disease who do indeed react to oats in the same way they react to wheat, barley and rye. In speaking to gluten-free support groups, I would estimate at least 10% of people say they react to oats.



    National Foundation for Celiac Awareness
    http://www.celiaccentral.org/Gluten-Free-Food/the-gluten-free-diet/

    What about oats?

    A special caution must also be delivered when it comes to oats. While oats in their natural form do not contain gluten, a small portion of patients with celiac disease react to oats in their pure, uncontaminated form. Some literature suggests that a protein in oats can trigger a similar response to gluten. Additionally, most mills that process oats also manufacture gluten-containing grains, making the chances of cross contamination inevitable.

    The best advice we can offer is to take a great deal of care before introducing oats into your diet, which includes speaking with your healthcare provider about this dietary change. There is no way to determine if you will react, so proceed with caution. Verify that the oats you are using are “pure, uncontaminated,” “gluten-free,” or “certified gluten-free.” Experts recommend that up to 50g of dry gluten-free oats are considered safe. Check nutrition labels for portion size.



    University Chicago Celiac Disease Center

    Do oats contain gluten?

    A large body of scientific evidence accumulated over more than 15 years has proven that oats are completely safe for the vast majority of celiac patients. Oats are not related to gluten-containing grains such as wheat, barley and rye. They don’t contain gluten, but rather proteins called avenins that are non-toxic and tolerated by most celiacs (perhaps less than 1% of celiac patients show a reaction to a large amount of oats in their diets).

    Oats can be in a celiac’s diet provided they are selected from sources that guarantee a lack of contamination by wheat, rye or barley.
    Some who add oats to their diet may experience GI symptoms. This may actually be a result of the increased fiber that oats provide instead of a reaction to the oats themselves.




    GF Processed Foods Links


    Remember: Use published lists wisely. Always read the product ingredient list. If you're unsure, call the manufacturer [even from the store] and ask. GF status checks are generally the #1 type calls customer service reps get.

    Also be conscious of the amount of processed foods you consume. Try to use them sparing or even better, not at all. Many in the GF community feel their best when all processed foods have been removed. Keep in mind, fine tuning your diet is a work in progress; you keep tweaking it so you can be at your best. Making the leap to gluten-free can be a daunting task, GF processed foods could be used as a stepping stone to help make that transition a bit easier. Everyone handles change differently. You need to figure out what works for you, what gives you best chance a success.

    Tip: "When in doubt - leave it out". If you can't verify the status, put it back.

    Tip: When checking the ingredient labels, use the 3-times rule. Read the label when you purchase a product, when you put it away in your pantry and again when you retrieve it to use. This will help minimize mistakes.

    Tip: Stay away from naturally gluten-free foods in bulk bins - cross contamination risks are too high


    Betty Crocker (General Mills)
    http://www.bettycrocker.com/products/glutenfree

    Campbell's GF Products
    www.campbellswithoutgluten.com

    Celiac Disease Foundation's Gluten-Free Resource Directory. This is a massive list of various GF products
    http://glutenfreeresourcedirectory.com/uid/4df6c6a2-2750-4966-a17d-540b30b115c5

    Del Monte Products
    http://www.delmontefoods.com/frequently-asked-questions

    Gluten Intolerance Group's Easy-to-Find and Easy-to-Fix
    http://www.gluten.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/Easy-to-find-11-2013.pdf


    Heinz Products
    http://www.heinz.com/glutenfree/products.html


    Festival Foods Gluten-Free Webpage
    (We have Festival Foods about 20 miles away):
    https://www.festfoods.com/health/special-diets/gluten-free

    Note: Festival Foods Deli is not a dedicated gluten-free environment. However, their staff has participated in the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness GREAT Kitchens Program. A training program to educate food service professionals on gluten-free food preparation and cross contact.


    Popular Gluten-Free Products


    The products I have listed here should be able to be found in any well stocked mainstream grocery store. Some items might be easier found at healthfood stores - often times they have a nice gluten-free section. You can also order from Amazon.com - they've got A LOT of GF foods, but you need to order by case-lots.

    Udi's bread & bagels. This bread is found in the freezer section - http://udisglutenfree.com/

    Mission Corn Torillas Most times I will put sandwich meat in corn tortillas.
    http://www.missionfoods.com/Pantry.aspx

    RP's Gluten-Free Fresh Pasta - http://www.rpspasta.com/gluten-free-pasta/
    Jovial Pasta - http://jovialfoods.com/gluten-free.html
    Schar Pasta - http://www.schar.com/products/us-pasta
    Tinkyada Rice Pasta - http://www.tinkyada.com/

    *Pasta is listed in order of preference.

    Pamela's Pancake & Baking Mix. This makes really good GF pancakes or chocolate chip cookies!
    http://pamelasproducts.com/products/baking-mixes/pamelas-baking-pancake-mix/

    Van's Frozen GF Waffles - Be careful - Van's also have non GF products
    http://www.vansfoods.com/our-products-all-gluten-free#waffles

    Betty Crocker Chocolate Cookie Mix, Brownie Mix - almost any store will carry these. They are found next to the regular gluten-full cake mixes.
    http://www.bettycrocker.com/products/glutenfree

    Udi's premade pizza crusts - Found in freezer case.
    http://udisglutenfree.com/product-category/pizza-crust/

    Kinnikinnick pizza crust - Found in freezer case
    http://consumer.kinnikinnick.com/index.cfm/fuseaction/products.home/productcategoryid/34


    Pizza Toppings (note: these items are what I use, but there are other brands/products): Any favorite veggie. Hormel Pepperoni. Contadina Pizza Sauce (Original, Four Cheese, Pepperoni, or Pizza Squeeze in a bottle). Any brand name shredded cheese. Always remember to read the ingredient labels!

    http://www.gfoverflow.com/results.php?q=brand:+Contadina


    Gluten-Free Candy


    Gluten-Free Candy (updated October 2016)
    https://www.verywell.com/gluten-free-candy-list-562806

    Hershey's Gluten-Free List

    https://www.thehersheycompany.com/brands/special-nutrition.aspx#/Gluten-Free


    Gluten-Free Dining


    Dining out is also a minefield. All too often, restaurants don't understand the intricacies of properly preparing gluten-free food. The risk factor for gluten cross contact is generally quite high. However, with proper training food service professionals can successfully create delicious gluten-free food.

    In many cases, the restaurants that do the best job have a family member that must be gluten-free. They understand the workings of a busy kitchen and educate their staff how to keep their guests [and family members] safe.

    There are many in the gluten-free community that do not eat out at all. They simply won't risk their health for a meal out. This is a personal choice that we all have to make.

    Tip: If you are new to gluten-free, refrain from eating out until have a good handle on the gluten-free diet at home. This minimizes the risk of further gluten exposure and gives your body time to recover.


    Gluten Intolerance Group of North America - Restaurant Dining: 7 Tips for Staying Gluten-Free
    http://www.gluten.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/EDU_RstrntDnngTps_5.28.2014.pdf

    Gluten Intolerance Group of North America - Restaurant Cards (for purchase)
    https://www.gluten.org/product/restaurant-card/

    Gluten Intolerance Group of North America - Quick Reference Ingredient Card (for purchase)
    https://www.gluten.org/product/quick-reference-ingredient-card/

    Triumph Dining - Restaurant Cards

    http://www.triumphdining.com/products/gluten-free-dining-cards

    Living Without - Let's Eat Out: Tips for Safe Gluten-Free Restaurant Dining
    http://bit.ly/1oAtcaf

    ThivingWithCeliac.com - Top 10 Questions to Ask When Dining Out:
    http://thrivingwithceliac.com/top-10-questions-dining-gluten-freephp

    Info about GF apps (many about dining):
    http://www.todaysdietitian.com/newarchives/021313p16.shtml

    http://www.eatright.org/Media/content.aspx?id=6442467101#.UaV0EOB_aqA

    http://celiacdisease.about.com/od/sociallifestyleresources/tp/Gluten-Free-Iphone-Apps-To-Help-You-Shop-Eat-Out.htm

    http://glutenfreepassport.com/allergy-gluten-free-apps/

    Here are some local dining options for you to investigate:
    http://www.gigofecw.org/dining/dining.html



    Local Gluten-Free Bakery


    Happy Bellies Bake Shop (Appleton)
    http://www.happybelliesbakeshop.com/

    Molly's GF Bakery (Pewaukee)
    http://www.mollysglutenfreebakery.com/


    GFDBC Updates


    Revised: 11/27/16
    Add additional GIG of ECW articles and update dead links.

    Revised: 05/24/16
    Add GIG of ECW Newsletter link.

    Revised: 05/21/16
    Add GIG's Easy-to-Find and Easy-to-Fix food ideas.

    Revised: 05/12/16
    Add Books, Magazines & Publications sections

    Revised: 04/30/16

    Revised: 04/06/16

    Revised: 07/24/15
    Added CD Screening info

    Revised: 04/18/15
    Updated links to GIG of North America's new website: www.gluten.org
    Updated Candy Lists
    Updated various links
    Updated Canadian Celiac Association's position on oats

    Revised: 11/11/14
    Updated Processed Foods Section - Added Heinz link

    Revised: 10/19/14
    Updated Processed Foods Section

    Revised: 05/04/14
    Add 10 Must-Do's for Newly Diagnosed to General Info Section

    Revised: 04/12/14
    Add tip about avoiding bulk food bins

    Revised: 03/31/14
    Add links to Candy Section

    Revised: 03/30/14
    Added Oats section
    Added GIG's The Gluten-Free Nutrition Guide - Optimizing the Gluten-Free Diet

    Revised: 03/08/14
    Added links to Gluten-Free Dining

    Revised: 03/05/14
    Fixed: Broken GIG general information links, General Mills GF Product Guide Link, Annalise Roberts recipe links, Campbell's link, Festival Foods Packaged Foods list, Schar Pasta Link, GIG Restaurant Cards link.

    Added: GIG's Easy-to-Find and Easy-to-Fix Link, LiveBetterAmerica.com Recipe Link, Annalise Roberts recipe link, Happy Bellies Bake Shop


    Revised: 08/09/13


    Back to School Resources for Celiac Disease




    A collection of back to school info for those with celiac disease...

    Gluten Intolerance Group of North America - Understanding your Student:
    https://www.gluten.org/community/kids/understanding-your-student/ PDF Version

    Gluten Intolerance Group of North America - School Trip Letter:
    https://www.gluten.org/community/kids/school-trip-letter/ PDF Version

    Gluten Intolerance Group of North America - Letter to Teacher:
    https://www.gluten.org/community/kids/letter-to-teacher/ PDF Version

    Glutenfreeda - So Your Child Has Celiac: First Steps for the Classroom and Beyond: (added 8/21/16)
    http://glutenfreeda.com/so-your-child-has-celiac-first-steps-for-the-classroom-and-beyond/

    Twin Cities ROCK - Navigating School and Daycare with a Gluten Free Diet:

    http://twincitiesrock.org/Schools-Daycare/

    Accommodating Children with Special Dietary Needs in the School Nutrition Programs: 
    http://www.fns.usda.gov/sites/default/files/special_dietary_needs.pdf

    Canadian Celiac Assoc's Teacher Info handout:
    http://www.celiac.ca/pdfs/celiac%20disease%20guide%20for%20teachers.pdf

    Celiac Sprue Association - Getting Along at School:
    http://www.csaceliacs.org/cel_kids_getting_along_at_school.jsp

    Boston Children's Hospital - Raising a Child with CD - Safe at School, School Environment, 504 Plan (download "Celiac Support Group School Packet"):
    http://www.childrenshospital.org/centers-and-services/programs/a-_-e/celiac-disease-program/support-group

    504 Plans for Celiac Disease:
    http://celiacdisease.about.com/od/schoolage/a/504plans.htm

    Celiac Disease Foundation - School and Education Benefits (504 Plan): (added 8/22/15)
    https://celiac.org/celiac-disease/resources/brochures/#cpPTKcpU4uzgBAyh.99

    National Foundation of Celiac Awareness - Navigating the School System:
    http://www.celiaccentral.org/kids/parents/guides/Kids-Youth/Navigating-The-School-System/209/

    National Foundation of Celiac Awareness - Back to School Toolkit: (added 8/5/15)
    http://www.celiaccentral.org/school2015/

    The Kids are Back in School - Tips for Making the (Gluten-Free) Grade by Danna Korn:
    http://www.celiac.com/articles/604/1...orn/Page1.html

    Gluten Free Art Supplies - note this links to a post that is old - please verify products are still GF
    http://surefoodsliving.com/2008/08/gluten-free-art-supplies-for-school/

    Soy-yer Dough (Gluten-free, non toxic and fun scented modeling dough)
    http://www.soy-yer.com/

    The Savvy Celiac - Approaching your School about Gluten-Free Foods (2009)
    http://www.thesavvyceliac.com/2009/07/07/approaching-your-school-about-gluten-free-foods/

    The Savvy Celiac - Managing Gluten-free in the Classroom (2009)
    http://www.thesavvyceliac.com/2009/01/29/gluten-free-in-the-classroom/

    The Savvy Celiac - Must Daycare Provide Gluten-Free Food? (2009)
    http://www.thesavvyceliac.com/2009/03/27/daycare-provide-gluten-free-food/


    Revised:
    08/21/16 - Added Glutenfreea website.
    05/27/16 - Remove American Celiac Disease Foundation links - website gone.
    08/22/15 - Added CDF - School and Education Benefits Link
    08/19/15 - Removed broken link. Updated CSA's Getting Along at School link. Added Soy-yer Dough Link
    08/05/15 - Added NFCA's Back to School Toolkit
    07/29/14 - Added Daycare Rights for your Celiac Children
    05/21/14 - Updated broken links

    Guide to Gluten Cross Contamination


    Separate - Don't Contaminate!

    Basic kitchen safety rules tell us that we need to separate ready-to-eat foods from raw meats, poultry, seafood and eggs - and to use separate cutting boards and utensils to reduce the risk of food poisoning.

    The same rules apply to gluten and gluten-free foods - they must be kept apart!





    The recipes found on our website are made with gluten-free ingredients. The food must also be prepared properly so it remains gluten-free. If you are preparing foods for a gluten-free guest, you must be ever mindful of cross contact.

    This guide will help you to understand and prevent gluten cross contamination.

    Updated: 4/22/17



    Printer Friendly




    The Basics


    Before you start you need to know a few basics.

    What is gluten?

    Gluten is the generic term for the proteins found in grains. The proteins found in wheat, barley, rye and commercial/mainstream oats (think Quaker Oats) are not acceptable for those following a gluten-free diet. Commercial or mainstream oats are highly contaminated with gluten due to how they're grown, harvested, transported and processed. Certified gluten-free oats are acceptable for some celiacs.


    Where is gluten found?

    Just about everywhere! Bread, pizza, cake, cookies, crackers, pasta, cereal, soups, sauces, beer. - just to name a few foods. Many processed foods contain gluten in some form or another. It's very prevalent in the Standard American Diet.


    What does gluten do?

    Gluten provides the structure, the framework – it holds everything together. It provides that chewy texture that is desirable in many foods like bread & pizzas. It also makes a lot of people sick.



    How much?


    Think of gluten as a poison. How much arsenic would you like in your food? Very good, I thought you'd say zero.

    Not only must the food be gluten-free, it must not come in contact with any gluten. The concept of “
    a crumb will hurt you” is hard for people to understand because it involves very small amounts.

    How small? Literally, a very small crumb. A multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized study has shown that many celiacs can safely consume up to 10 milligrams of gluten per day. (10mg = 1/8th of a teaspoon of flour, or 18 slices of gluten-free bread)

    Yes, crumbs matter!

    Here's a perfect illustration. An average grain of rice weighs 28 milligrams. Now, divide that grain into 3 pieces. Those pieces are 9.33 milligram each – just under 10 mg limit.

    Mind blown? There's more...

    Many can not consume even 10 mgs of gluten without getting sick. Many in the gluten-free community strive for and attain ZERO gluten.

    ZERO gluten should be the ultimate goal for everyone following a gluten-free diet.


    Where to find it and what to do about it


    • Condiments (spreadable) – jars of peanut butter, mayo, jelly, butter, margarine, etc. These guys are huge cross-contamination magnets due to Double Dipping!

    • Purchase and use new, fresh products that have not been contaminated.

      Double dipping is strictly prohibited. Master the fine art of “Gob Dropping” or using a couple of spoons & knives to accomplish the task.

      Purchase squeezable containers when possible.


    • Any foods like flours, starches, white or brown sugars, etc. that frequently use shared, unwashed utensils with gluten.


    • Do not use a measuring cup for gluten flour then use the same cup for anything else without a thorough cleaning or use a clean cup too.

      Same goes for stirring or serving. Always use a clean utensil for gluten-free foods.

      Have dedicated utensils for only GF use.

      Please purchase new products that use shared utensils or have been contaminated.


    • Brown sugar has another risk factor. Some people will put a piece of bread in their container. This keeps the sugar soft.


    • Please purchase new products that use shared utensils or have been contaminated.


    • Deep fry oil or pasta water.


    • Do not deep fry gluten-free foods in oil that previously fried gluten-full foods. Use fresh oil, or fry GF foods in fresh oil before frying gluten-full foods.

      Do not boil gluten-free pasta in water that previously boiled gluten-full pasta. Use fresh water for GF pasta.


    • Silverware drawers – take a look in there – lots of crumbs!


    • Clean out the entire drawer and re-wash the utensils. This goes for any other drawers too.


    • Kitchen surfaces with crumbs – whenever preparing gluten-free food, make sure work areas are clean and free of crumbs.


    • Dry wipe the crumbs first with paper towel. Use hot soapy water to wash then rinse with fresh, clean water. Bleach will not do anything to gluten to make it safe.

      It's best to designate a gluten-zero prep area where no gluten is allowed.


    • Toasters - if you’ve ever toasted glutened products in it, there is no way to effectively clean it.


    • Do not use a glutened toaster. Purchase a new one.

      Toaster bags could be used in a pinch. You put your bread in a bag, then inside the toaster

      Toaster Ovens w/Fixed racks - line with foil. Might not work well for actual toasting, but works well for heating.

      Toaster Ovens w/Removable racks - Purchase and mark another rack for GF use. Foil existing rack or clean.


    • Convection Ovens – they circulate the air inside the oven to shorten cooking times.


    • If you cannot bake GF items separately, place GF items on the top rack, above gluten items.

      Either turn off the convection feature (circulated air) or make sure you have tight fitting lid on your gluten-free dish


    • Cake pans – these pans typically have a lot of very deep cuts/grooves in them.


    • Purchase new or use disposable aluminum cake pans.


    • Cookie sheets


    • Line with parchment paper when baking GF cookies.

      Have dedicated GF cookie sheets


    • Any utensil, pot, pan, dish, etc that has come in contact with gluten. They must be clean prior to gluten-free use.


    • Do not re-use these items for gluten-free foods without thoroughly washing them or grabbing a clean one. For example: Don't use the gluten-full pasta salad spoon to serve the gluten-free pasta salad.

      Those living in a mixed house will have dedicated gluten-free utensils, cutting boards, colanders, etc. It helps to have them color coded.


    • Colanders/Strainers/Flour Sifters – Since pastas/gluten often get stuck in the small little holes and slits, cleaning them fully is a nightmare if not impossible.

    • Wooden utensils/boards/rolling pins – Porous item can harbor gluten.

    • Cutting boards [plastic or wood] – due to the deep cuts and grooves, it’s best to get a new one.


    • Purchase new colanders, wooden/porous items & cutting boards.


    • Non-stick pots & pans


    • Replace if there are any cuts or scratches in the surface - do no use it; gluten can get caught. As long as it can be well cleaned, it should not be a problem.


    • Cast iron skillets – the “seasoning” develops from years of use.


    • Replace. Some have heated their old skillets to 600-700 degrees for 30 min to burn off any residue.


    • Ceramic bake or cookware – it's porous.


    • Foil it or purchase new.


    • Dishtowels/sponges/dishrags


    • It helps to use paper towels to do initial clean up, then use clean/unused items to finish cleaning.


    • Grill grates


    • Cleaning them may be a messy job. It might be time to replace the grates.

      If cleaning or replacing isn't an option – grill your GF items on aluminum foil.


    • Shared bowls or bags of your favorite GF snack food. Shared dips & sauces. Each are crumb magnets


    • Snacks must be poured out into an individual bowl before contamination.

      Have a marked & dedicated GF chip dip bowl.


    • Family-Style or Buffet-Style service – A gluten-free nightmare! Inevitably someone will grab the spoon from the pasta salad to dish out the gluten-free coleslaw.


    • If 100% GF buffet-style isn't possible, separate gluten-free foods from gluten foods. Color coded containers & utensils help lessen the contamination risks. Have a "Gluten-Free" sign posted.

      If no room for separate GF/NGF foods, hold back some of the gluten-free foods before they are placed out for service. Tell your GF guests where to find these items.

      Invite if your GF guest to go thru the line first – before any of the GF dishes have a chance of getting contaminated.


    • TV Remotes, Phones, Keyboards, Mice...anything that has been touched by glutened hands.


    • If you have touched gluten - wash your hands before touching anything else.

      Clean these items the best you possibly can - it's tough.



    • More Cross Contamination Information






    Printer Friendly




    Updated:
    04/22/17 - Removed bad link.
    04/29/15 - Added "A Day in the Life: Living in a Mixed House".
    04/22/15 - Updated GIG links and updated Printer Friendly version.
    01/31/15 - Added AllThingsGF.com Cross Contamination page link
    06/21/14 - Add convection oven
    12/27/13 - Fix broken links
    10/20/2013 - Clarify terminology

    Grieving the loss of Gluten

    Grief was the topic for our January meeting. I usually reserve these articles solely for our newsletters that are distributed to group members, however I felt this was important enough to share with everyone.

    If you are struggling with grief and giving up gluten, I hope this of some help.

    Thanks!

    Al - GIG of ECW Branch Manager.


    This article was published in Gluten Intolerance Group of North America's Quarterly Magazine Celebrate Gluten-Free Winter 2013





    “Grief is a state of being that results from the recognition that the world that “should be” is different from the world “that is,” a world that is forever changed by a loss.”

    ~ Dr. Kenneth W. Matheson.


    Dr. Kenneth Matheson's definition paints a very realistic picture for those that are gluten-free. Our entire world is changed forever once we take the plunge.

    I think it's safe to say that every gluten-free person has ridden an emotional roller coaster on their journey to health. People suffer for years [
    6 – 10 years on average]; endure numerous doctor's office visits and usually walk away with more questions than answers. Frustrating to say the least. The result of finally getting answers to the on-going health issues brings an immediate sigh of relief, almost a giddiness. “WHEW, I finally know what's wrong with me!”

    All too quickly that euphoria dissipates. The reality of the situation rears it's ugly head -
    “What am I going eat and how am I going to handle this?” Convenience – gone. Care-free dining – adios. The joy of family gatherings - replaced with dread and worry. Things that took little or no thought - now rivals the logistics of a Mars Rover launch. Buckle up tight, this is could be a bumpy ride.

    Having to go gluten-free means experiencing a massive jumble of emotions. The biggest and probably most complex is grief.

    In 1969, Dr. Elisabeth Kübler-Ross shared her experiences working with over 500 terminally ill patients in her well known book “On Death and Dying”. In this book she describes her
    Kübler-Ross Model [more commonly known as The Five Stages of Grief].

    Even though this framework was initially seen in terminally ill patients dealing with their diagnosises, it has been applied to any type of grief/loss situation – loss of a loved one, a divorce, a job, a limb, a pet, a food, an old lifestyle – any life changing event.


    “Suppressed grief suffocates, it rages within the breast, and is forced to multiply its strength.”

    ~ Ovid


    The grieving process is important and necessary when someone experiences a significant loss. It's normal, it's natural, it's healthy. It's often hard to look beyond the big black wall that stands before you. As daunting as it is, it must be dealt with. Repressing or suppressing grief is detrimental to our well-being resulting in a variety of emotional and physical symptoms (headaches, gastrointestinal problems, heart palpitations). Just as we are working towards a healthy gluten-free body, we must work on a healthy mind/emotional state as well.

    Processing those thoughts, feelings and emotions is intense work, but it helps us to accept what has happened. Grieving forces us to create a “new normal” out of our loss - whatever that new normal may be. We have power to create whatever we wish!

    The grief cycle of
    DenialAngerBargaining - DepressionAcceptance (DABDA) is unique to each individual. Everyone deals with trauma in their own way. These stages are not rigid or sequential in their order. We don't always move through the cycles in the described order, nor do we always experience each and every stage. Transition between the stages can be fluid; subject to the ebb and flow of emotions. Some stages might even be revisited.

    Let's take a closer look at each stage and see how it relates to the loss of our gluten-full lifestyle.

    Denial – A protection mechanism. It helps us to mask the pain of reality while we figure out how to handle the loss.


    “Celiac Disease? Bahhh, that doctor is wrong, just like all the others! His fancy book learnin' and medical tests – it's all bogus.”

    “No, it's not gluten, it's the < insert any food besides gluten >.”

    “I feel fine except for my headaches, depression, and maybe this itchy skin thing, and maybe frequent trips to the bathroom. Heck our entire family is like this – it's normal.”



    Anger – After the denial wears off; reality and pain comes flooding in resulting in anger. This emotion can be directed at anything or anyone, even ourselves. Due to the years of mis-diagnosises, the medical profession often times takes the brunt of the aggression.


    “Why wasn't this caught earlier? Damn doctors!”

    “Gluten is in everything! What am I supposed to eat?”

    “I want my old foods back. I can't have my favorite birthday cake. I can't go out with my friends. This sucks!”

    “Gluten-free food is so expensive and it tastes terrible.”



    Bargaining – The “What If” stage. We start asking questions of ourselves but also a higher spiritual power. We try to seek a compromise in an attempt to regain control of the situation.


    “What if I only have gluten on my birthday? One piece of cake won't hurt”

    “OK – just this one last cheat day...then I'll be good”

    “Please God, I'll do anything – just don't take away my pizza”.



    Depression – The reality of the situation is becoming even more evident. We start feel sadness, regret, fear, uncertainty. We are preparing ourselves for the “aftermath” of the things to come. We are in the early stages of accepting our new reality.


    “My friends won't want to hang out with any more. I'm a social outcast”

    “Everybody else gets to eat anything they want and I can't”

    “My life is over, it will never be the same.”

    “No one understands what I am going through.”



    Acceptance – Not everyone reaches this stage. Some may not even be willing to call it “acceptance”, but a mere “willingness to move forward”. While they may sound similar, there is a difference between truly “owning it” and “just doing what it takes to get by”. When there is full acceptance, there's a sense of calm – a feeling that all will be OK.


    “Well, I'm not happy about this, but I'll do it if I have to.”

    “You know, this isn't bad. I'm finding GF replacements for my old favorites”

    “WOW! I've been GF only two days and I feel so much better.”

    “Gluten-free doesn't have to mean taste-free, crappy food. I can rock this..."



    Embracement – No, this is not one of the original stages, but others feel [myself included] this should be the sixth and final stage for those living a gluten-free lifestyle. With embracement we focus on the positives and benefits that the gluten-free lifestyle offers. We dive in to our new normal head first. We advocate, educate and help others that we come in contact with.


    “Going gluten-free is making me eat healthier than I ever have. I am trying and loving all sorts of new foods. So many naturally GF foods.”

    “People ask me to help them go gluten-free. It's great!”

    “I wanted to help others, so I started a celiac/gluten-free support group in my town.”




    Practical Ways to Cope in the
    Grieving Process

    Dr. Kenneth W. Matheson

    http://ce.byu.edu/cw/fuf/archives/2003/Matheson.Ken.pdf


    • Understand and accept the dynamics and process of grieving by reading/self education or by seeking professional counsel.

    • Be honest with yourself about your situation and your emotions.

    • Be courageous enough to share your feelings.

    • Find a sympathetic, understanding supporter or counselor who can provide feedback and input sorting out hurt, confusion, and feelings and move toward a resolution.

    • Reduce responsibilities and restricting commitments in order to minimize the stress load.

    • Don’t feel guilty about your grieving.

    • Attempt to engage in productive, contributory activities.

    • Endeavor to help to others who are grieving.

    Local support groups have so much to offer when it comes to helping people deal with their new gluten-free life.


    “We must embrace pain and burn it as fuel for our journey"


    ~ Kenji Miyazawa


    My Personal Path

    Just as we all react differently to gluten, we all handle the grieving process in our own way and in our own time. A while back, I was asked how I handled the process of ditching gluten. Looking back, I don't feel I went through all of the stages.

    Denial – I was sick and seeking answers, no denying something had to change.
    Anger – I was upset with the medical profession but realized I had to let that go.
    Bargaining – Nope, I was sick and wanted to feel better and would do anything to do so.
    Depression – Minor, but I attributed it to being sick, not from giving up gluten.
    Acceptance – I was ready to accept anything that made the problem go away.
    Embracement – I'm all about that!

    Below you will find the things the helped me find gluten-freedom. This was my path to a “new normal” without gluten.

    Faith – While it may not be popular to talk about a higher spiritual power, it was an important factor in my own journey. Through-out the entire process, I didn't know why I was going through it, but I knew there was a reason for it. Later I would discover that I was being given a passion and a purpose; what an amazing gift!

    Knowledge - I tend to throw myself into things to learn about it. When I was sick, I turned to the internet searching for answers or clues. I find that the more I know about something, the less afraid I become. The less afraid of it, the better I am at figuring out how to handle it.

    Creativity – Even before I had to give up gluten I liked to cook. For me cooking is a creative process, much like all the other creative processes I enjoy. I guess I like the process of creating, regardless of what or how it is being created. With cooking I was faced with a challenge of using new [and often times unfamiliar] ingredients to create new and exciting foods as well as re-create healthier versions of old favorites. I was determined not to let gluten win this challenge. Creativity to the rescue!

    Support - I was lucky when I stumbled across gluten as a possibility of my problems. I happened upon a discussion board that had a few people that really helped me figure it all out and how to deal with this. I had an online support system.

    Not only did I have an online support system, I was lucky enough to have a very supportive spouse, friends and family. I don't think too many people outside of my wife fully knew what I was going through, how scared I was or how sick I really felt.

    Having a support system to help you through those dark times is a tremendous advantage. They watch out for you and help guide you when you need guidance. Even though I didn't want to socialize with others, my wife was wily enough to convince me to go hang out with our friends or attend family functions. Once I got there, it did boost my spirits and made me feel better. Perhaps my wife couldn't fully understand what I was going thru [like another gluten intolerant might], but she was a sympathetic ear when I needed to vent, a shoulder to lean on when I wasn't sure I was doing the right thing. When I did need another “insider's” perspective, I had the online people in my corner.

    Stepping outside - Throughout the time that I was figuring out my issues, I realized that I was gaining knowledge that could be of use to others. I could take what I was learning and help others. This allowed me to step outside of myself and my own problems.

    I started by contributing to the very same online discussion boards that helped me. There were others just starting out – just as lost, dazed and confused as I was. Starting a local support group took the process to another level. It's an amazing feeling.

    While it may appear that I was ignoring my own emotional state, I feel “doing for others” helped me to understand & process the feelings I was having. I quickly realized that I getting an extreme emotional boost from helping others. I consider this aspect most important for me. I found that my issues/situation was far from what others were experiencing. I found that I was quite lucky in the grand scheme of things. Pretty soon, things were lookin' pretty good in my household.


    “Grief is the process that allows us to let go of that which was and be ready for that which is to come” ~ Therese A Rando



    Final Thoughts

    I don't think anyone likes to experience the pain of a loss. Unfortunately it's a simple fact of life; there is no way to escape it – much like death and taxes. It's just part of the whole “Human Experience”.

    Grief is messy, contradictory and confusing, but it gives us a way to make sense of our world and what we are experiencing. It's a way for us to regain control of our lives; it allows us to let go of our sick and unhealthy past and prepare for a better, healthier version that is waiting to be claimed.

    We will run into obstacles, we may stumble and fall on our journey. No one ever said the path to gluten-freedom was easy. The important thing is that we always, always always get back up and keep moving forward. We are in control and have the keys to unlock the door to our new life.

    Nuova vita! New life!

    Until next time...

    Al Klapperich - Branch Manager


    Other resources used in this article:

    The 5 Stages of Loss and Grief
    By Julie Axelrod

    http://psychcentral.com/lib/2006/the-5-stages-of-loss-and-grief/

    After a Gluten-related Diagnosis: Grieving and Smiling?
    By Ursula Saqui, PhD

    http://www.celiaccentral.org/celiac-disease-in-the-news/after-a-gluten-related-diagnosis-grieving-and-smiling-8785/rev--2/

    Grieving Gluten: The Five Stages of Loss of Gluten Plus a New One
    By gfe's Shirley Braden

    http://glutenfreeeasily.com/five-stages-of-loss-of-gluten-plus-one/

    Finding a New Normal
    By Jan LaPitz

    http://heartachetohealing.com/finding-a-new-normal/

    Life After Loss: Dealing with Grief
    Univ. of Texas at Austin

    http://cmhc.utexas.edu/griefloss.html

    We all grieve in our own way
    By Vaughan Bell

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2012/nov/25/grief-mourning-psychology-customs


    Printer Friendly



    Lack of Support From Family

    Lack of support from family members is something I hear about far too frequently. As disturbing as it is, it's one of the biggest hurdles those of us in the gluten-free community face.

    Sadly, this state of affairs is very common. In some cases, it goes beyond a simple lack of support, it crosses over into deliberate sabotage or willful "poisoning" of food.

    Those that love us the most, can give us the most trouble about our desire to be at our best. This type of behavior is not limited to the gluten free community; it's quite prevalent in many with chronic health issues.

    Fear and Denial and Insanity, oh my!

    Why would someone that loves us not want to support us in anything we do - let alone something that might improve our health and quality of life? I suspect there are hundreds or thousands of different answers, unique as the fingerprints of those providing the answers. One of the most common opinions from GF community is fear.

    Family members are afraid the health problems we are experiencing are closely connected to their own health struggles. If we are correct about the root cause of our troubles, that just might mean they have to go gluten-zero as well. In terms of celiac disease, it's hereditary, no ifs ands or buts. If you have celiac disease there is a
    1 in 22 chance that your immediate family members could have it too, although they may not know it. When it comes to Non Celiac Gluten Sensitivity, gluten knows no family lines; it's just plain bad for everyone. Non Celiac Gluten Sensitivity affects a minimum of 6% of the population. Other medical professionals feel it's closer to 10% and as much as 30%-40%.

    Denial is a very good friend of fear; you see them hanging together - a lot. Many family members are in denial -
    "Oh, I can't possibly have what you have - it's the _____________ ". To be honest, I wasn't any better, I used to blame the grease for my reflux after having a Double Quarter Pounder with Cheese from McD's .

    While most family members would never say it out loud, some would:
    "You're crazy!" or "It's all in your head" or "You're a drama queen and just doing it for attention. Get over it!". For many, it is crazy to think that "The Staff of Life", Wonder Bread and his seductive sidekick SuzyQ would cause problems. True confessions, before I gave up gluten, I would've had those same thoughts, however I would've never verbalized them. I have since become a believer. Depending on how gluten affects you, people many not understand or believe how sick you are. All too often we hear "You don't look sick". Often times gluten affects us neurologically, which may not alter our physical appearance. Depression and cognitive issues are very common reactions to gluten consumption.

    While I don't profess to have all the answers [or any for that matter], I do have some things that might help you cope with misguided, uncaring and selfish family members. Like my Father-In-Law used to say
    "You can pick your friends, you can't pick your relatives".


    1) Be clear about why you are going gluten-free.

    Have a plan, have goals, direction, be specific.
    "I am gluten-free because ____________". If you don't have a clear idea about why you are doing it, how are others supposed to understand? Without direction, it's easy to get lost. It's like going on a car trip without a map or a GPS. If you already have a definitive diagnosis - your goal is clear cut - GLUTEN ZERO FOR LIFE - no exceptions - ever. If your family won't take your word for it, show them your doctor's office notes and lab results.

    Having a medical diagnosis generally adds credibility to your efforts. If you doing dietary trials on your own without a doctor's backing, you're flying without a net. This means you'll need extra resolve to say the course. Strap yourself in, it's going to be a bumpy ride.


    2) Take gluten-free seriously.

    Sometimes, we're our own worst enemy. To be successful at being gluten-zero, you need commitment and consistency. There's no crying in baseball and there is no cheating when it comes to gluten-zero; it's all or nothing. If you don't take it seriously, how can you expect others to take you seriously? Seriously. They get confused and frustrated by your actions. One time you're gluten-zero, the next time you're eating a BigMac. That type of behavior just doesn't play, your credibility goes right down the toilet [pun intended].

    Be aware that your own loved ones may try to sabotage your efforts. They may try to tempt or persuade you back to gluten foods. How many times have you heard
    "Come on, just one bite won't hurt". How many times have they waved your favorite gluten filled food under your nose or even tried to force it into your mouth? Giving in to that type of behavior, only gives them control - and makes you sicker. Stand fast and hold your ground. Eventually they should tire of it because you won't give in.

    If you are doing dietary trials to see if gluten might be causing problems, clearly define how your trial is going to work. I bring up trials because it may involve putting gluten back into your diet - this might confuse your family members. Make sure they know about your plan. If you think you can cover up cheating under the guise of "doing a trial", you won't get away with it too many times.

    Note: Before you start an extensive dietary trial, try to get tested first. In order for the tests to be as accurate as possible, you need to be consuming gluten.
    Click here for more info on testing.

    If you are wondering, a trial should last three to six months at a minimum (six months is better). Depending on your symptoms, it may take a while for them to disappear, particularly neurological or skin [Dermatitis Herpetiformis] symptoms. Sometimes changes are subtle when you remove gluten, but very dramatic when you add it back in. I noticed changes on removal, but noticed larger changes when I went back on gluten. I started a 8 week gluten challenge to get blood work done and called it off after 5 days due to the symptoms. It was enough for me to determine that I will be gluten-zero for the rest of my days. I did have intestinal biopsies taken before I started dietary trials [yes, my testing sequence was reversed], no evidence of tissue damage was found. While I do not have a celiac disease diagnosis, a 4 month trial revealed gluten was an issue for me.


    3) Communicate & Educate.

    As simple as that sounds, I find it's not always done. Sit down with them and explain exactly why you want to explore gluten-freedom (see Tip #1). Be open about what you desire from them, so they know what to expect, they can't read your mind. Ask them for their help and co-operation; ask them to be a part of your team that makes you the best you you can be.

    If we dig deep inside and look beyond the medical necessity of our food requests, we will find an emotional component. Our requests are an extension of ourselves. When our family and friends fail to acknowledge our food requests, we feel it as exclusion and rejection of us as a person. Maybe it is, maybe it isn't. Sometimes it's hard to tell what is inside the hearts and minds of our loved ones.

    Opening up a line of communication is so important when it comes to resolution. Having a calm, heartfelt conversation about our health concerns and what it takes for us to be healthy and happy is the best chance we have at getting them to understand. It is up to us to kindly and respectfully educate them on how to do things correctly, no one else will do it.

    I invite you to read this informative article on Confrontations vs Conversations from PsychCentral:
    http://bit.ly/1GQw2q1 It offers some great insights…

    Confrontations are usually fueled by anger.
    Conversations are fueled by curiosity.

    Confrontations have an aura of a judicial proceeding.
    Conversations frame a problem as something to be solved.

    Confrontations have an element of moral superiority.
    Conversations happen between equals.

    Confrontations shield the confronter from any responsibility.
    Conversations say “we’re in this together.

    If you have trouble expressing yourself verbally, write a letter. Explain to them exactly how you feel, explain what you go thru on a daily basis, how you'd like to get your life back on track and how much it would mean to you to have their support.

    Often times people tend to ridicule or dismiss things that they don't understand. If they are open to learning, find information from a reliable website and share it with them. Try not to overwhelm them with too much information. Once their eyes glaze over, you've lost them.

    You might find something helpful here:
    http://www.gigofecw.org/news/files/educating_about_gluten_free.php
    http://www.gluten.net/resources/educational-bulletins


    4) Letting go

    Let's face it, you might talk and educate until you are blue in the face, there's a possibility they still won't get it. Be confident in the fact that you gave it your best effort. Don't let your emotions consume you over their unwillingness to support you. As hard as it may be, you'll be better off if you just accept it and keep moving forward, focus on getting yourself healthy. Don't let them suck you into their darkness.


    5) If support doesn't come to you, you go to the support

    OK, so maybe your family is a poster-child for dysfunction; incapable of understanding what you're going thru, refusing to work with you on any level...you need to seek out those that understand and have walked in your shoes. Connecting with others that share similar experiences can make the difference between success and failure.

    It's imperative to surround yourself with people who are positive and who are pursuing their own goals. Positivity is contagious - so is loneliness and depression - which would you rather be?
    Dr. Barbara Fredrickson found a Positivity Ratio of 3:1 a tipping point for human flourishing. This means for every negative feeling, thought, experience, we need a minimum of three positive (love, joy, gratitude, etc) in order to be happy. The ideal ratio is 5:1.

    Support comes in many different ways. Today, there is a seemingly endless supply of online communities you can join. The great thing about online communities is that they're always open - ready to accept the latest rant or cheer your most recent accomplishment. If online is not your bailiwick, a local support group is the way to go. While online groups can do wonderful things, nothing beats face-to-face contact. It's hard to replace seeing the look on someone's face, the sound of their voice, and at times, the touch of a hand or hug.

    Search for local support groups here:
    http://www.gigofecw.org/support/supportgroupwebsites/supportgroupwebsites.html


    Good luck in your journey!

    Al


    This article was published in Gluten Intolerance Group of North America's Quarterly Magazine Celebrate Gluten-Free Sping 2013

    Update 03/13/15: Update Tip #2 Communicate & Educate - added Conversations vs Confrontations.
    Update 11/23/12: Fixed typos and added additional information.

    Gluten-Free Cosmetics/Hair Care Products

    When it comes to skin/hair/personal care products, gluten-free or gluten-full is a topic that has been debated for many years and continues yet today. It's an epic battle that rivals "Tastes Great - Less Filling". First, let us explore the science side of this.

    Tastes Great! [Don't worry, it won't hurt you]

    Several celiac experts (Dr. Peter Green - Celiac Disease Center at Columbia Univ., Dr. Stephano Guandalini - Univ. of Chicago Celiac Disease Center, Dr. Alessio Fasano - Univ. of Maryland Center for Celiac Research) say not to worry about gluten in hair/skin care products because the gluten must be consumed in order for it to cause a celiac reaction [villi damage]. Their reasoning, based on scientific evidence - size matters. The gluten proteins are simply too large to be absorbed by your body's largest organ - your skin.

    Did you know - skin makes up about 16% of your body weight?

    Cynthia Kupper, RD, Executive Director of the Gluten Intolerance Group of North America says:

    "While investigating the possible absorption of gluten through the skin, I have talked with many regulatory organizations, and research and development people in the cosmetic industry. They all agree that gluten and all proteins are too large to be absorbed through the skin. Therefore, topical care products that contain gluten do not need to be avoided by persons with CD and DH."


    Source:
    http://www.glutenfreedietitian.com/newsletter/personal-care-products-do-you-need-to-worry-about-gluten/



    According to Dr. Alessio Fasano, Medical Director of the Center for Celiac Research, University of Maryland,

    “If you have celiac disease, then the application of gluten containing products to the skin should not be a problem, unless you have skin lesions that allow gluten to be absorbed systemically in great quantities.


    Source:
    http://www.glutenfreedietitian.com/newsletter/personal-care-products-do-you-need-to-worry-about-gluten/



    Tricia Thompson, RD – The Gluten-Free Dietitian says:

    "The bottom line: There is no scientific evidence that the use of gluten-containing products that are not ingested is harmful to persons with celiac disease. This includes individuals with dermatitis herpetiformis.


    Source:
    http://www.glutenfreedietitian.com/newsletter/personal-care-products-do-you-need-to-worry-about-gluten/


    Doug Schoon, President of Schoon Scientific (scientific consulting for the cosmetics industry) -

    "There is no scientific evidence to support claims that gluten can absorb through the skin. The burden of proof should be on those who make these statements. They should provide credible scientific evidence to back this unlikely claim.


    What makes gluten unlikely to absorb? Substances with molecular weights (sizes) approaching 500 daltons are considered very poor skin penetrators because they are so large. Any bigger, they can’t possibly absorb into the skin, so they just sit on the surface. Gluten is huge — about 600 daltons — which is pretty monstrous; 15% larger than the theoretical maximum size.


    Also, gluten is a protein and so is skin. Protein is attracted to proteins, so gluten is likely to bond tightly to skin making it more difficult to penetrate. So it has two things going against it. This is just another example of an unfounded cosmetic myth used to frighten people. The same holds true for lipstick. There is little scientific study that supports the notion that gluten in lipstick is a problem for people with Celiac disease."


    Source:http://www.nailsmag.com/qa/1124/can-gluten-absorb-through-the-skin


    Update 3/23/16 - add additional information about the size of gliadin and glutenin. Note: Molecular weight = Dalton

    Most gliadin proteins have molecular weights (MW's) of 16,000 to 50,000.

    Glutenin, however, consists of subunits of MW's 20,000 to 100,000 linked through intermolecular disulfide bonds into proteins with MW's of 50,000 to 2,000,000 or more.

    Source: http://naldc.nal.usda.gov/download/31131/PDF




    Less Filling! [Hey that hurts!]

    Even though science/medicine is telling us gluten cannot be absorbed through the skin - and thus not causing a reaction [ie villi damage], it's hard to ignore the countless number of celiacs/gluten sensitives that report they react to gluten in personal-care products. The reactions people experience are varied, many are topical (redness, itchy, burning, blisters] - due to gluten contact. Absorption is not needed for something like
    Contact Dermatitis.

    Could it be that the experts are using intestinal damage as their only gauge for a reaction? It seems they are saying
    “If it doesn't cause intestinal damage, there's nothing to worry about.” Does that sound familiar? It should, because the gluten-free community went through this with Non Celiac Gluten Sensitivity (NCGS), where there is no intestinal damage. For years, experts told those with celiac-like symptoms and no villi damage that gluten was not the problem and NCGS didn't exist. Just because science fails to prove existence, doesn't mean that it fails to exist. Guess what - NCGS is now recognized. It does exist, who knew?

    Could this be another instance where medicine hasn't caught up or it simply hasn't proven what patients have been experiencing? Not all medical professionals hold the status quo however...

    Dr. Rodney Ford, Gastroenterologist & Allergist - Director of
    The Children's Clinic & The Allergy Centre says

    “Do not put food on your skin...Foods are for eating - not for skin care in people with food sensitivity. Although these creams promote that they are “natural”, it is best to put something inert on the skin (such as a fatty cream).”


    Source:
    http://gluten-freeplanet.blogspot.com/2011/02/do-not-put-food-on-your-skin.html



    People's reactions raise several questions:

    Are they celiac reactions?
    Are there other allergies at play?
    Are the reactions
    irritant dermatitis or allergic dermatitis?
    Are they caused by gluten or some other ingredient in the product?
    Science has studied only a handful of the proteins in wheat, could there be other proteins causing problems?

    So many questions, so few answers.

    You have the power

    Regardless of the questions, the science, or the experts – you are in control – you can choose to listen to the science or “listen” to what your body is telling you - and make the appropriate choices. If you continue to have unexplained issues or you if you don't feel comfortable using products with gluten, seek out gluten-free personal care products. You just might be surprised at the results!


    Ingredients

    Stearyldimoniumhydroxyprop-a-what?

    If you thought reading packaged food ingredient labels was difficult, it's child's play compared to the shampoo bottle. You'll need a degree in Molecular Chemistry and a secret decoder ring.

    Cosmetics are not covered under the FDA's Food allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act of 2004 (FALCPA). This means wheat, barley, rye and oats do not have to be clearly or plainly listed – instead, they use complex chemical names. Here are some ingredient lists that should help decipher those labels.

    Something to keep in mind, the ingredient “fragrance”could be from a gluten source. Even unscented products have fragrance that's used to mask the chemical scent. Also fragerances are considered “trade secrets” and their components do not have to disclosed on the label or on the phone.

    I've also included rice, soy, corn, yeast, millet derived ingredients.

    Wheat Derived Ingredients
    Amp-Isostearoyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein Triticum Vulgare (wheat) Germ Oil
    Cocodimonium Hydroxypropyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein Triticum Vulgare (wheat) Gluten
    Disodium Wheatgermamido Peg-2 Sulfosuccinate Triticum Vulgare (wheat) Starch
    Disodium Wheatgermamphodiacetate Wheat Amino Acids
    Hydrolyzed Wheat Gluten & Wheat Flour Wheat Bran Extract
    Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein/PVP Crosspolymer Wheat Germ Extract
    Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein Pg-Propyl Silanetriol Wheat Germ Glycerides
    Hydrolyzed Wheat Starch Wheat Germ Oil
    Hydroxypropyltrimonium Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein Wheat Germamidopropalkonium Chloride
    Laurdimonium Hydroxypropyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein Wheat Germamidopropyl Ethyldimonium Ethosulfate
    Maltodextrin (verify starch source, may not be wheat) Wheat Protein
    Sodium C8-16 Isoalkylsuccinyl Wheat Protein Sulfonate Wheat (triticum Vulgare) Bran Extract
    Stearyldimoniumhydroxypropyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein Yeast Extract (verify source, it may not contain gluten)
    Triticum Vulgare (wheat) Flour Lipids
    Triticum Vulgare (wheat) Germ Extract


    Barley Derived Ingredients
    Amino Peptide Complex Hydrolyzed Malt Extract
    Barley Extract Malt Extract
    Hordeum Vulgare (barley) Extract Phytosphingosine Extract


    Oat Derived Ingredients
    Avena Sativa (Oat) Kernel Flour Hydrolyzed Oat Flour
    Avena Sativa (oat) Kernel Protein Hydrolyzed Oat Protein
    Avena Sativa (Oat) Kernal Extract Oat Beta Glucanoat Extract
    Avena Sativa (Oat) Kernal Oil Oat Flour
    Hydrolyzed Oats Sodium Lauroyl Oat Amino Acids


    Soy Derived Ingredients
    Glycine Soja (soybean)extract Peg-16 Soya Sterol
    Glycine Soja (soybean)flour Peg-25 Soya Sterol
    Glycine Soja (soybean) Oil Soy Phospholipids
    Glycine Soja (soybean) Protein Soy Sterol
    Hydrogenated Lecithin Soybean Extract
    Hydrogenated Soy Glyceride Soybean Oil
    Hydrolyzed Soy Protein Soybean Phospholipids
    Lecithin Soybean Sterol
    Mixed Soy Phospholipids Tocopherol
    Peg-5 Soya Sterol Tocopheryl Acetate
    Peg-10 Soya Sterol Tocopheryl Linoleate


    Rice Derived Ingredients
    Hydrolyzed Rice Extract Oryzanol
    Oryza Sativa (rice) Bran Oil Rice Bran Oil
    Oryza Sativa (rice) Starch Rice Starch


    Yeast Derived Ingredients
    Ceramide 2 Saccharomyces Extract
    Ceramide 3 Saccharomyces Lysate Extract
    Magnesium-Copper-Zinc Glycopeptides Saccharomyces Magnesium Ferment Extract
    Magnesium/Iron/Zinc/Copper/Silicon/
    Glyconucleopeptides
    Saccaromyces/Magnesium Ferment Hydrolysate
    Magnesium-Selenium-Copper-Zinc Glycopeptides Saccaromyces/Potassium Ferment Hydrolysate
    Silicon-Zinc-Copper-Iron-Magnesium Yeast Glycopeptides Saccharomyces Zinc Ferment Extract
    Saccharomyces Calcium Ferment Extract Yeast Extract Yeast Protein
    Saccharomyces/Copper Ferment


    Corn Derived Ingredients
    Aluminum Starch Octenyl Succinate Corn Starch
    Ascorbic Acid Corn Starch Modified
    Ascorbyl Palmitate Corn (zea Mays) Oil
    Caramel Hydrogenated Vegetable Oil
    Corn Flour Sodium Ascorbate
    Corn Oil Zea Mays (corn) Kernel Extract


    Companies with Gluten-Free Products
    Acure Organics Hugo Naturals
    Afterglow Cosmetics - Gluten-Free by Gluten Free Certification Organization (GFCO) Intelligent Nutrients
    Alterna John Masters
    Arbonne Jonathan Product
    BIOMEGA Costco's Kirkland
    DermaOrganic Max Green Alchemy
    Desert Essence Morrocco Method – Vegan/GF
    Dove - Derivatives of gluten will be clearly labeled if present in the product. No Gluten Natural Girl Products
    Ecco Bella Botanique
    Finess Original Sprout
    Garnier Renpure
    Gluten-Free Savonerrie Sei Bella
    Griffin Remedy Suave - Any wheat, barley, rye or oat ingredient will be clearly labeled.
    HBL Surface – Salon quality
    Head Organics Synergy
    Hempz


    Maybelline Gluten Containing Ingredients
    Avena Sativa (Oat) Bran Hydrolyzed Wheat Starch
    Avena Sativa (Oat) Kernel Extract Hydroxypropyltrimonium Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein
    Avena Sativa (Oat) Kernel Flour Laurdimonium Hydroxypropyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein
    Avena Sativa (Oat) Kernel Oil Malt Extract
    Cocodimonium Hydroxypropyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein Maltodextrin
    Cyclodextrin Secale Cereale (Rye) Seed Flour
    Dextrin Sodium C8-16 Isoalkylsuccinyl Wheat Protein Sulfonate
    Dextrin Palmitate Sodium Lauroyl Oat Amino Acid
    Disodium Wheat Germamphodiacetate Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Germ Extract
    Hordeum Vulgare Extract Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Germ Oil
    Hydrolyzed Malt Extract Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Gluten
    Hydrolyzed Oat Flour Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Starch
    Hydrolyzed Oat Protein Wheat Amino Acids
    Hydrolyzed Oats Wheat Germ Glycerides
    Hydrolyzed Wheat Flour Wheat Germamidopropalkonium Chloride
    Hydrolyzed Wheat Gluten Wheat Protein
    Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein Wheatgermamidopropyl Ethyldimonium Ethosulfate
    Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein / PVP Crosspolymer Yeast Extract


    Maybelline states they do not maintain a gluten-free list. Consumers need to read the ingredient lists of their products in order to determine the status.


    Sources used in this post:
    http://www.weareglutenfree.com/gluten-free-shampoo-and-conditioner/

    http://www.delightglutenfree.com/feeling-beautifulwithout-gluten

    http://www.theceliacdiva.com/gluten-free-shampoo-conditioner/

    ~~~oOo~~~

    Gluten in Cosmetics: Results of Testing on Lipsticks and Lotions

    lipstick
    Inadvertent gluten ingestion from skin care products is a concern for those maintaining a gluten-zero lifestyle.

    Two potential sources of ingestion are lotions and lipsticks. Tricia Thompson, MS, RD from Gluten-Free Watchdog and Thomas Grace decided to do gluten testing on two lotions and four lipsticks that contained gluten derived ingredients. This was a very small test, but I think the results will surprise you.

    Sandwich and Competitive R5 ELISA test results on all six products returned less than 5 ppm and less than 10 ppm respectively. This means the products tested below detectable limits for each type of test.

    To see the full results and get the authors' comments:
    http://www.glutenfreedietitian.com/newsletter/2012/09/03/gluten-in-cosmetics-results-of-testing-on-lipsticks-and-lotions/



    Updated:

    03/23/16
    01/30/15
    03/10/13

    Fox Valley GF Friendly Restaurants

    Notes from FVC meeting - GF Friendly Restaurants

    Peg and I attended the March meeting of the
    Fox Valley Celiac Support Group. This meeting had representatives from 7 different area restaurants explaining their GF menu options and how they provide those options.

    We also got to meet Andi and her husband from Manitowoc County Celiac Support Group. She's the one that tipped me off to this meeting! Thanks Andi and thanks FVCSG!

    Restaurants represented:

    Chef Michael Short - Cafe Bon Appétit (Lawrence University)
    Nicole - Happy Joes
    Joe Zehren - The Bar
    Dona & Mary (baker) - Plum Hill
    Shirley - Sangria's Mexican Grill
    Doris - GingeRootz Asian Grille
    Corporate Chef Foster Deadman - Supple Group (Fratello's, Melting Pot, Red & White, Dockside, etc..)


    Cafe' Bon Appetit (Lawrence University Andrew Commons)


    Chef Michael Short

    Bon Appetit is a national food service management company.

    They don't advertise it, but this cafe is open to the public.

    Scratch cooking

    "Made without Gluten" logo - Focus on naturally GF foods.

    Have GF pasta, bread, buns, cookies, brownies, etc available for students

    Take pride in training their staff. Servers get hours of training each semester.

    Their catering dept has much more control over their foods. They've done GF weddings, luncheons, meetings, etc.


    Lawrence University
    Cafe' Bon Appetit - Andrew Commons
    711 East Boldt Way Appleton, Wisconsin 54911
    (920) 832-7000
    http://www.cafebonappetit.com/menu/your-cafe/lawrence



    Supple Group (Fratello's, Melting Pot, Red & White, Dockside, etc..)


    Corporate Chef Foster Deadman

    GF diners are not a burden!

    Very well trained staff.

    Fratello's everything scratched made - will modify dishes to make it GF.

    Even Golden Corral is scratch made, however there is a higher CC issue due to the buffet style. GC is the riskiest place due to the customer contact with the food.

    I was very impressed with Chef Foster's presentation.

    Note: Melting Pot is a member of GIG's
    Gluten Free Restaurant Awareness Program

    Fratello's Appleton Menu
    Fratello's Oshkosh Menu
    Melting Pot - Appleton GF Menu


    The Supple Group of Restaurants
    http://supplerestaurantgroup.com/



    Plum Hill Cafe


    Dona Nie, Manager
    Mary Pahl, Baker

    My apologies, my notes are sparse on Plum Hill as I was speaking to Chef Foster.

    All soup bases will now be GF.

    Any sandwich can be made GF

    Mondays are GF bake days - Separate prep area for GF Baking

    Oats = Bob's Red Mill certified oats.

    Designated cutting boards, knives, utensils - all color coded.


    Plum Hill Cafe
    313 Dodge Street
    Kaukauna, Wi 54130
    Telephone: 920.766.9090
    http://www.plumhillcafe.com/



    Ginger Rootz


    Doris, Owner

    Fell in to the GF options. Had lots of requests for GF. 2007 started a GF menu.

    Changed menu around just for GF

    Tell the staff if you are celiac/have allergy so the entire process is GF [properly address CC issues]. They are seeing customers eating GF for various reasons. Some are celiacs, some want to remove gluten because they feel better without, some want to eat healthier.

    Have separate GF woks

    An allergen order is clipped so staff knows this order must be handled differently. The remains in place thru the entire process.

    Looking into getting special plates for GF food so it easy to recognize.

    Trying to convert entire kitchen to GF, but they are running in to taste differences between NGF and GF dishes. They are trying to maintain the same taste and quality.

    Will do customer orders even if menu item is not marked as GF.

    #1 staff training is for GF.

    5 - 10% of weekly guests are GF.


    GingeRootz
    2920 N Ballard Road
    Appleton, WI 54912
    (920) 738-9688
    http://www.gingerootz.com/



    Happy Joe's Pizza


    Nicole, Manager

    2 teammates have CD.

    Only have small GF pizzas

    Separate utensils,etc for GF - color coded

    Separate prep area for GF pizza

    Dedicated oven for GF pizza (3rd oven is GF)

    Crust is frozen and made off site

    All toppings are GF except meatballs

    All dressings are on salad bar are GF (
    as with all buffet-style layouts, must be mindful of cross contamination)

    Standardized training nationwide


    Happy Joe's Pizza
    3401 East Evergreen Dr
    Appleton, WI 54913
    920-954-6000
    http://www.happyjoes.com/stores.php?action=ViewStore&storeid=81



    The Bar


    Joe Zehren, Owner

    Joe's niece has CD. His sister was telling him how hard is was to eat out. They educated themselves on cross contamination issues, ingredients, etc. Also worked with Festival Foods. [
    they have knowledgable RDs on staff].

    Dedicated friers

    Color coded kitchen

    Pizza toppings are taken from "clean" stock [not from the line]

    Udi's buns and bread. They have special MONSTER sized loaves of bread! 2x - 3x larger than consumer bread!! They will sell buns, bread and pizza crusts. A loaf of bread is 10.72 - not really a bad deal considering. Pizza crusts are 2.25 - 2.50. Just call and ask for the kitchen manager.

    The Bar's Menu


    The Bar
    Appleton - The Avenue • Appleton - Lynndale
    Green Bay - Lime Kiln • Green Bay - Holmgren Way
    Oshkosh • Wausau
    http://meetatthebar.com/



    Sangria's


    Shirley

    Lots of options - over 600 different combinations

    Have laminated GF menus

    Staff is trained

    Kitchen shuts down for special tickets - pull clean pans, special grill, dedicated fryer,

    Chips & Salsa, Bean Dip are all GF

    Sauces are GF

    Soups are GF - home made

    Burritos, tacos & enchiladas can be made GF

    Fajitas are popular item

    Have GF desserts


    Sangria's Mexican Grill
    700 North Koeller Street Oshkosh, WI 54902
    (920) 230-6818
    http://www.sangriasmexicangrill.com/index.html




    For more area GF dining options checkout our
    Dining Page.

    Educating family & friends about gluten-free

    Holidays and special family events are supposed to be filled with fun, laughter and lightheartedness. For those of us with dietary requirements, often times it met with dread and fear - with good reason.

    Easter is only one week away. In many families, this means Easter Dinner at someone's house other than your own. Oh the humanity...

    ~~

    Not only was today Palm Sunday, but it was also First Communion in our church. The kitchen and fellowship hall was a-buzz with activity.

    A family was holding their First Communion celebration in the fellowship hall and everyone was bringing their contributions to the feast: deviled eggs, sliced ham, calico beans, sloppy joes, cakes, pies and desserts of all types. OH MY!

    As I was watching all of this food pour in, I'm thinking...OMG what a gluten-free nightmare...

    Peg and I were in the kitchen cleaning up from communion, we were invited to take part in celebratory feast. A family member knows I am gluten-free and said "Oh gosh, I'm sorry, we don't have any gluten-free buns, but there's plenty of other things for you...". We politely declined, but really appreciated the heartfelt invitation.

    Dining out in a restaurant is hard, but I think eating at someone's house or a hosted event is even harder. Most times the host/hostess are unfamiliar with the gluten-free diet and the concept of cross contamination. Even professionally trained chefs may not always know the ins-and-outs of a gluten-free diet.

    It's all about education.

    I don't blame friends, family and loved ones for not knowing about gluten-free. In fact, it's our [the gluten-free community] responsibility to impart that knowledge to them. If we don't do the education, who will?

    In the end, if the people in our lives do not know how to accommodate our needs, we have no one else to blame but ourselves - to a certain degree.

    Of course there are some people that just don't get it no matter how hard we try. If we've done our best to educate and it is just not sticking - at least we gave it our best shot. Sometimes family can be the hardest to get through to.

    The whole education process doesn't happen overnight. Of course, we have to make allowances [bring our own food, eat before hand, etc] until we are comfortable in their knowledge and abilities. Sadly, in some cases, that day may never come, despite our best efforts.

    Since 2003, I've had a lot of "educational opportunities" with our friends and family. They now know and understand cross contamination, they will verify products/ingredients with me, even save the labels for me to inspect. My family and friends have been very good about learning and making things safe for me. I connect with enough of the gluten-free community to know their behavior is not the norm. I am lucky...or...have I simply done a good job at educating them. I suspect it's a little of both.

    Even though my family and friends are very good, I
    always bring at least one dish that I know is safe. Often times, I'll bring a second dish of the same food just for me that won't be put out for the masses. Also, we try to host as many family events as we can so we have as much control as possible.

    I'd like to share some of the tools I've used to educate my friends and family members....

    BeyondCeliac.org: Seriously, Celiac Disease - This is an effort to educate non-diagnosed family members about the importance of getting tested. As we’ve [often] discussed, our own families can be the most difficult. We talk, we educate, we lead by example. Whatever we do, has no affect. They just don’t listen to us. Celiac disease is genetic, it runs in families. If one person in the family has it, there is a chance someone else in the family has it too (1 in 22 for a mother/father/sibling) - they may not even know it. It’s very possible they could have it, and not have any symptoms at all! Be aware a single negative test does not clear a person for life. Celiac Disease can be triggered at any age - at any time. And so the struggle begins… Family members need to be tested, but getting them to do it is another story. This is where Seriously, Celiac Disease campaign comes in.

    Living Gluten Free for Dummies by Danna Korn - I highly recommend this book. I see this book as a continuation or update of her Wheat free Worry Free book. It also goes a bit further in depth on certain subjects. There is no need to own both. Get this one if you don't have either book. Again, a great book to loan out.

    Wheat Free Worry Free by Danna Korn - I got this book shortly after I went GF. Danna has a great persona in her books. Her style is very conversational, easy to read and fun! She includes humor in her books, which I think is a great idea. This is a great book to give to friends and loved ones. Often times they have a hard time understanding what you're going thru and why you have to do it. I lent this to my Mom, after that, she seemed to "get it"...or at least stopped questioning why I couldn't have ___________ ;).

    A Celiac is Coming For Dinner - This is a nice article from Caryn Taity about accommodating gluten-free guests. I have given this article to several family and friends.

    Cooking for Gluten-Free Family or Friends - Amy Leger [aka The Savvy Celiac], covers some of the basics.

    Gluten-Free Diet Boot Camp - I often get asked for information on celiac disease and gluten-free. Either it's someone that is just starting to investigate gluten as the source of their health issues, or it's someone that is just newly diagnosed and looking how/where to start. This is a collection of many different links.

    A Guide to Gluten Cross Contamination - This guide strictly addresses areas of gluten cross contamination and how to minimize the risk.

    A Day in the Life - Living in a Mixed House - This is an article I had written several years ago for this support group. It explains how we handle having gluten in the house. This is knowledge and experience I have gained over the years - much of it I've imparted to friends and family members.

    So, You Want to Bake Gluten-Free Cookies - I created this for a few non-gluten-free people that wanted to bake GF cookies. We put together a GF Cookie Baking Kit: This document that included the recipes, the proper amount of GF flour for a specific amount of cookies. I cover the basics of gluten, gluten-free baking and cross contamination - enough information so they can safely make GF cookies for someone. Note: You can tell by the logo, this was done before we became a Gluten Intolerance Group branch in May 2011

    Celiac Disease - Stuff you should know, but didn't know to ask - A presentation I did for our church. Since our Pastor is also gluten-free I wanted to educate the other members. This presentation covers the history of celiac disease, what it is, what is gluten, is there a safe amount of gluten, cross contamination. Our church now has a completely gluten-free communion. Since the host is gluten-free so there is no chance of cross contamination. Note: You can tell by the logo, this was done before we became a Gluten Intolerance Group branch in May 2011




    Updated:
    12/16/16 - Added BeyondCeliac.org's Seriously, Celiac Disease
    10/29/13 - Added Gluten-Free Diet Camp.
    6/24/2013 - Added Guide to Gluten Cross Contamination.

    How many celiacs in Wisconsin?

    I came across a Google Search looking for the number of celiacs in Wisconsin.

    Now there could be a few variations of this question:

    How many diagnosed celiacs?
    How many potential celiacs?

    Since I don't have time to research "How many diagnosed celiacs", I'm going to answer "How many potential celiacs?". Since we know the general prevalence of celiac, we can calculate an estimate.


    First we start with population of Wisconsin

    According to the
    2010 US Census Bureau, Wisconsin has a population of 5,686,986.


    Next we need the prevalence of celiac disease

    A
    2003 ground breaking medical study conducted by Dr. Fasano determined that ...

    1 in 133 of normal, healthy people have Celiac Disease [most do not know it].
    1 in 56 of those that have related symptoms.
    1 in 39 of those that have a 2nd degree relative [aunt or cousin] with Celiac Disease.
    1 in 22 in those that have a 1st degree relative [parent or sibling] with Celiac Disease.

    Celiac Disease affects about
    1% (3 million) of the population in the USA.


    Time to fire up the calculator

    If we apply the 1 in 133 - we get an estimate of 42,759 people
    If we apply the 1% -
    we get an estimate of 56,869 people that potentially could have CD

    We can estimate the number of diagnosed. According to Dr. Peter Green
    only about 10% of the 1% are actually diagnosed.

    If we apply 10% to the 1% -
    we get an estimate of 5,686 diagnosed celiacs in Wisconsin.

    A bit more math reveals this:
    approximately 51,183 people are currently undiagnosed.


    Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity aka The Gluten Syndrome

    Would you like to see an even larger number? It estimated that Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity affects anywhere from
    6% to 40% of the population.

    6% of 5,686,986 =
    341,219 people that gluten affects adversely.
    40% of 5,686,986 =
    2,274,794 people that gluten affects adversely

    That's a lot of people! Now, let's calculate the healthcare dollars chewed up because of gluten. Ooops, I don't have a calculator big enough for that task! "Hello NASA? Yeah, this is Al from GIG of ECW..."

    If you'd like to calculate the numbers of your home town, check out our
    Celiac Disease/Non Celiac Gluten Sensitivity Calculator.

    Would you like to see these numbers broken down by county? Here ya go...
    ,
    Wisconsin Counties
    Estimated number of people with Celiac & NCGS
    County 2010 Census

    Population
    Est. # of Celiacs

    1%
    Est. # of DX Celiacs

    10% of 1%
    NCGS

    6%
    NCGS

    10%
    NCGS

    40%
    Adams 20,875 209 21 1,253 2,088 8,350
    Ashland 16,157 162 16 969 1,616 6,463
    Barron 45,870 459 46 2,752 4,587 18,348
    Bayfield 15,014 150 15 901 1,501 6,006
    Brown 248,007 2,480 248 14,880 24,801 99,203
    Buffalo 13,587 136 14 815 1,359 5,435
    Burnett 15,457 155 15 927 1,546 6,183
    Calumet 48,971 490 49 2,938 4,897 19,588
    Chippewa 62,415 624 62 3,745 6,242 24,966
    Clark 34,690 347 35 2,081 3,469 13,876
    Columbia 56,833 568 57 3,410 5,683 22,733
    Crawford 16,644 166 17 999 1,664 6,658
    Dane 488,073 4,881 488 29,284 48,807 195,229
    Dodge 88,759 888 89 5,326 8,876 35,504
    Door 27,785 278 28 1,667 2,779 11,114
    Douglas 44,159 442 44 2,650 4,416 17,664
    Dunn 43,857 439 44 2,631 4,386 17,543
    Eau Claire 98,736 987 99 5,924 9,874 39,494
    Florence 4,423 44 4 265 442 1,769
    Fond du Lac 101,633 1,016 102 6,098 10,163 40,653
    County 2010 Census

    Population
    Est. # of Celiacs

    1%
    Est. # of DX Celiacs

    10% of 1%
    NCGS

    6%
    NCGS

    10%
    NCGS

    40%
    Forest 9,304 93 9 558 930 3,722
    Grant 51,208 512 51 3,072 5,121 20,483
    Green 36,842 368 37 2,211 3,684 14,737
    Green Lake 19,051 191 19 1,143 1,905 7,620
    Iowa 23,687 237 24 1,421 2,369 9,475
    Iron 5,916 59 6 355 592 2,366
    Jackson 20,449 204 20 1,227 2,045 8,180
    Jefferson 83,686 837 84 5,021 8,369 33,474
    Juneau 26,664 267 27 1,600 2,666 10,666
    Kenosha 166,426 1,664 166 9,986 16,643 66,570
    Kewaunee 20,574 206 21 1,234 2,057 8,230
    La Crosse 114,638 1,146 115 6,878 11,464 45,855
    Lafayette 16,836 168 17 1,010 1,684 6,734
    Langlade 19,977 200 20 1,199 1,998 7,991
    Lincoln 28,743 287 29 1,725 2,874 11,497
    Manitowoc 81,442 814 81 4,887 8,144 32,577
    Marathon 134,063 1,341 134 8,044 13,406 53,625
    Marinette 41,749 417 42 2,505 4,175 16,700
    Marquette 15,404 154 15 924 1,540 6,162
    Menominee 4,232 42 4 254 423 1,693
    County 2010 Census

    Population
    Est. # of Celiacs

    1%
    Est. # of DX Celiacs

    10% of 1%
    NCGS

    6%
    NCGS

    10%
    NCGS

    40%
    Milwaukee 947,735 9,477 948 56,864 94,774 379,094
    Monroe 44,673 447 45 2,680 4,467 17,869
    Oconto 37,660 377 38 2,260 3,766 15,064
    Oneida 35,998 360 36 2,160 3,600 14,399
    Outagamie 176,695 1,767 177 10,602 17,670 70,678
    Ozaukee 86,395 864 86 5,184 8,640 34,558
    Pepin 7,469 75 7 448 747 2,988
    Pierce 41,019 410 41 2,461 4,102 16,408
    Polk 44,205 442 44 2,652 4,421 17,682
    Portage 70,019 700 70 4,201 7,002 28,008
    Price 14,159 142 14 850 1,416 5,664
    Racine 195,408 1,954 195 11,724 19,541 78,163
    Richland 18,021 180 18 1,081 1,802 7,208
    Rock 160,331 1,603 160 9,620 16,033 64,132
    Rusk 14,755 148 15 885 1,476 5,902
    St. Croix 84,345 843 84 5,061 8,435 33,738
    Sauk 61,976 620 62 3,719 6,198 24,790
    Sawyer 16,557 166 17 993 1,656 6,623
    Shawano 41,949 419 42 2,517 4,195 16,780
    Sheboygan 115,507 1,155 116 6,930 11,551 46,203
    County 2010 Census

    Population
    Est. # of Celiacs

    1%
    Est. # of DX Celiacs

    10% of 1%
    NCGS

    6%
    NCGS

    10%
    NCGS

    40%
    Taylor 20,689 207 21 1,241 2,069 8,276
    Trempealeau 28,816 288 29 1,729 2,882 11,526
    Vernon 29,773 298 30 1,786 2,977 11,909
    Vilas 21,430 214 21 1,286 2,143 8,572
    Walworth 102,228 1,022 102 6,134 10,223 40,891
    Washburn 15,911 159 16 955 1,591 6,364
    Washington 131,887 1,319 132 7,913 13,189 52,755
    Waukesha 389,891 3,899 390 23,393 38,989 155,956
    Waupaca 52,410 524 52 3,145 5,241 20,964
    Waushara 24,496 245 24 1,470 2,450 9,798
    Winnebago 166,994 1,670 167 10,020 16,699 66,798
    Wood 74,749 747 75 4,485 7,475 29,900
    Totals 5,686,986 56,870 5,687 341,219 568,699 2,274,794



    A Day in the Life: Living in a Mixed House



    Printer Friendly


    This article was originally written and presented to the members of this support group in March 2009. I decided to correct some typographic errors and add some additional knowledge/information I didn't have when I originally wrote it.

    This document draws upon my knowledge and experience I have acquired since going gluten-free in 2003. I have given you, the reader, a glimpse into how I personally carry out a gluten-free diet in a mixed house. I am not suggesting this is the only way or the best way; it's simply my way. Nothing more – nothing less. Please do not take any information found here as medical or professional advice. I'm not a doctor/nutritionist/dietitian, nor do I play one on TV. Before making any changes, discuss them with your healthcare team to make sure they are right for you.

    My only intent is help others that may be struggling with the gluten-free lifestyle.

    Alan Klapperich
    GIG of East Central WI - Branch Manager

    Updated 6/24/2014





    Not only do we have to be concerned about gluten ingredients that make up our food – we also have to be concerned about any gluten that may come into contact with our gluten free food.

    Often times those that are new to the diet [or our friends and loved ones that don’t yet understand the diet], don’t fully understand the lengths we have to go thru to make sure our food isn’t contaminated. Yes, eye rolls and sighs are often the reactions we get. They think we’re being over cautious, anal retentive, drama queens…running around like Lucy van Pelt in A Charlie Brown Christmas “Ugh! I've been kissed by a dog! I have dog germs! Get hot water! Get some disinfectant! Get some Iodine!”

    Gluten is gluten – it doesn’t matter how we come in contact with it. We need to be mindful of it.

    GF or NGF [Non-Gluten-Free] Household – That is the question

    Choosing what type of house to have depends on many factors. Economic, young children, percentage of members that require GF – just to name a few. I’m not going to defend or promote one way or the other. Every one must make the choice that fits them best. There’s no question that having a totally GF house would make things a lot easier on those that need to be GF. You have to weigh the practicalities of each side very carefully. However, as we continue down this gluten-free path, our house contains an ever dwindling supply of gluten. If we had kids, we might have chosen to be a 100% GF house right away.

    Obviously those people that have a GF household are going to have an easier time of this. I’d venture to guess that, most people have a mixed house. I suspect that most celiac homes are mixed [meaning those that must be GF are, those that aren’t GF have gluten foods in the house]. I took a poll on one of the discussion boards I administrate. 77% (24) live in mixed houses.

    I will say this – if you are having trouble getting your numbers down on your annual follow up blood work or still don’t feel well – you’d need to examine what is going on. How is gluten getting in? Are your food choices correct? Are you eating processed/packaged foods? Are you dining out? Could it be cross contamination at home? Did you check your meds/supplements? A number of things must be considered.

    Those of us with a mixed house have our work cut out for us. We must always be on guard and always observant. Some people see this as a negative, because they don’t have a safe harbor from the rest of the gluten polluted world – that is completely understandable and desirable in certain circumstances. In my case, I don’t view it as a hardship, I view it as one of those “facts of life”. I feel it prepares me to deal with the rest of the world that doesn’t cater to me and my needs. Once you figure out a system, sharing a kitchen/pantry is do able – it just takes some planning – just like everything else with the GF lifestyle. “He who fails to plan, plans to fail”.

    A very key element in having a mixed kitchen or 100% GF house – is having total buy-in of rule following from the others that live in the house. You’re really at their mercy in this. Sometimes this is not always easy – particularly with uncooperative spouses/significant others, kids [young ones] or yes, slobs. I’ve always said, it’s a good thing that I’m the one that’s GF, and not Peg. Yeah, truth be told, I can be teeny-tiny bit of a slob. In my defense, [I think Peg will back me up] when it comes to keeping the kitchen clean of food droppings, I think I do a pretty good job. I do my best to follow all the cross contamination rules just as she does. The kids – well – kids will be kids. As good as they can be, there’s going to be some mistakes made. The older kids, it might be easier to teach them what they need to do to keep things safe for their GF family member.

    Regardless if you’re a mixed house or a 100% GF house, it’s always a good idea to give the kitchen/pantry a thorough cleaning when first starting out. Pull everything out of the fridge, cupboards, cabinets and drawers. Wash things down with warm soapy water – changing the water frequently. Gluten is not a living thing, so you can’t kill it – bleach does nothing. Heck as long as you’re at it, pull out the stove and fridge too - they can get pretty funky! For those with a mixed house – you’ll have to do this regularly if you don’t already do it.

    Organization

    As long as you have all the stuff pulled out of the cupboards and shelves, you will want to look at reorganizing them. You’ll want to have designated shelves, drawers and cupboards strictly for GF foods and for NGF foods. It’s best to keep the NGF items away from the GF items. It can also help to get some sealable containers so that you can place the GF food inside them – that way you won’t have to worry if something gets spilled or dropped on it. If you happen to have NGF flours – putting them in their own sealable container is also advisable. If you share pantry space, put GF items ABOVE gluten items. Since gluten rolls downhill, we don’t have to worry about “stuff” falling into it our GF foods. Also, make sure you clearly label GF and or NGF containers as such.

    Also try to designate some counter or prep space strictly for GF items. Try to make a GF zone so that you always know you have a clean space to put things down. This can help a great deal when prepping meals.

    Hardware

    There are some utensils that you’ll want to replace – hands down, no matter what.

    Toasters - if you’ve ever toasted glutened products in it – get yourself a new one and mark it so everyone knows that only GF items are to be put in it.

    Toaster Ovens – if you’ve got one with removable racks, call the manufacturer and see if you can purchase another rack for it. We purchased a Kitchen Aid, as soon as I got home I called them and asked about another rack. The representative seemed somewhat perplexed as to why I wanted another rack. I explained – he sent me another one free of charge! Now that’s customer service!

    Colanders/Strainers/Flour Sifters – Since pastas/gluten often get stuck in the small little holes and slits, cleaning them fully is a nightmare if not impossible. We have 2 colanders.

    Wooden utensils/boards/rolling pins – Porous item can harbor gluten.

    Cutting boards [plastic or wood] – due to the deep cuts and grooves, it’s best to get a new one.

    Cake pans – these pans typically have a lot of very deep cuts/grooves in them. Cookie sheets – you could always use parchment paper with your existing pans when baking GF cookies. I have my own cake pan, muffin tins, pizza pan, mini loaf pans, cookie sheets.

    Non-stick pots & pans – if there’s any cuts or scratches in the surface, replace it. It’s reported that Teflon is a porous surface and thus is not GF friendly. I have relaxed my views on non stick surfaces over time. As long as the coating does not have any cuts/scrapes/grooves – and as long as it’s completely clean – it's not a problem. I sent off an email to Tricia Thompson aka The Gluten Free Dietitian aka the author of The GF Nutrition Guide. Since she’s done many scientific studies, I thought she’d be a good one to ask about Teflon. Here’s what she said:

    "In my opinion, if a teflon pan has scratched and starts to peel it should be thrown away for reasons far more important (probably) than the possibility it harbors gluten. Maybe it's just me but I don't like the idea of eating those little bits of teflon even if they are chemically inert!!


     As for the possibility that nonstick pans absorb gluten, I am not aware of any studies but find this hard to imagine. I am not an expert on Teflon but based on what I've read, Teflon is chemically inert, is not porous, and does not absorb food. "


    ~ Tricia Thompson, RD


    There are only 1 or 2 pans that we use for gluten foods – I use them if I have to [which is rare].

    Cast iron skillets – the “seasoning” develops from years of use is definitely something to stay away from. I’ve heard of some people getting them sandblasted or scrubbing them with steel wool and starting over.

    Ceramic bake or cookware – yeah, that old pizza stone ain’t gonna cut it. Foil it, or hand it down to the gluten eaters.

    Having some type of marking scheme is important. People have to know what’s used for GF and fair game for anything else. In our house we use the color red as much as possible for GF items. Spatulas, spoons, Tupperware, etc – all have the color red somewhere. We do have a GF wooden spatula – it’s Pampered Chef Brand – it’s the only one of it’s kind. For our toaster oven rack, I’ve colored all 4 corners red with a Sharpie permanent marker.

    We have even trained frequent guests and family members on how our house functions and cross-contamination concerns.


    Navigating

    Figuring out how to navigate in this gluten filled world takes some doing. It requires a GPS – Gluten Position Service. Figuring out how to do it in your own kitchen is no exception.

    Areas of concern

    I’ve already discussed the utensils.

    Counters – crumbs from making a NGF sandwich can be scattered and left behind. This is why it helps to have designated areas for GF and NGF. It just makes things a bit easier.

    Dishtowels/sponges/dishrags – it helps to use paper towels because they’re disposable. If Peg is working with NGF products, she’ll clean first with paper towels then use a dishrag. After cleaning up she will switch out the dishrags with fresh ones. An average day in our house does not really generate much gluten usage.

    Pets & Pet food – this is an easy one to overlook. If you’re feeding Rover NGF dog food, you might consider switching to a GF dog food [yes, pets do benefit from GF diets too!], or be very careful to wash your hands after feeding them. I have a friend that saw her testing numbers get worse – she finally pinned it down to bags of bird seed. That particular brand of bird seed contained wheat and she kept breathing in the dust [and swallowing it] when she was feeding the birds.

    Kisses from loved ones – while this may sound strange, crumbs and residue can remain on hands/faces/mouths of loved ones for hours.

    Microwave – how often do you put something in there and as foods heat up, things splatter around? These guys can be a real harbor for gluten pollution.

    Grill grates – it might be time to replace the grates on the old weber. Of course you could try cleaning them, but sometimes that’s a nasty job in itself! If cleaning or replacing the grills are not an option – grill your GF items on tinfoil.

    Hair/skin care products – if you happen to touch your hair, it’s possible for hairspray, etc to get on your hands and thus on your food or into your mouth. Most experts will say that topical connect from gluten will not cause a celiac reaction – it must be ingested in order for it cause problems. However, I know many people that do experience some type of skin reaction when they touch it. Is this a true celiac reaction or some other type of reaction – not really sure. This is a highly debated topic. Bottom line, if you react in any way – make sure the product is GF. Problem solved! For more information on GF cosmetics/hair care products, please check out: http://www.gigofecw.org/news/files/gf_cosmetics_hair_skin_care.php

    Condiments (spreadable) – jars of peanut butter, mayo, butter, margarine, jelly, etc. These guys are huge cross-contamination magnets! Double dipping is strictly prohibited and a punishable offence! You’ll need to train people on the fine art of Gob Dropping or using a couple of spoons/knives to accomplish their task. Of course some of these products can be gotten in squeezable containers – this can help. If you think you can double dip just because you’re using GF products – think again… First of all, you won’t be able to tell if those crumbs are GF or NGF. Second of all, crumbs of any kind in those places are not good eats! GACK!

    Shared bowls/bags of your favorite GF snack food - Think about when someone makes a monster sized NGF Dagwood sandwich, then they dig their gluteny paws into the potato chip bowl/bag. Bags of snacks must be poured out into an individual bowl.

    Telephone/Keyboard/Mouse/TV Remote – yup these can get glutened too.


    For a more detailed look at gluten cross contamination, please see our Guide to Gluten Cross Contamination.


    A Day in the Life

    Getting the hang of safely surviving in a mixed house will take some time. Let’s face it, you’ve probably lived NGF for a lot longer than GF. Old habits and actions take time retrain and rewire. You will make some mistakes starting out, count on that. I know, people are going to say “if you had GF house you wouldn’t have to worry about mistakes…”. Yeah, well, if you stay in bed, you don’t have to worry about getting hit by a car either. This is life, life isn’t perfect, so we do the best we can with the situation we have. After awhile you become conditioned – for better or worse. We were making lunch one day, Peg had her NGF bread on her plate already and she asked me to lay some sandwich meat on her bread since her hands were contaminated at that point. I pulled out a few pieces and I was starting and stopping with jerky movements. Peg thought I was messing around and asked what I was doing. I told her I was having trouble putting the meat on her NGF bread. I had become so conditioned to NOT do it, I had trouble doing it even when it was acceptable to do.

    Spaghetti - Take cooking spaghetti for example…how do you test it to see if it’s done? No, throwing it on the wall to see if it sticks is not an option – at least in our house. Right – you taste it. We’ll that’s not possible if you’re cooking NGF pasta – however, old habits are hard to break! I know I’m not the only one that has put NGF pasta in my mouth to see if it was done then realized in horror what just happened. This was years ago, and I have since retrained myself not to do that. Now if I’m cooking pasta for Peg, I will do it by feel. Pinch it between my fingers – then have Peg taste it. Yes, I wash my hands after testing it.

    I can hear you asking – “How do you keep straight which utensil to use?” It’s fairly easy actually. Since I’m left handed, I will put my GF pasta pot [yes I have my own pasta pot] on the left side of the stove. I will put Peg’s NGF pasta pot on the right side of the stove. I keep each utensil on the corresponding side. Also remember that my utensils are colored red – this helps in keeping things straight.

    I can hear another question - “How do you stop gluten water from bubbling/splashing over into yours?” I stagger the time that I put in the GF and the NGF pasta. I’ll do mine first so it gets done first and thus drained first [into my GF colander]. If I have both going at the same time, I watch the heat to make sure it’s not splashing over the sides of the pot and I’m careful when I stir.

    The pasta sauce is GF. Peg can add any NGF modifiers to her plate if she chooses.

    This is pretty much how all of our meals are…the base of the meal is GF…then Peg can add whatever she wants. Most times it’s nothing NGF. Pastas, breads, pizzas, cereals/breakfast bars and some desserts – are about our only separate food items.

    Baking – As I mentioned I have my own GF baking pans/tray/mixing paddles and mixing bowl [the bowl is stainless so it’s not a big deal anyway]. Peg still does some NGF baking [for fun and some profit]. Around the holidays it’s not uncommon for her to bake me some goodies then bake NGF goodies for herself or an order. Always, always always, the GF items are baked first. After she’s done with the GF baking, she’ll do the NGF baking – using the NGF equipment. It’s been reported that flour poofs around and and stays in the air for up to 24 hrs. Peg maintains that if you’re careful, you can keep the flour poofing to a minimum. She also maintains that GF flour poofs worse than NGF flour. Most generally I am not around when Peg has the NGF flour out, but I happened to watch her one time when she was scooping out the flour and mixing it – I did not see clouds of flour anywhere. The mixer is turned on slowly so flour is not spewed out all over. It would be interesting to do this under a black light to see if we could see it.

    As an [unscientific] experiment, I placed several pieces of dark blue paper [sorry, no black was handy] around the kitchen before Peg started her non-gluten-free baking. No mixer was used in this experiment – all mixing was done by hand. Two pieces were sitting between 6” and 2 feet from the measuring/mixing/rollout area. The remaining piece was sitting about 2 feet away on the stove. The 2 pieces closest to the measuring/mixing/rollout area had a few small specks of non-gluten-free flour. The paper sitting on the stove, had no visible flour on it. I will say, that I have never seen or felt a coating of dust/flour after GF or NGF baking.

    When NGF baking she clears off the counter so if flour does happen to poof around, it won’t settle on anything…other than the counter. When she’s done the counter is thoroughly cleaned and counter items put back after cleaning.


    Hosting Family Events

    In some cases family events tend to buffet type setups. Should this be the case, arrange all the gluten foods last in the line and away from the GF foods. It also helps explain to guests what foods are what and not mix the utensils. If you have things like BBQ’s [aka Sloppy Joes] or things that guests might have to build themselves – have 2 separate stations/containers for these -this way you can keep yours [the lion’s share] safe. It’s always smart to have smaller portions at the NGF station. Once it contaminated – you’re not going to want it – unless someone else in the house can eat it. Should you run out or low of the fixin’s at the NGF station you can always refill it from the GF container.

    Another tip is to be the first thru the line so you know there’s been no cross contamination. There’s gotta be some perks to this GF thing, right?


    Outside your Kitchen

    Cross-contamination also occurs outside your kitchen too. We’ve already discussed the cross-contamination issues and dining out. It also applies to our food and how it’s processed and packaged at the manufacturer. You’ve probably all seen the “Processed in the same facility that process wheat, peanuts, cat hair, whale blubber…”

    According to Cynthia Kupper, RD [Director of Gluten Intolerance Group of North America] in her talk at HealthNow's Gluten Sensitivity/Celiac Forum 2010, the “Processed in..” and “Processed on...” statements are voluntary advisory statements designed for those with IgE [anaphylactic reaction] allergies. Many companies use the statements to “cover their backsides” legally. In reality they have no meaning for celiacs. She stated a group of registered dietitians knowledgeable in celiac/gluten-free; determined it would be reckless of them to suggest that the voluntary statements be used solely to determine the gluten-free status. If you have a true IgE reaction, you need to heed the warning. I highly recommend buying and watching HealthNow's 2010 Gluten Forum DVD. Well worth the $15.00.

    Some companies are better than others when it comes to processing our foods. According to a 2005 report from the Inst.of Food Technologists - nearly all companies do follow “good manufacturing practices” [except for the Peanut Corp. of America], which the IFT concluded to be “effective in reducing or eliminating cross contamination”. While many processes take multiple steps to protect consumers, some don’t take any. ACK!!

    FDA studies conducted from 1999 – 2005 revealed*:

    About 55% of food processors identified and separated ingredients with allergens as raw materials.

    About 80% took one or more steps to keep food processing equipment clean and prevent allergens from spreading to otherwise allergen-free foods. This includes: dedicated machinery, cleaning shared machinery between runs. Clean was the most common.

    The most common source of cross-contamination comes from the build up of food residue on equipment even after it has been cleaned.

    About 25% of the facilities were still likely to have allergen contamination in foods they produce. FDA states this figure should not be used as a gauge of overall cross-contamination in processed foods since these inspections were not chosen at random – they targeted facilities where the possibility of cross-contamination was the greatest.

    Some companies when they first switch from an NGF run to a GF run [after the cleanup process was done] will donate a certain percentage of the product from the first run to a non-allergic organization in an effort to reduce the cross-contamination risk.

    *The source of this information was obtained from: Department of Health and Human Services, Food and Drug Administration, Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act of 2004, Public law 108-282, Report to the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions, United States Senate and The Committee on Energy and Commerce, United States House of Representatives, July 2006. The original PDF located at: http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/~acrobat/alrgrep.pdf could no longer be found.



    Summary

    • Choosing a 100% or mixed house based on many factors. It’s a personal choice, do what’s best for your situation.


    • Large percentage of homes are mixed.


    • To be successful, total buy-in from other household member to follow all the GF rules.


    • Pull out everything and clean thoroughly everywhere with warm soapy water.


    • Organize kitchen & pantry. Separate GF and NGF as much as possible.


    • GF items are stored ABOVE NGF items.


    • Store items in sealable containers. Label them GF or NGF.


    • Have a GF zone somewhere in your kitchen.


    • Replace: Toasters, Colanders/strainers/sifters, anything wooden, cutting boards, cake pans, scratched nonstick pans, cast iron skillets, ceramic bakeware.


    • Labeling and marking of all items are important. Use colors to help remind.


    • Areas of concern: counter tops, dishtowels/sponges/dishrags, pet food, kisses, Microwave, grill grates, ceramic bake/cookware, skin/haircare products, spreadable condiments, shared bags/bowls of snacks, telephone/keyboard/mouse/remotes.




    Resources and web sites used for this presentation:

    What Is Gluten Cross-Contamination? And Why Should You Worry About It?
    By Nancy Lapid , About.com
    http://celiacdisease.about.com/od/cookingglutenfree/a/crosscontaminat.htm


    Hold The Gluten 10 - Avoiding Cross Contamination
    http://holdthegluten.net/2008/10/16/avoiding-cross-contamination/


    Gluten Free Living – Spring 2007 Issue
    http://www.glutenfreeliving.com/


    Living GF for Dummies by Danna Korn
    http://www.dannakorn.com/my-books/books-available-online/


    GIG’s Producing GF Products from a Non-Dedicated Kitchen
    https://www.gluten.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/EDU_NonDedKit_6.3.14.pdf


    GIG’s Quick Start Diet Guide
    https://www.gluten.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/QuickStartGuide-Website.pdf


    Tricia Thompson’s – The Gluten-Free Nutrition Guide
    http://glutenfreedietitian.com/gluten_free_books.php




    Printer Friendly



    Updated:

    07/19/14 -
    06/24/14 - Fixed broken links

    Better living thru Gluten-Free Chemistry

    Updated 10/19/2016

    In January I had to re-enter the world of pharmaceuticals [much to my displeasure, but best for my long term health]. If you think determining the gluten-free status of food is difficult, try doing it with prescription medications! It's difficult at best to determine it by reading the ingredient label, and getting a pharmaceutical company to say if their product is gluten-free is like pulling teeth. Ugh...

    The Food Allergen Labeling Consumer Protection Act of 2004 [FALCPA]
    requires packaged food items to declare wheat and other allergens, but medications do not fall under the umbrella of the FDA's rulings.

    Medications contain the active ingredient, but generally it needs to combined with something else - something called an excipient.

    What's an excipient?

    It's a pharmacological term used for an inert substance that acts as a carrier for the actual drug itself [the "active ingredient"]. Excipients are also used as a filler to bulk up formulations to ensure proper and accurate dosages and as a binder [pill form].

    For an extensive list of excipients, see
    glutenfreedrugs.com Excipients List; complete with descriptions.

    Drugs.com has an excellent
    Inactive Ingredients page. Does not address gluten, but very in-depth explanations of each item.

    Starches found in medications can include:

    Corn (most common)
    Caramel Coloring*
    Dextrates*
    Dextrin*
    Dextrimaltose*

    Maltodextrin*
    Modified Starch*
    Potato
    Pregelatinized Starch*
    Pregelatinized Modified Starch*
    Sodium Starch Glycolate*
    Tapioca
    Wheat









    *These items need further investigation if the source of the starch is not specified. The ingredient in question could be derived from either a glutenous or non-glutenous plant source.


    Since drug companies don't have to disclose source of the starch, there is no easy way to tell if certain ingredients are gluten-free. Calling the manufacturer is the only [and best] option.

    Common gluten-free excipients include*:

    Acacia
    Alginic acid
    Alpha tocopheral
    Ascorbic acid
    Benzyl alcohol
    Calcium carbonate
    Carboxymethylcellulose
    Citric acid
    Corn starch
    Croscarmellose sodium
    Dextrose
    Docusate sodium
    Fructose
    Glucose
    Hydrogenated vegetable oil
    Hydroxypropyl cellulose
    Lactose
    Magnesium carbonate
    Magnesium stearate
    Matitol
    Maltose
    Mannitol
    Microcrystalline cellulose
    Polydextrose
    Povidone
    Propylene glycol
    Silicon dioxide
    Simethicone
    Sodium benzoate
    Sodium lauryl sulfate
    Sorbitol
    Stearic acid
    Sucrose
    Vanillin
    Xanthan gum
    Zinc stearate















    *Source: The Gluten Intolerance Group Medications & Celiac Disease

    Cynthia Kupper, RD (Executive Director of the Gluten Intolerance Group) states that patches, inhalants, injectables, and liquids/elixirs are not problematic for those following a gluten-free diet. Source: HealthNow's 2010 Gluten Forum DVD


    Mylan Labs

    NOTE: This conversation was from 2013. I have not contacted them since.

    So far, Mylan Labs has the best response about GF status of several pharmaceutical companies.

    I was doing a status check on a medication and had an interesting talk with a Mylan [a drug mfg] customer service rep. He was very knowledgeable and understanding. He was a nurse, so he had a clue about celiac disease. He even mentioned gluten sensitivity.

    They have a manufacturing facility in Morgantown, WV where 80-90% of their meds are made. The rep I spoke with last was based in WV. The rep I spoke with earlier, was not from location, probably PA. They do outsource some meds to a facility in India.

    I was told that no wheat, barley, rye, spelt or oats are used in that facility in Morgantown. I was told by the rep in PA 3 months ago, that the "no gluten" was no longer the case. I will still continue to verify that info every 3 months at refill.

    I asked raw ingredients were tested for gluten...he said ingredients were tested for quality and purity, but did not specifically say gluten. He did mention that they did test one of their meds [I can't remember which one], and it tested as gluten-free.

    When calling Mylan, try to speak with someone in the Morgantown, WV plant. They will need the name of medication, the dosage, and the markings on the medication. If tablet - they'll ask about both sides



    Here are a few other links of interest:



    A good resource to start your GF meds search is http://glutenfreedrugs.com/ This site is maintained by Steve Plogsted, PharmD, BCNSP, CNSC and his pharmacy students at Columbus Children’s Hospital, Columbus, OH.

    As with all gluten-free lists - they should only be used as a guide - a starting point. Please verify the status of these products before you take them as ingredients can change.



    A lot of great information about medications and gluten.

    A companion piece is this great webinar with Steve Plogsted recorded on February 11th, 2015:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DwZvYPhfGZg

    Download the slides from that webinar - another excellent resource!


    Medication and Supplement Use in Celiac Disease - Medscape (requires a free account)

    Ashley N. Johnson, PharmD, BCPS, Angela N. Skaff, BS, PharmD Candidate, Lauren Senesac, PharmD Candidate. US Pharmacist. 2014;39(12):44-48

    "Abstract: Celiac disease is a chronic condition involving an abnormal immune response to the ingestion of gluten-containing foods and products that commonly results in digestive symptoms, although other organ systems may be involved. The current mainstay of therapy is the avoidance of gluten-containing foods, beverages, and other products. However, if not equipped with the knowledge that medications, OTC products, supplements, and vitamins may contain gluten, patients with celiac disease may experience ongoing symptoms from continued ingestion of these products. Therefore, pharmacists play an essential role in educating patients and evaluating their medication use to ensure the optimal management of celiac disease."



    This is a great article, despite it's age [Jan. 2007]. If you are gluten-free and take medications, please take the time to read this article and educate yourself. Pharmacists also need to be educated about gluten-free medication as well. It has been my experience that GF knowledge is hit and miss [at least in my home town]. I printed this article and gave it to my pharmacist.

    Note: Due to the article's age, any brand name products that are stated as gluten-free, should no longer be considered GF. It's my opinion that any published list of gluten-free products, should not be blindly followed. Since manufacturers can change the ingredient list without notice, the product needs to be verified with each purchase.



    Great article by Lisa Fitterman about gluten in medication.



    Great article by Erica Dermer. Can your pharmacist tell you whether there's gluten in your prescriptions?



    4 tips to make your medications safer.



    A lot of good information in this interview with Steve Plogsted, PharmD, BCNSP, CNSC.



    Older article, but still has useful information



    Older article, but still has useful information



    More info about gluten in medication. Another interview with Steve Plogsted, PharmD, BCNSP, CNSC.



    Hints and tips from Nancy Lipid.



    DailyMed provides high quality information about marketed drugs. This information includes FDA labels (package inserts) and ingredient lists. This Web site provides health information providers and the public with a standard, comprehensive, up-to-date, look-up and download resource of medication content and labeling as found in medication package inserts. The National Library of Medicine (NLM) provides this as a public service and does not accept advertisements.



    Pillbox – Provides a way to search medications by ingredient. The Pillbox website was developed to aid in the identification of unknown pills (oral solid dosage form medications). It combines images of pills with appearance and other information to enable users to visually search for and identify oral solid dosage form medications.

    Once a pill has been identified, additional information is provided, including brand/generic name, ingredients, and the National Drug File identification number.



    NFCA presents some basic background information on celiac disease and areas where gluten might hide in medications.

    Sadly, NFCA no longer offers a free online continuing education program for Pharmacists. However, a handout from the program is still available: Celiac Disease Training for Pharmacists. Still worth sharing with your pharmacist.

    They also have a
    PDF for Pharmacists.



    Background info on Gluten in Medicine Disclosure Act (HR 2003)

    HR 2003: Gluten in Medicine Disclosure Act Update - November 2013:
    http://celiac.org/blog/2013/11/06/hr-2003-gluten-in-medicine-disclosure-act-update/



    Reps Tim Ryan (OH) and Nita Lowey (NY) have introduced the Gluten in Medicine Disclosure Act (HR 2003). This bill requires the sources of gluten to be listed on medication labels.

    NFCA interviews Nita Lowey about the Gluten in Medicine Disclosure Act -
    Read More...

    Please, Click here to tell your Representative that we need better labeling on our medications!

    Follow this bill's progress via GOVTrack.us.

    The Gluten in Medicine Disclosure Act has been endorsed by: American Celiac Disease Alliance, National Foundation for Celiac Awareness, Celiac Disease Foundation, Celiac Sprue Association, Gluten Intolerance Group, North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, and the American College of Gastroenterology.



    Suzy Cohen participated in Dr. Tom O'Bryan's Gluten Summit: A Grain of Truth. Her topic was "Hidden Sources of Gluten in Your Vitamins and Medications". She offered a lot of great information about navigating the world of medications. If you missed the free airing of these interviews, you can purchase access to all 29 amazing interviews.

    Suzy's
    DearPharmacist.com website contains a couple of links worth checking out.





    Hopefully you and your Pharmacist find this info helpful.

    Al

    update 10/19/16 - added AllergicLiving.com's link
    update 10/31/15 - Updated GIG's Celiac Disease & Medications link
    update 09/12/15 - Added Living Without's - Gluten-Free and More article "Gluten in the Pharmacy"
    update 05/13/15 - Added Living Without's - Gluten-Free and More article "Allergens in your Medication"
    update 02/23/15 - Added Medscape article "Medications and Supplement Use in Celiac Disease"
    update 02/13/15 - Added med research sites and Gluten in Medication Webinar/slides
    update 07/29/14 - Added CDF link
    update 05/25/14 - Added About.com article.

    update 05/25/14 - Added PracticalGastro 2008 & 2009 articles.
    update 05/25/14 - Added Delight Gluten-Free Magazine article.
    update 03/18/14 - remove link to GREAT Pharmacists training - add link to corresponding PDF
    update: 12/14/13 - updated link to GIG's Medications & Celiac Disease educational bulletin
    update: 11/9/13 - added Gluten In Medicine Disclosure Act info
    update: 9/11/13 - added Living Without's Steven Plogsted interview
    update: 05/03/13 - added more info on excipients.

    CD more common than 50 years ago

    Celiac expert and gastroenterologist, Dr. Joseph Murray, of Mayo Clinic lead a study that is published in the July 2009 issue of Gastroenterology.

    This study looked at blood samples that were collected at
    Warren Air Force Base between 1948 and 1954. The researchers tested the samples for celiac disease and compared the results from those individuals collected recently. They found young people today are more than 4 times as likely to have celiac disease than the same age group in the 1950's.

    Also noted in the study was that patients who did not know they had celiac disease were almost 4 times as likely to have died during the 45 years of follow up.

    It's not known exactly why it much more common.

    Watch a video of Dr. Murray discuss this study

    More details on the study can be found here.


    Al's Commentary:

    I wonder how much of the increase has to do with the amount of processed foods that exist in the Standard American Diet?